• Sunset over the Sultan Ahmed Mosque (Sultanahmet Camii) or Blue Mosque, Istanbul, Turkey. Built from 1609 to 1616 during the rule of Ahmed I.
  • Sarayburnu or Seraglio Point with a ferry and the banks of the Golden Horn in the foreground, Istanbul Turkey.
  • The Maiden's Tower Lighthouse at the mouth of the Bosphorus first built by the ancient Athenian general Alcibiades in 408 BC,  looking towrads from left, the Blue Mosque, Hagia Sophia & the Topkapi Palace on Sarayburnu or Seraglio Point , Istanbul Turkey.
  • Basilica Cisterns for water storage built in the 6th century during the reign of Byzantine (Eastern Roman)  Emperor Justinian I. Istanbul Turkey
  • The Maiden's Tower Lighthouse at the mouth of the Bosphorus first built by the ancient Athenian general Alcibiades in 408 BC,  looking towrads from left, the Blue Mosque, Hagia Sophia & the Topkapi Palace on Sarayburnu or Seraglio Point , Istanbul Turkey.
  • Fishing boat in the Golden Horn on the Galata banks looking towards the Suleymaniye Mosque (Süleymaniye Camii, 1550-1558)  on the Third Hill, Istanbul Turkey.
  • The Yeni Camii, The New Mosque or Mosque of the Valide Sultan ordered by Safiye Sultan in 1597 with a ferry on  the banks of the Golden Horn, Istanbul Turkey.
  • The Suleymaniye Mosque (Süleymaniye Camii, 1550-1558)  on the Third Hill and boats selling cooked fish on the banks of the Golden Horn, Istanbul Turkey.
  • Fisherman on the Galata bridge fishing in the Golden Horn next to The Yeni Camii, The New Mosque or Mosque of the Valide Sultan ordered by Safiye Sultan in 1597, Istanbul Turkey.
  • The Suleymaniye Mosque (Süleymaniye Camii, 1550-1558)  on the Third Hill, Istanbul Turkey.
  • The Suleymaniye Mosque (Süleymaniye Camii, 1550-1558)  on the Third Hill, Istanbul Turkey.
  • Traditional bread ring seller stiklal Avenue or Istiklal Street (stiklâl Caddesi, French: Grande Rue de Péra, or Independence Avenue)  one of the most famous avenues in Istanbul, Turkey
  • historic tram of stiklal Avenue or Istiklal Street (stiklâl Caddesi, French: Grande Rue de Péra, or Independence Avenue)  one of the most famous avenues in Istanbul, Turkey
  • Islamic tomb stones in a Fatih cemetery, Istanbul Turkey
  • Islamic tomb stones in a Fatih cemetery, Istanbul Turkey
  • Islamic tomb stones in a Fatih cemetery, Istanbul Turkey
  • The base of the Egyptian Obelisk of Thutmosis III, (Dikilitas) a centre piece of the Roman Hippadrome, showing Roman Emperor Theodosius offering a laurel wreath to the victor from the Kathisma. Istanbul Turkey
  • The Tower of Justice (Adalet Kulesi) originally constructed under Mehmed II and then renovated and enlarged by Suleiman I between 1527-1529, Topkapi Palace Istnabul
  • The Fountain of Sultan Ahmed III (Turkish: III. Ahmet Çemesi) is a fountain in a Turkish rococo structure built in 1728 in the style of the Tulip period,  located in the great square in front of the Imperial Gate of Topkap Palace in Istanbul, Turkey.
  • The Suleymaniye Mosque (Süleymaniye Camii, 1550-1558)  on the Third Hill and a ferry boat and the banks of the Golden Horn, Istanbul Turkey.
  • The  Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • The  Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • The Sultan Ahmed Mosque (Sultanahmet Camii) or Blue Mosque, Istanbul, Turkey. Built from 1609 to 1616 during the rule of Ahmed I.
  • The Sultan Ahmed Mosque (Sultanahmet Camii) or Blue Mosque, Istanbul, Turkey at sunset. Built from 1609 to 1616 during the rule of Ahmed I.
  • The Sultan Ahmed Mosque (Sultanahmet Camii) or Blue Mosque, Istanbul, Turkey at night. Built from 1609 to 1616 during the rule of Ahmed I.
  • The Sultan Ahmed Mosque (Sultanahmet Camii) or Blue Mosque, Istanbul, Turkey. Built from 1609 to 1616 during the rule of Ahmed I.
  • Sunset over the Sultan Ahmed Mosque (Sultanahmet Camii) or Blue Mosque, Istanbul, Turkey. Built from 1609 to 1616 during the rule of Ahmed I.
  • Panorama of The Sultan Ahmed Mosque (Sultanahmet Camii) or Blue Mosque, Istanbul, Turkey. Built from 1609 to 1616 during the rule of Ahmed I.
  • The Sultan Ahmed Mosque (Sultanahmet Camii) or Blue Mosque, Istanbul, Turkey. Built from 1609 to 1616 during the rule of Ahmed I.
  • Sunset over the Sultan Ahmed Mosque (Sultanahmet Camii) or Blue Mosque, Istanbul, Turkey. Built from 1609 to 1616 during the rule of Ahmed I.
  • Entrance to the inner courtyards of the  Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Tiled passage to the Privy Chamber of Sultan Murad III. Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • The apartments of the Queen Mother in the Harem of the Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • The apartments of the Queen Mother in the Harem of the Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • The apartments of the Queen Mother in the Harem of the Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • The apartments of the Queen Mother in the Harem of the Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Decorative tiled panels of the Harem in the Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Decorative tiled panels of the Harem in the Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • "The Hall with a Fountain" of the Harem, the vestibule where princes & consorts of the sultan waited before entering the Imperial Hall. The tiles are 17th century Kutahaya and Iznik tiles. Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • "The Hall with a Fountain" of the Harem, the vestibule where princes & consorts of the sultan waited before entering the Imperial Hall. The tiles are 17th century Kutahaya and Iznik tiles. Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Entrance to the apartments of  the Eunuchs in the Harem. Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Courtyard of the Eunuchs in the Harem. Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • The Enderûn Library (Enderûn Kütüphanesi), also known as "Library of Sultan Ahmed III" . The walls above the windows are decorated with 16th and 17th century İznik tiles of variegated design and the  dome and vaults are typical of the Tulip period, which lasted from 1703 to 1730.  Tarkapi Palace Istanbul, Turkey
  • The Enderûn Library (Enderûn Kütüphanesi), also known as "Library of Sultan Ahmed III" . The walls above the windows are decorated with 16th and 17th century İznik tiles of variegated design and the  dome and vaults are typical of the Tulip period, which lasted from 1703 to 1730.  Tarkapi Palace Istanbul, Turkey
  • The Imperial Council (Dîvân-ı Hümâyûn) building where the ruling councillors held meetings. Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • The Imperial Council (Dîvân-ı Hümâyûn) building where the ruling councillors held meetings. Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • The Imperial Council (Dîvân-ı Hümâyûn) building where the ruling councillors held meetings. Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • The Imperial Council (Dîvân-ı Hümâyûn) building where the ruling councillors held meetings. Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • The Imperial Council (Dîvân-ı Hümâyûn) building where the ruling councillors held meetings. Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • The Imperial Council (Dîvân-ı Hümâyûn) building where the ruling councillors held meetings. Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • The Imperial Council (Dîvân-ı Hümâyûn) building where the ruling councillors held meetings. Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • The Imperial Council (Dîvân-ı Hümâyûn) building where the ruling councillors held meetings. Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Ancient hill fort next to the  the Ishak Pasha Palace (Turkish: İshak Paşa Sarayı) ,  Ağrı province of eastern Turkey.
  • Ancient hill fort next to the  the Ishak Pasha Palace (Turkish: İshak Paşa Sarayı) ,  Ağrı province of eastern Turkey.
  • The Fatih Sultan Mehmet Bridge, also known as the Second Bosphorus Bridge Istanbul Turkey
  • Sunset over the Sultan Ahmed Mosque (Sultanahmet Camii) or Blue Mosque, Istanbul, Turkey. Built from 1609 to 1616 during the rule of Ahmed I.
  • Modern tower block & mosque on the Bosphorus, Istanbul Turkey
  • The Yeni Camii, The New Mosque or Mosque of the Valide Sultan ordered by Safiye Sultan in 1597 with a ferry on  the banks of the Golden Horn, Istanbul Turkey.
  • The Yeni Camii, The New Mosque or Mosque of the Valide Sultan (foreground) ordered by Safiye Sultan in 1597 on  the banks of the Golden Horn, Istanbul Turkey.
  • The Sultan Ahmed Mosque (Sultanahmet Camii or Blue Mosque 1609 to 1616 ) on Sarayburnu or Seraglio Point with a ferry and the banks of the Golden Horn in the foreground, Istanbul Turkey.
  • The Suleymaniye Mosque (Süleymaniye Camii, 1550-1558)  on the Third Hill with a ferries on the banks of the Golden Horn in the foreground, Istanbul Turkey.
  • The Suleymaniye Mosque (Süleymaniye Camii, 1550-1558)  on the Third Hill and boats selling cooked fish on the banks of the Golden Horn, Istanbul Turkey.
  • historic tram of stiklal Avenue or Istiklal Street (stiklâl Caddesi, French: Grande Rue de Péra, or Independence Avenue)  one of the most famous avenues in Istanbul, Turkey
  • historic tram of stiklal Avenue or Istiklal Street (stiklâl Caddesi, French: Grande Rue de Péra, or Independence Avenue)  one of the most famous avenues in Istanbul, Turkey
  • Monument of the Republic with Ataturk , Taxim Square Istanbul Turkey
  • Islamic tomb stones in a Fatih cemetery, Istanbul Turkey
  • The base of the Egyptian Obelisk of Thutmosis III, a centre piece of the Roman Hippadrome, showing Roman spectators in the Hippadrome. Istanbul Turkey
  • The base of the Egyptian Obelisk of Thutmosis III, (Dikilitas) a centre piece of the Roman Hippadrome, showing Roman Emperor Theodosius offering a laurel wreath to the victor from the Kathisma. Istanbul Turkey
  • The base of the Egyptian Obelisk of Thutmosis III, (Dikilitas) a centre piece of the Roman Hippadrome, showing Roman Emperor Theodosius offering a laurel wreath to the victor from the Kathisma. Istanbul Turkey
  • The Courtyard of the Favourites (Gözdeler / Mabeyn Tal ve Dairesi)  was the space where Sultan Abül Hamid I lived with the  Favourite Consort of his harem, Topkapi Palace Istanbul
  • The Fountain of Sultan Ahmed III (Turkish: III. Ahmet Çemesi) is a fountain in a Turkish rococo structure built in 1728 in the style of the Tulip period,  located in the great square in front of the Imperial Gate of Topkap Palace in Istanbul, Turkey.
  • Interior of The Sultan Ahmed Mosque (Sultanahmet Camii) or Blue Mosque, Istanbul, Turkey. Built from 1609 to 1616 during the rule of Ahmed I the interior is decorated with Iznik tiles.
  • The Sultan Ahmed Mosque (Sultanahmet Camii) or Blue Mosque, Istanbul, Turkey. Built from 1609 to 1616 during the rule of Ahmed I.
  • Sunset over the Sultan Ahmed Mosque (Sultanahmet Camii) or Blue Mosque, Istanbul, Turkey. Built from 1609 to 1616 during the rule of Ahmed I.
  • The Sultan Ahmed Mosque (Sultanahmet Camii) or Blue Mosque, Istanbul, Turkey. Built from 1609 to 1616 during the rule of Ahmed I.
  • The Sultan Ahmed Mosque (Sultanahmet Camii) or Blue Mosque, Istanbul, Turkey. Built from 1609 to 1616 during the rule of Ahmed I.
  • The Sultan Ahmed Mosque (Sultanahmet Camii) or Blue Mosque, Istanbul, Turkey. Built from 1609 to 1616 during the rule of Ahmed I.
  • Sunset over the Sultan Ahmed Mosque (Sultanahmet Camii) or Blue Mosque, Istanbul, Turkey. Built from 1609 to 1616 during the rule of Ahmed I.
  • Sunset over the Sultan Ahmed Mosque (Sultanahmet Camii) or Blue Mosque, Istanbul, Turkey. Built from 1609 to 1616 during the rule of Ahmed I.
  • Interior of The Sultan Ahmed Mosque (Sultanahmet Camii) or Blue Mosque, Istanbul, Turkey. Built from 1609 to 1616 during the rule of Ahmed I the interior is decorated with Iznik tiles.
  • Sunset over the Sultan Ahmed Mosque (Sultanahmet Camii) or Blue Mosque, Istanbul, Turkey. Built from 1609 to 1616 during the rule of Ahmed I.
  • Entrance to the inner courtyards of the  Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • The apartments of the Queen Mother in the Harem of the Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • The apartments of the Queen Mother in the Harem of the Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • The apartments of the Queen Mother in the Harem of the Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • "The Hall with a Fountain" of the Harem, the vestibule where princes & consorts of the sultan waited before entering the Imperial Hall. The tiles are 17th century Kutahaya and Iznik tiles. Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • "The Hall with a Fountain" of the Harem, the vestibule where princes & consorts of the sultan waited before entering the Imperial Hall. The tiles are 17th century Kutahaya and Iznik tiles. Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • "The Hall with a Fountain" of the Harem, the vestibule where princes & consorts of the sultan waited before entering the Imperial Hall. The tiles are 17th century Kutahaya and Iznik tiles. Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • The Enderûn Library (Enderûn Kütüphanesi), also known as "Library of Sultan Ahmed III" . The walls above the windows are decorated with 16th and 17th century İznik tiles of variegated design and the  dome and vaults are typical of the Tulip period, which lasted from 1703 to 1730.  Tarkapi Palace Istanbul, Turkey
  • The Enderûn Library (Enderûn Kütüphanesi), also known as "Library of Sultan Ahmed III" . The walls above the windows are decorated with 16th and 17th century İznik tiles of variegated design and the  dome and vaults are typical of the Tulip period, which lasted from 1703 to 1730.  Tarkapi Palace Istanbul, Turkey
  • The Imperial Council (Dîvân-ı Hümâyûn) building where the ruling councillors held meetings. Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • The Imperial Council (Dîvân-ı Hümâyûn) building where the ruling councillors held meetings. Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • The Imperial Council (Dîvân-ı Hümâyûn) building where the ruling councillors held meetings. Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Ancient hill fort next to the  the Ishak Pasha Palace (Turkish: İshak Paşa Sarayı) ,  Ağrı province of eastern Turkey.
  • Ferries in the Golden Horn by the Galata Bridge, Istanbul Turkey
  • The Yeni Camii, The New Mosque or Mosque of the Valide Sultan (foreground) ordered by Safiye Sultan in 1597 on  the banks of the Golden Horn and the Galata bridge, Istanbul Turkey.
  • The Topkapi Palace on Sarayburnu or Seraglio Point with a ferry and the banks of the Golden Horn in the foreground, Istanbul Turkey.
  • The Suleymaniye Mosque (Süleymaniye Camii, 1550-1558)  on the Third Hill with a ferries on the banks of the Golden Horn in the foreground, Istanbul Turkey.
  • The Suleymaniye Mosque (Süleymaniye Camii, 1550-1558)  on the Third Hill, Istanbul Turkey.
  • Boat selling cooked fish in the Golden Horn. Istanbul Turkey
  • Islamic tomb stones in a Fatih cemetery, Istanbul Turkey
  • The base of the Egyptian Obelisk of Thutmosis III, (Dikilitas) a centre piece of the Roman Hippadrome, showing Roman Emperor Theodosius offering a laurel wreath to the victor from the Kathisma. Istanbul Turkey
  • Interior of The Sultan Ahmed Mosque (Sultanahmet Camii) or Blue Mosque, Istanbul, Turkey. Built from 1609 to 1616 during the rule of Ahmed I the interior is decorated with Iznik tiles.
  • Decorative tiled panels of the Harem in the Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • The Enderûn Library (Enderûn Kütüphanesi), also known as "Library of Sultan Ahmed III" . The walls above the windows are decorated with 16th and 17th century İznik tiles of variegated design and the  dome and vaults are typical of the Tulip period, which lasted from 1703 to 1730.  Tarkapi Palace Istanbul, Turkey
  • The Imperial Council (Dîvân-ı Hümâyûn) building where the ruling councillors held meetings. Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Mosque next to the  the Ishak Pasha Palace (Turkish: İshak Paşa Sarayı) ,  Ağrı province of eastern Turkey..
  • The Ottoman White Tower of Thessaloniki (15351536), symbol of Thealonika. Greece
  • The Ottoman White Tower of Thessaloniki (15351536), symbol of Thealonika. Greece
  • The Ottoman White Tower of Thessaloniki (15351536), symbol of Thealonika. Greece
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Christ being baptised by John The Baptist in Byzantine mosaics of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Interior of a chapel and Orthodox icons of the Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Byzantine mosaics of Christ i Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Interior of a chapel and Orthodox icons of the Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Ruins of the Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Mystras established in 1205 after the conquest of Constantinople during the Fourth Crusade by Prince William II Villehardouin & capital of the Byzantine Despotate of The Morea in the 14th & 15th centuries. Mystras was the last Byzantine stronghold surrendered by Demetrius Palaeologus to the Ottoman Sultan Mehmen II in 1460. Sparta, the Peloponnese, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Mystras established in 1205 after the conquest of Constantinople during the Fourth Crusade by Prince William II Villehardouin & capital of the Byzantine Despotate of The Morea in the 14th & 15th centuries. Mystras was the last Byzantine stronghold surrendered by Demetrius Palaeologus to the Ottoman Sultan Mehmen II in 1460. Sparta, the Peloponnese, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Mystras established in 1205 after the conquest of Constantinople during the Fourth Crusade by Prince William II Villehardouin & capital of the Byzantine Despotate of The Morea in the 14th & 15th centuries. Mystras was the last Byzantine stronghold surrendered by Demetrius Palaeologus to the Ottoman Sultan Mehmen II in 1460. Sparta, the Peloponnese, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Mystras established in 1205 after the conquest of Constantinople during the Fourth Crusade by Prince William II Villehardouin & capital of the Byzantine Despotate of The Morea in the 14th & 15th centuries. Mystras was the last Byzantine stronghold surrendered by Demetrius Palaeologus to the Ottoman Sultan Mehmen II in 1460. Sparta, the Peloponnese, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Mystras established in 1205 after the conquest of Constantinople during the Fourth Crusade by Prince William II Villehardouin & capital of the Byzantine Despotate of The Morea in the 14th & 15th centuries. Mystras was the last Byzantine stronghold surrendered by Demetrius Palaeologus to the Ottoman Sultan Mehmen II in 1460. Sparta, the Peloponnese, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Venus de Milo ( Aphrodite of Milos ) A 203 cm (6 ft 8 in)  marble statue from the Greek Island of Milos sculpted in 130 and 100 BC thought to be the work of Alexandros of Antioch;. Louvre Museum, Paris. <br />
The Aphrodite of Milos was discovered on 8 April 1820 by a peasant named Yorgos Kentrotas, inside a buried niche within the ancient city ruins of Milos, the current village of Tripiti, on the island of Milos  in the Aegean, which was then a part of the Ottoman Empire. The statue was purchase by the French ambassador to Turkey and it was shipped to France. Legend has it that the statues arms were broken off during transport but this story however proved to be a fabrication – Voutier's drawings of the statue when it was first discovered show that its arms were already missing.<br />
<br />
In 1815, France had returned the Medici Venus,  to the Italians after it had been looted from Italy by Napoleon Bonaparte. The Medici Venus, regarded as one of the finest Classical sculptures in existence, caused the French to promote the Venus de Milo as a greater treasure than that which they recently had lost. The de Milo statue was praised dutifully by many artists and critics as the epitome of graceful female beauty. However, Pierre-Auguste Renoir was among its detractors, labeling it a "big gendarme".
  • Christ being baptised by John The Baptist in Byzantine mosaics of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The crusifiction Byzantine mosaic of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Interior of a chapel and Orthodox icons of the Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Interior of a chapel and Orthodox icons of the Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Ruins of the Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Ossary of Victims  of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance.  The Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Ruins of the Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Ruins of the Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Mystras established in 1205 after the conquest of Constantinople during the Fourth Crusade by Prince William II Villehardouin & capital of the Byzantine Despotate of The Morea in the 14th & 15th centuries. Mystras was the last Byzantine stronghold surrendered by Demetrius Palaeologus to the Ottoman Sultan Mehmen II in 1460. Sparta, the Peloponnese, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Mystras established in 1205 after the conquest of Constantinople during the Fourth Crusade by Prince William II Villehardouin & capital of the Byzantine Despotate of The Morea in the 14th & 15th centuries. Mystras was the last Byzantine stronghold surrendered by Demetrius Palaeologus to the Ottoman Sultan Mehmen II in 1460. Sparta, the Peloponnese, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Mystras established in 1205 after the conquest of Constantinople during the Fourth Crusade by Prince William II Villehardouin & capital of the Byzantine Despotate of The Morea in the 14th & 15th centuries. Mystras was the last Byzantine stronghold surrendered by Demetrius Palaeologus to the Ottoman Sultan Mehmen II in 1460. Sparta, the Peloponnese, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Mystras established in 1205 after the conquest of Constantinople during the Fourth Crusade by Prince William II Villehardouin & capital of the Byzantine Despotate of The Morea in the 14th & 15th centuries. Mystras was the last Byzantine stronghold surrendered by Demetrius Palaeologus to the Ottoman Sultan Mehmen II in 1460. Sparta, the Peloponnese, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Mystras established in 1205 after the conquest of Constantinople during the Fourth Crusade by Prince William II Villehardouin & capital of the Byzantine Despotate of The Morea in the 14th & 15th centuries. Mystras was the last Byzantine stronghold surrendered by Demetrius Palaeologus to the Ottoman Sultan Mehmen II in 1460. Sparta, the Peloponnese, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Mystras established in 1205 after the conquest of Constantinople during the Fourth Crusade by Prince William II Villehardouin & capital of the Byzantine Despotate of The Morea in the 14th & 15th centuries. Mystras was the last Byzantine stronghold surrendered by Demetrius Palaeologus to the Ottoman Sultan Mehmen II in 1460. Sparta, the Peloponnese, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Byzantine mosaics of of angels in Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Interior of a chapel and Orthodox icons of the Byzantine of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The Byzantine chapel & Ossary of Nea Moni built by Constantine IX and Empress Zoe after the miraculous appearance of an Icon of the Virgin Mary at the site and inaugurated in 1049. Scene of a terrible sack and massacre of hundreds of Chiots and priests during the Ottoman sack of Chios in reprisal for the 1821 Greek War of Indipendance. Nea Moni monastery, Chios Island, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Mystras established in 1205 after the conquest of Constantinople during the Fourth Crusade by Prince William II Villehardouin & capital of the Byzantine Despotate of The Morea in the 14th & 15th centuries. Mystras was the last Byzantine stronghold surrendered by Demetrius Palaeologus to the Ottoman Sultan Mehmen II in 1460. Sparta, the Peloponnese, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Mystras established in 1205 after the conquest of Constantinople during the Fourth Crusade by Prince William II Villehardouin & capital of the Byzantine Despotate of The Morea in the 14th & 15th centuries. Mystras was the last Byzantine stronghold surrendered by Demetrius Palaeologus to the Ottoman Sultan Mehmen II in 1460. Sparta, the Peloponnese, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Mystras established in 1205 after the conquest of Constantinople during the Fourth Crusade by Prince William II Villehardouin & capital of the Byzantine Despotate of The Morea in the 14th & 15th centuries. Mystras was the last Byzantine stronghold surrendered by Demetrius Palaeologus to the Ottoman Sultan Mehmen II in 1460. Sparta, the Peloponnese, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Mystras established in 1205 after the conquest of Constantinople during the Fourth Crusade by Prince William II Villehardouin & capital of the Byzantine Despotate of The Morea in the 14th & 15th centuries. Mystras was the last Byzantine stronghold surrendered by Demetrius Palaeologus to the Ottoman Sultan Mehmen II in 1460. Sparta, the Peloponnese, Greece. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.

FunkyStock Picture Library Resource

Picture The Past

ABOUT

FunkyStock Picture Library free resource for professional editorial picture editors, picture researchers, historical scholars and students and enthusiasts who want to browse some of the best pictures and images of historic countries, historical places, archaeological sites and the very best museum antiquities and artefacts exhibits in Europe and the Middle East.

Pictures and Images can be downloaded or bought as stock photos or photo art prints.

COUNTRIES

Browse travel pictures and images of historic places and archaeological sites of countries in Europe and the Middle East.

VIEW COUNTRIES INDEX....

HISTORICAL

Explore the past through pictures and images of its historic places. See the great palaces, castles and cities of antiquity as well as the great archaeological sites where our ancestors made history.

EXPLORE HISTORICAL PLACES...

MUSEUMS

Browse pictures & images the treasured artefacts and antiquities exhibits from the great Museum of Europe and the Middle East. See the art and objects made by our ancestors.

SEE MUESEUM ANTIQUITIES....