• Picture and image of the stone sculpture of 2 mourning sisters at the door of their mothers pyramid shaped tomb, The Rossi Tomb sculpted by G Benetti in 1878. Section D, no 24, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of a mouyring widow and two children sitting by the doors of the tomb with an angel. The Patrone tomb sculpted by S Varni 1976. Section D, no 23, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image  of the stone sculpture  of a young couple and an angel. The Pietrafraccia Tomb sculped by G. Navone 1909. Section A, no 17, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Pictures of the stone sculpture of a father and son in realistic style being handed a will by the deceased. Tomb of Gian Battista Castagnola 1896. The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of an angel standing by a stone sarcophagus. The Croce Tomb sculpted by G Moreno 1889. Section A, no 23, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of an angel blessing the deceased lying on a chez longue. Bonini Tomb sculpted by D Carli 1891. Section A, no 27, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the Art Nouveau stone sculpture of a nude. The Pizzorini Tomb by Vittorio  Lavezzari 1906. Section A, no 33, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the Art Nouveau stone sculpture of a nude. The Pizzorini Tomb by Vittorio  Lavezzari 1906. Section A, no 33, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of a stone sculpture of Giuseppe Recagno in a Borgeois Realistic style. The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of the Podesta family tomb in the Borgeois Realistic style by  D Carli 1892. Section A, no 39, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of an angel sitting on a sarcophagus. Piaggio Tomb sculpted by S Saccomanno 1876. Section A, no 46, The  monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculptured monumental tombs of lower arcade of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Pictures of the stone sculptured of a young girl, monumental Pelegrini tomb of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of an angel guarding the pyramid shaped tomb with some Egyptian symbols of death which increases the sense of mystery. Tomb Gorlero sculptor E. Sclavi 1892. Section A, no 24, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of an angel guarding the pyramid shaped tomb with some Egyptian symbols of death which increases the sense of mystery. Tomb Gorlero sculptor E. Sclavi 1892. Section A, no 24, The monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of Christ standing arms outstretched by the sacophagus of the deceased whilst his wife prays on the steps of the tomb. Sculpted in a Borgeoise Realistic style by GB Villa in 1881. The Tomati family tomb, section D no 12, the  monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of Christ standing arms outstretched by the sacophagus of the deceased whilst his wife prays on the steps of the tomb. Sculpted in a Borgeoise Realistic style by GB Villa in 1881. The Tomati family tomb, section D no 12, the  monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of Christ standing arms outstretched by the sacophagus of the deceased whilst his wife prays on the steps of the tomb. Sculpted in a Borgeoise Realistic style by GB Villa in 1881. The Tomati family tomb, section D no 12, the  monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of Christ standing arms outstretched by the sacophagus of the deceased whilst his wife prays on the steps of the tomb. Sculpted in a Borgeoise Realistic style by GB Villa in 1881. The Tomati family tomb, section D no 12, the  monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Picture and image of the stone sculpture of Christ standing arms outstretched by the sacophagus of the deceased whilst his wife prays on the steps of the tomb. Sculpted in a Borgeoise Realistic style by GB Villa in 1881. The Tomati family tomb, section D no 12, the  monumental tombs of the Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Pictures of a son and his dying father, In memory of a Portuguese patrician Battista Noli Da Costa. Sculpted in a realistic style by Risorgimento sculptor S Saccomanno in 1887, Section A, no 3, Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • Pictures of a son and his dying father, In memory of a Portuguese patrician Battista Noli Da Costa. Sculpted in a realistic style by Risorgimento sculptor S Saccomanno in 1887, Section A, no 3, Staglieno Monumental Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • Marble Roman Statue of the Muse of Music ( Euterpe ) playing the lyre. , 2nd cent. AD, from Miletus (Balat, Soke ). Istanbul Archaeological museum Inv 2002 T.  Cat. Mendel 116
  • Marble Roman Statue of the Muse of Music ( Euterpe ) playing the lyre. , 2nd cent. AD, from Miletus (Balat, Soke ). Istanbul Archaeological museum Inv 2002 T.  Cat. Mendel 116
  • Marble Roman Statue of the Muse of Music ( Euterpe ) playing the lyre. , 2nd cent. AD, from Miletus (Balat, Soke ). Istanbul Archaeological museum Inv 2002 T.  Cat. Mendel 116
  • Roman copy of a Greek  Hellenistic period statue of the poetess Sappho, from Symrna ( Izmir ), Turkey.. Sappho wrote about love with both sexes and her name led to the phrase "Sapphic love" which became synonmymous with lesbianism in the 20th century. Sappho was also from the island of Lesbos.  Istanbul Archaeological museum Inv 358 T. Cat Mendell 626.
  • Roman copy of a Greek  Hellenistic period statue of the poetess Sappho, from Symrna ( Izmir ), Turkey.. Sappho wrote about love with both sexes and her name led to the phrase "Sapphic love" which became synonmymous with lesbianism in the 20th century. Sappho was also from the island of Lesbos.  Istanbul Archaeological museum Inv 358 T. Cat Mendell 626.
  • Roman copy of a Greek  Hellenistic period statue of the poetess Sappho, from Symrna ( Izmir ), Turkey.. Sappho wrote about love with both sexes and her name led to the phrase "Sapphic love" which became synonmymous with lesbianism in the 20th century. Sappho was also from the island of Lesbos.  Istanbul Archaeological museum Inv 358 T. Cat Mendell 626.
  • Statue of a Nymphe, the spirit of the meadows, forest & waters, an early Roman marble sculpture, Ist cent B.C, from Tralles (Aydin) , west Turkey. Istanbul Archaeological museum Cat. Mendel 543.
  • Statue of a Nymphe, the spirit of the meadows, forest & waters, an early Roman marble sculpture, Ist cent B.C, from Tralles (Aydin) , west Turkey. Istanbul Archaeological museum Cat. Mendel 543.
  • Statue of a Nymphe, the spirit of the meadows, forest & waters, an early Roman marble sculpture, Ist cent B.C, from Tralles (Aydin) , west Turkey. Istanbul Archaeological museum Cat. Mendel 543.
  • Close up of the Gothic statues of The Schroner Bruner fountain ( The beautiful fountain ), Nurnberg, Nuremberg - Germany
  • Close up of the Gothic statues of The Schroner Bruner fountain ( The beautiful fountain ), Nurnberg, Nuremberg - Germany
  • Close up of the Gothic statues of The Schroner Bruner fountain ( The beautiful fountain ), Nurnberg, Nuremberg - Germany
  • Close up of the Gothic statues of The Schroner Bruner fountain ( The beautiful fountain ), Nurnberg, Nuremberg - Germany
  • Close up of the Gothic statues of The Schroner Bruner fountain ( The beautiful fountain ), Nurnberg, Nuremberg - Germany
  • Close up of the Gothic statues of The Schroner Bruner fountain ( The beautiful fountain ), Nurnberg, Nuremberg - Germany
  • Close up of the Gothic statues of The Schroner Bruner fountain ( The beautiful fountain ), Nurnberg, Nuremberg - Germany
  • Close up of the Gothic statues of The Schroner Bruner fountain ( The beautiful fountain ), Nurnberg, Nuremberg - Germany
  • Close up of the Gothic statues of The Schroner Bruner fountain ( The beautiful fountain ), Nurnberg, Nuremberg - Germany
  • Close up of the Gothic statues of The Schroner Bruner fountain ( The beautiful fountain ), Nurnberg, Nuremberg - Germany
  • Close up of the Gothic statues of The Schroner Bruner fountain ( The beautiful fountain ), Nurnberg, Nuremberg - Germany
  • Close up of the Gothic statues of The Schroner Bruner fountain ( The beautiful fountain ), Nurnberg, Nuremberg - Germany
  • Close up of the Gothic statues of The Schroner Bruner fountain ( The beautiful fountain ), Nurnberg, Nuremberg - Germany
  • Close up of the Gothic statues of The Schroner Bruner fountain ( The beautiful fountain ), Nurnberg, Nuremberg - Germany
  • Close up of the Gothic statues of The Schroner Bruner fountain ( The beautiful fountain ), Nurnberg, Nuremberg - Germany
  • Close up of the Gothic statues of The Schroner Bruner fountain ( The beautiful fountain ), Nurnberg, Nuremberg - Germany
  • Close up of the Gothic statues of The Schroner Bruner fountain ( The beautiful fountain ), Nurnberg, Nuremberg - Germany
  • Close up of the Gothic statues of The Schroner Bruner fountain ( The beautiful fountain ), Nurnberg, Nuremberg - Germany
  • Close up of the Gothic statues of The Schroner Bruner fountain ( The beautiful fountain ), Nurnberg, Nuremberg - Germany
  • Close up of the Gothic statues of The Schroner Bruner fountain ( The beautiful fountain ), Nurnberg, Nuremberg - Germany
  • Close up of the Gothic statues of The Schroner Bruner fountain ( The beautiful fountain ), Nurnberg, Nuremberg - Germany
  • Marble Roman Statue of the Muse of Music ( Euterpe ) playing the lyre. , 2nd cent. AD, from Miletus (Balat, Soke ). Istanbul Archaeological museum Inv 2002 T.  Cat. Mendel 116
  • Roman copy of a Greek  Hellenistic period statue of the poetess Sappho, from Symrna ( Izmir ), Turkey.. Sappho wrote about love with both sexes and her name led to the phrase "Sapphic love" which became synonmymous with lesbianism in the 20th century. Sappho was also from the island of Lesbos.  Istanbul Archaeological museum Inv 358 T. Cat Mendell 626.
  • Statue of a Nymphe, the spirit of the meadows, forest & waters, an early Roman marble sculpture, Ist cent B.C, from Tralles (Aydin) , west Turkey. Istanbul Archaeological museum Cat. Mendel 543.
  • Close up of the Gothic statues of The Schroner Bruner fountain ( The beautiful fountain ), Nurnberg, Nuremberg - Germany
  • Close up of the Gothic statues of The Schroner Bruner fountain ( The beautiful fountain ), Nurnberg, Nuremberg - Germany
  • Close up of the Gothic statues of The Schroner Bruner fountain ( The beautiful fountain ), Nurnberg, Nuremberg - Germany
  • Close up of the Gothic statues of The Schroner Bruner fountain ( The beautiful fountain ), Nurnberg, Nuremberg - Germany
  • Close up of the Gothic statues of The Schroner Bruner fountain ( The beautiful fountain ), Nurnberg, Nuremberg - Germany
  • Close up of the Gothic statues of The Schroner Bruner fountain ( The beautiful fountain ), Nurnberg, Nuremberg - Germany
  • Close up of the Gothic statues of The Schroner Bruner fountain ( The beautiful fountain ), Nurnberg, Nuremberg - Germany
  • Close up of the Gothic statues of The Schroner Bruner fountain ( The beautiful fountain ), Nurnberg, Nuremberg - Germany
  • Close up of the Gothic statues of The Schroner Bruner fountain ( The beautiful fountain ), Nurnberg, Nuremberg - Germany
  • Close up of the Gothic statues of The Schroner Bruner fountain ( The beautiful fountain ), Nurnberg, Nuremberg - Germany
  • Pictures & images of Jvari Monastery, a 6th century Georgian Orthodox monastery near Mtskheta, eastern Georgia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Jvari church is an early example of a four apse church with four niches domed tetraconch. The Jvari church had a great impact on the further development of Georgian architecture and served as a model for many other churches.<br />
<br />
The Historical Monuments of Jvari Monastery Mtskheta is located in the cultural landscape overlooking the confluence of the Aragvi and Mtkvari Rivers, in Central-Eastern Georgia, some 20km northwest of Tbilisi.
  • Pictures & images of Jvari Monastery, a 6th century Georgian Orthodox monastery near Mtskheta, eastern Georgia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Jvari church is an early example of a four apse church with four niches domed tetraconch. The Jvari church had a great impact on the further development of Georgian architecture and served as a model for many other churches.<br />
<br />
The Historical Monuments of Jvari Monastery Mtskheta is located in the cultural landscape overlooking the confluence of the Aragvi and Mtkvari Rivers, in Central-Eastern Georgia, some 20km northwest of Tbilisi.
  • Pictures & images of Jvari Monastery, a 6th century Georgian Orthodox monastery near Mtskheta, eastern Georgia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Jvari church is an early example of a four apse church with four niches domed tetraconch. The Jvari church had a great impact on the further development of Georgian architecture and served as a model for many other churches.<br />
<br />
The Historical Monuments of Jvari Monastery Mtskheta is located in the cultural landscape overlooking the confluence of the Aragvi and Mtkvari Rivers, in Central-Eastern Georgia, some 20km northwest of Tbilisi.
  • Pictures & images of Jvari Monastery, a 6th century Georgian Orthodox monastery near Mtskheta, eastern Georgia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Jvari church is an early example of a four apse church with four niches domed tetraconch. The Jvari church had a great impact on the further development of Georgian architecture and served as a model for many other churches.<br />
<br />
The Historical Monuments of Jvari Monastery Mtskheta is located in the cultural landscape overlooking the confluence of the Aragvi and Mtkvari Rivers, in Central-Eastern Georgia, some 20km northwest of Tbilisi.
  • Pictures & images of Jvari Monastery, a 6th century Georgian Orthodox monastery near Mtskheta, eastern Georgia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Jvari church is an early example of a four apse church with four niches domed tetraconch. The Jvari church had a great impact on the further development of Georgian architecture and served as a model for many other churches.<br />
<br />
The Historical Monuments of Jvari Monastery Mtskheta is located in the cultural landscape overlooking the confluence of the Aragvi and Mtkvari Rivers, in Central-Eastern Georgia, some 20km northwest of Tbilisi.
  • Pictures & images of Jvari Monastery, a 6th century Georgian Orthodox monastery near Mtskheta, eastern Georgia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Jvari church is an early example of a four apse church with four niches domed tetraconch. The Jvari church had a great impact on the further development of Georgian architecture and served as a model for many other churches.<br />
<br />
The Historical Monuments of Jvari Monastery Mtskheta is located in the cultural landscape overlooking the confluence of the Aragvi and Mtkvari Rivers, in Central-Eastern Georgia, some 20km northwest of Tbilisi.
  • Pictures & images of Jvari Monastery, a 6th century Georgian Orthodox monastery near Mtskheta, eastern Georgia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Jvari church is an early example of a four apse church with four niches domed tetraconch. The Jvari church had a great impact on the further development of Georgian architecture and served as a model for many other churches.<br />
<br />
The Historical Monuments of Jvari Monastery Mtskheta is located in the cultural landscape overlooking the confluence of the Aragvi and Mtkvari Rivers, in Central-Eastern Georgia, some 20km northwest of Tbilisi.
  • Pictures & images of Jvari Monastery, a 6th century Georgian Orthodox monastery near Mtskheta, eastern Georgia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Jvari church is an early example of a four apse church with four niches domed tetraconch. The Jvari church had a great impact on the further development of Georgian architecture and served as a model for many other churches.<br />
<br />
The Historical Monuments of Jvari Monastery Mtskheta is located in the cultural landscape overlooking the confluence of the Aragvi and Mtkvari Rivers, in Central-Eastern Georgia, some 20km northwest of Tbilisi.
  • Pictures & images of Jvari Monastery, a 6th century Georgian Orthodox monastery near Mtskheta, eastern Georgia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Jvari church is an early example of a four apse church with four niches domed tetraconch. The Jvari church had a great impact on the further development of Georgian architecture and served as a model for many other churches.<br />
<br />
The Historical Monuments of Jvari Monastery Mtskheta is located in the cultural landscape overlooking the confluence of the Aragvi and Mtkvari Rivers, in Central-Eastern Georgia, some 20km northwest of Tbilisi.
  • Pictures & images of Jvari Monastery, a 6th century Georgian Orthodox monastery near Mtskheta, eastern Georgia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Jvari church is an early example of a four apse church with four niches domed tetraconch. The Jvari church had a great impact on the further development of Georgian architecture and served as a model for many other churches.<br />
<br />
The Historical Monuments of Jvari Monastery Mtskheta is located in the cultural landscape overlooking the confluence of the Aragvi and Mtkvari Rivers, in Central-Eastern Georgia, some 20km northwest of Tbilisi.
  • Pictures & images of Jvari Monastery, a 6th century Georgian Orthodox monastery near Mtskheta, eastern Georgia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Jvari church is an early example of a four apse church with four niches domed tetraconch. The Jvari church had a great impact on the further development of Georgian architecture and served as a model for many other churches.<br />
<br />
The Historical Monuments of Jvari Monastery Mtskheta is located in the cultural landscape overlooking the confluence of the Aragvi and Mtkvari Rivers, in Central-Eastern Georgia, some 20km northwest of Tbilisi.
  • Pictures & images of Jvari Monastery, a 6th century Georgian Orthodox monastery near Mtskheta, eastern Georgia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Jvari church is an early example of a four apse church with four niches domed tetraconch. The Jvari church had a great impact on the further development of Georgian architecture and served as a model for many other churches.<br />
<br />
The Historical Monuments of Jvari Monastery Mtskheta is located in the cultural landscape overlooking the confluence of the Aragvi and Mtkvari Rivers, in Central-Eastern Georgia, some 20km northwest of Tbilisi.
  • Pictures & images of Jvari Monastery, a 6th century Georgian Orthodox monastery near Mtskheta, eastern Georgia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Jvari church is an early example of a four apse church with four niches domed tetraconch. The Jvari church had a great impact on the further development of Georgian architecture and served as a model for many other churches.<br />
<br />
The Historical Monuments of Jvari Monastery Mtskheta is located in the cultural landscape overlooking the confluence of the Aragvi and Mtkvari Rivers, in Central-Eastern Georgia, some 20km northwest of Tbilisi.
  • Pictures & images of Jvari Monastery, a 6th century Georgian Orthodox monastery near Mtskheta, eastern Georgia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Jvari church is an early example of a four apse church with four niches domed tetraconch. The Jvari church had a great impact on the further development of Georgian architecture and served as a model for many other churches.<br />
<br />
The Historical Monuments of Jvari Monastery Mtskheta is located in the cultural landscape overlooking the confluence of the Aragvi and Mtkvari Rivers, in Central-Eastern Georgia, some 20km northwest of Tbilisi.
  • Pictures & images of Jvari Monastery, a 6th century Georgian Orthodox monastery near Mtskheta, eastern Georgia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Jvari church is an early example of a four apse church with four niches domed tetraconch. The Jvari church had a great impact on the further development of Georgian architecture and served as a model for many other churches.<br />
<br />
The Historical Monuments of Jvari Monastery Mtskheta is located in the cultural landscape overlooking the confluence of the Aragvi and Mtkvari Rivers, in Central-Eastern Georgia, some 20km northwest of Tbilisi.
  • Pictures & images of Jvari Monastery, a 6th century Georgian Orthodox monastery near Mtskheta, eastern Georgia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Jvari church is an early example of a four apse church with four niches domed tetraconch. The Jvari church had a great impact on the further development of Georgian architecture and served as a model for many other churches.<br />
<br />
The Historical Monuments of Jvari Monastery Mtskheta is located in the cultural landscape overlooking the confluence of the Aragvi and Mtkvari Rivers, in Central-Eastern Georgia, some 20km northwest of Tbilisi.
  • Pictures & images of Jvari Monastery, a 6th century Georgian Orthodox monastery near Mtskheta, eastern Georgia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Jvari church is an early example of a four apse church with four niches domed tetraconch. The Jvari church had a great impact on the further development of Georgian architecture and served as a model for many other churches.<br />
<br />
The Historical Monuments of Jvari Monastery Mtskheta is located in the cultural landscape overlooking the confluence of the Aragvi and Mtkvari Rivers, in Central-Eastern Georgia, some 20km northwest of Tbilisi.
  • Pictures & images of Jvari Monastery, a 6th century Georgian Orthodox monastery near Mtskheta, eastern Georgia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Jvari church is an early example of a four apse church with four niches domed tetraconch. The Jvari church had a great impact on the further development of Georgian architecture and served as a model for many other churches.<br />
<br />
The Historical Monuments of Jvari Monastery Mtskheta is located in the cultural landscape overlooking the confluence of the Aragvi and Mtkvari Rivers, in Central-Eastern Georgia, some 20km northwest of Tbilisi.
  • Pictures & images of Jvari Monastery, a 6th century Georgian Orthodox monastery near Mtskheta, eastern Georgia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Jvari church is an early example of a four apse church with four niches domed tetraconch. The Jvari church had a great impact on the further development of Georgian architecture and served as a model for many other churches.<br />
<br />
The Historical Monuments of Jvari Monastery Mtskheta is located in the cultural landscape overlooking the confluence of the Aragvi and Mtkvari Rivers, in Central-Eastern Georgia, some 20km northwest of Tbilisi.
  • Pictures & images of Jvari Monastery, a 6th century Georgian Orthodox monastery near Mtskheta, eastern Georgia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Jvari church is an early example of a four apse church with four niches domed tetraconch. The Jvari church had a great impact on the further development of Georgian architecture and served as a model for many other churches.<br />
<br />
The Historical Monuments of Jvari Monastery Mtskheta is located in the cultural landscape overlooking the confluence of the Aragvi and Mtkvari Rivers, in Central-Eastern Georgia, some 20km northwest of Tbilisi.
  • Pictures & images of Jvari Monastery, a 6th century Georgian Orthodox monastery near Mtskheta, eastern Georgia. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.<br />
<br />
The Jvari church is an early example of a four apse church with four niches domed tetraconch. The Jvari church had a great impact on the further development of Georgian architecture and served as a model for many other churches.<br />
<br />
The Historical Monuments of Jvari Monastery Mtskheta is located in the cultural landscape overlooking the confluence of the Aragvi and Mtkvari Rivers, in Central-Eastern Georgia, some 20km northwest of Tbilisi.
  • Close up of the inscription dedicated to King Midas on the Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Unfinished rock monument of Midas, 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This rock facade was planned but never finished and so little is known about the unfinished Monument. It is also known locally as the Kucuk Yazilikaya ( “little written rock”), since it appears to have been planned as a smaller version of the Midas Monument, also called Yazilikaya. It measures 7m x 10m and faces west, unlike the other monument at Midas whose facades face east. Since it was never completed, it was gives some idea of the construction techniques : first the rock was flattened and then the facade was carved from the top down. The architectural frame and the ornament were carved at the same time. About  2m below the monument are a smaller facade, to the left and a small cut altar to the right.
  • The Unfinished rock monument of Midas, 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This rock facade was planned but never finished and so little is known about the unfinished Monument. It is also known locally as the Kucuk Yazilikaya ( “little written rock”), since it appears to have been planned as a smaller version of the Midas Monument, also called Yazilikaya. It measures 7m x 10m and faces west, unlike the other monument at Midas whose facades face east. Since it was never completed, it was gives some idea of the construction techniques : first the rock was flattened and then the facade was carved from the top down. The architectural frame and the ornament were carved at the same time. About  2m below the monument are a smaller facade, to the left and a small cut altar to the right.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Unfinished rock monument of Midas, 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This rock facade was planned but never finished and so little is known about the unfinished Monument. It is also known locally as the Kucuk Yazilikaya ( “little written rock”), since it appears to have been planned as a smaller version of the Midas Monument, also called Yazilikaya. It measures 7m x 10m and faces west, unlike the other monument at Midas whose facades face east. Since it was never completed, it was gives some idea of the construction techniques : first the rock was flattened and then the facade was carved from the top down. The architectural frame and the ornament were carved at the same time. About  2m below the monument are a smaller facade, to the left and a small cut altar to the right.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • Close up of the inscription dedicated to King Midas on the Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • Close up pictures & images of the socialist art of the Treaty of Georgievsk or Friendship Monument situated on the Georgian Military Highway high in the Caucasus mountains, Jvari Pass , Gudauri, Georgia (country).<br />
<br />
The Friendship Monument was built in 1983 to celebrate the bicentennial of the Treaty of Georgievsk and the ongoing friendship between Soviet Georgia and Soviet Russia.
  • The Memmius Monument was built in the 1st century B.C. to honour Mmmius, the grandson of Emperor Sulla and son of Caicus whose sculptures can be seen on the monument. Ephesus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • Close up pictures & images of the socialist art of the Treaty of Georgievsk or Friendship Monument situated on the Georgian Military Highway high in the Caucasus mountains, Jvari Pass , Gudauri, Georgia (country).<br />
<br />
The Friendship Monument was built in 1983 to celebrate the bicentennial of the Treaty of Georgievsk and the ongoing friendship between Soviet Georgia and Soviet Russia.
  • Close up pictures & images of the socialist art of the Treaty of Georgievsk or Friendship Monument situated on the Georgian Military Highway high in the Caucasus mountains, Jvari Pass , Gudauri, Georgia (country).<br />
<br />
The Friendship Monument was built in 1983 to celebrate the bicentennial of the Treaty of Georgievsk and the ongoing friendship between Soviet Georgia and Soviet Russia.
  • Close up pictures & images of the socialist art of the Treaty of Georgievsk or Friendship Monument situated on the Georgian Military Highway high in the Caucasus mountains, Jvari Pass , Gudauri, Georgia (country).<br />
<br />
The Friendship Monument was built in 1983 to celebrate the bicentennial of the Treaty of Georgievsk and the ongoing friendship between Soviet Georgia and Soviet Russia.
  • Close up pictures & images of the socialist art of the Treaty of Georgievsk or Friendship Monument situated on the Georgian Military Highway high in the Caucasus mountains, Jvari Pass , Gudauri, Georgia (country).<br />
<br />
The Friendship Monument was built in 1983 to celebrate the bicentennial of the Treaty of Georgievsk and the ongoing friendship between Soviet Georgia and Soviet Russia.
  • Close up pictures & images of the socialist art of the Treaty of Georgievsk or Friendship Monument situated on the Georgian Military Highway high in the Caucasus mountains, Jvari Pass , Gudauri, Georgia (country).<br />
<br />
The Friendship Monument was built in 1983 to celebrate the bicentennial of the Treaty of Georgievsk and the ongoing friendship between Soviet Georgia and Soviet Russia.
  • Close up pictures & images of the socialist art of the Treaty of Georgievsk or Friendship Monument situated on the Georgian Military Highway high in the Caucasus mountains, Jvari Pass , Gudauri, Georgia (country).<br />
<br />
The Friendship Monument was built in 1983 to celebrate the bicentennial of the Treaty of Georgievsk and the ongoing friendship between Soviet Georgia and Soviet Russia.
  • Close up pictures & images of the socialist art of the Treaty of Georgievsk or Friendship Monument situated on the Georgian Military Highway high in the Caucasus mountains, Jvari Pass , Gudauri, Georgia (country).<br />
<br />
The Friendship Monument was built in 1983 to celebrate the bicentennial of the Treaty of Georgievsk and the ongoing friendship between Soviet Georgia and Soviet Russia.
  • Close up pictures & images of the socialist art of the Treaty of Georgievsk or Friendship Monument situated on the Georgian Military Highway high in the Caucasus mountains, Jvari Pass , Gudauri, Georgia (country).<br />
<br />
The Friendship Monument was built in 1983 to celebrate the bicentennial of the Treaty of Georgievsk and the ongoing friendship between Soviet Georgia and Soviet Russia.
  • Close up pictures & images of the socialist art of the Treaty of Georgievsk or Friendship Monument situated on the Georgian Military Highway high in the Caucasus mountains, Jvari Pass , Gudauri, Georgia (country).<br />
<br />
The Friendship Monument was built in 1983 to celebrate the bicentennial of the Treaty of Georgievsk and the ongoing friendship between Soviet Georgia and Soviet Russia.
  • Close up pictures & images of the socialist art of the Treaty of Georgievsk or Friendship Monument situated on the Georgian Military Highway high in the Caucasus mountains, Jvari Pass , Gudauri, Georgia (country).<br />
<br />
The Friendship Monument was built in 1983 to celebrate the bicentennial of the Treaty of Georgievsk and the ongoing friendship between Soviet Georgia and Soviet Russia.
  • Pictures & images of the Treaty of Georgievsk or Friendship Monument situated on the Georgian Military Highway high in the Caucasus mountains, Jvari Pass , Gudauri, Georgia (country).<br />
<br />
The Friendship Monument was built in 1983 to celebrate the bicentennial of the Treaty of Georgievsk and the ongoing friendship between Soviet Georgia and Soviet Russia.
  • Pictures & images of the Treaty of Georgievsk or Friendship Monument situated on the Georgian Military Highway high in the Caucasus mountains, Jvari Pass , Gudauri, Georgia (country).<br />
<br />
The Friendship Monument was built in 1983 to celebrate the bicentennial of the Treaty of Georgievsk and the ongoing friendship between Soviet Georgia and Soviet Russia.
  • Pictures & images of the Treaty of Georgievsk or Friendship Monument situated on the Georgian Military Highway high in the Caucasus mountains, Jvari Pass , Gudauri, Georgia (country).<br />
<br />
The Friendship Monument was built in 1983 to celebrate the bicentennial of the Treaty of Georgievsk and the ongoing friendship between Soviet Georgia and Soviet Russia.
  • Stonehenge Neolithic ancient standing stone circle monument, Wilshire, England
  • Close up pictures & images of the socialist art of the Treaty of Georgievsk or Friendship Monument situated on the Georgian Military Highway high in the Caucasus mountains, Jvari Pass , Gudauri, Georgia (country).<br />
<br />
The Friendship Monument was built in 1983 to celebrate the bicentennial of the Treaty of Georgievsk and the ongoing friendship between Soviet Georgia and Soviet Russia.
  • Close up pictures & images of the socialist art of the Treaty of Georgievsk or Friendship Monument situated on the Georgian Military Highway high in the Caucasus mountains, Jvari Pass , Gudauri, Georgia (country).<br />
<br />
The Friendship Monument was built in 1983 to celebrate the bicentennial of the Treaty of Georgievsk and the ongoing friendship between Soviet Georgia and Soviet Russia.
  • Close up pictures & images of the socialist art of the Treaty of Georgievsk or Friendship Monument situated on the Georgian Military Highway high in the Caucasus mountains, Jvari Pass , Gudauri, Georgia (country).<br />
<br />
The Friendship Monument was built in 1983 to celebrate the bicentennial of the Treaty of Georgievsk and the ongoing friendship between Soviet Georgia and Soviet Russia.
  • Stonehenge Neolithic ancient standing stone circle monument, Wilshire, England
  • Stonehenge Neolithic ancient standing stone circle monument, Wilshire, England
  • Stonehenge Neolithic ancient standing stone circle monument, Wilshire, England
  • Stonehenge Neolithic ancient standing stone circle monument, Wilshire, England
  • Stonehenge Neolithic ancient standing stone circle monument, Wilshire, England
  • Stonehenge Neolithic ancient standing stone circle monument, Wilshire, England
  • Stonehenge Neolithic ancient standing stone circle monument, Wilshire, England
  • Stonehenge Neolithic ancient standing stone circle monument, Wilshire, England
  • Stonehenge Neolithic ancient standing stone circle monument, Wilshire, England
  • The Memmius Monument was built in the 1st century B.C. to honour Mmmius, the grandson of Emperor Sulla and son of Caicus whose sculptures can be seen on the monument. Ephesus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • Stonehenge Neolithic ancient standing stone circle monument, A UNESCO World Heritage Site, Wilshire, England
  • Stonehenge Neolithic ancient standing stone circle monument, A UNESCO World Heritage Site, Wilshire, England
  • Picture of the Hittite Hittite Fasillar Monument, finished replica of 13th century BC original. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey. Against a grey art background.<br />
<br />
The original is an unfinished monumental stele that is situated fiat on the back on a slope at the immediate vicinity of the village Fasillar within the Konya province, Beysehir. This is an exact replica of the original that was made of trachyte igneous rock. This represents the origin& that was cast into the mould of the same dimensions and colour. <br />
<br />
The height from the toes to the top of the lions is 7,40 meters. There is also a socket that is 80 cm. Long inserted into the basement. The Hittite monument dates from the end of 13th century BC There appears the great God higher than 4 meters stepping on the smaller mountain God that is accompanied by the lions on.
  • The Hittite Fasillar Monument, finished replica of 13th century BC original. Anatolian Civilizations Museum, Ankara, Turkey. Against a brown art background.<br />
<br />
The original is an unfinished monumental stele that is situated fiat on the back on a slope at the immediate vicinity of the village Fasillar within the Konya province, Beysehir. This is an exact replica of the original that was made of trachyte igneous rock. This represents the origin& that was cast into the mould of the same dimensions and colour. <br />
<br />
The height from the toes to the top of the lions is 7,40 meters. There is also a socket that is 80 cm. Long inserted into the basement. The Hittite monument dates from the end of 13th century BC There appears the great God higher than 4 meters stepping on the smaller mountain God that is accompanied by the lions on.
  • Stonehenge Neolithic ancient standing stone circle monument, A UNESCO World Heritage Site, Wilshire, England
  • Image of the Hittite Fasillar Monument, finished replica of 13th century BC original. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey. Against a white background.<br />
<br />
The original is an unfinished monumental stele that is situated fiat on the back on a slope at the immediate vicinity of the village Fasillar within the Konya province, Beysehir. This is an exact replica of the original that was made of trachyte igneous rock. This represents the origin& that was cast into the mould of the same dimensions and colour. <br />
<br />
The height from the toes to the top of the lions is 7,40 meters. There is also a socket that is 80 cm. Long inserted into the basement. The Hittite monument dates from the end of 13th century BC There appears the great God higher than 4 meters stepping on the smaller mountain God that is accompanied by the lions on.
  • Photo of the Hittite Fasillar Monument, finished replica of 13th century BC original. Anatolian Civilisations Museum, Ankara, Turkey. Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The original is an unfinished monumental stele that is situated fiat on the back on a slope at the immediate vicinity of the village Fasillar within the Konya province, Beysehir. This is an exact replica of the original that was made of trachyte igneous rock. This represents the origin& that was cast into the mould of the same dimensions and colour. <br />
<br />
The height from the toes to the top of the lions is 7,40 meters. There is also a socket that is 80 cm. Long inserted into the basement. The Hittite monument dates from the end of 13th century BC There appears the great God higher than 4 meters stepping on the smaller mountain God that is accompanied by the lions on.

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