• Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • Close up of the inscription dedicated to King Midas on the Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • The Phrygian rock Monument known locally as Yazilikaya, ( written rock ) . 8th - 6th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
This is the largest Phrygian rock cut facade monument, measuring 17m x 16.5m. It represents the front of a Phrygian megaron type building with a low pitched roof. It is known locally as yazilikaya , which means “written rock”, because of the Paleo-Phrygian inscriptions carved above the rock above the roof outline, down the right side and in the niche. The upper inscription dedicates the monument to King Midas, and so it is also known as the “Midas Monument”. The niche probably contained an image of the Phrygian Mother  Goddess, and the word “Matar” (Mother) is inscribed inside. The monument was carved  around the 8th and  6th century BC.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs cut into the rocks faces protecting the citadel of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian and later rock tombs of the necropolis of Midas . From the 8th century BC . Midas City, Yazilikaya, Eskisehir, Turkey.<br />
<br />
The earliest Phrygian settlement here began in the last quarter of the 8th century BC. Even after the Phrygian kingdom collapsed politically, the city was not abandoned and the Phrygian rock structures and tombs were conserved, with some additions and changes made.in the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods.
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Dogerr, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Döğer, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Döğer, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Döğer, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Doger, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Doger, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Doger, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Döğer, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • close up of the facade and relief sculptures of the Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Döğer, Turkey.<br />
<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • close up of the facade and relief sculptures of the Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Doger, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Close up of two sphinxes relief scul[ptures of the Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Doger, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Close up of two sphinxes relief scul[ptures of the Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Doger, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Döğer, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Close up of 2 standing lions of the Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Döğer, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Doger, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Döğer, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Sebasteion sanctuary building ruins and relief panels,  Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Sebasteion sanctuary building ruins and relief panels,  Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Sebasteion sanctuary building ruins and relief panels,  Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Sebasteion sanctuary building ruins and relief panels,  Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Sebasteion sanctuary building ruins and relief panels,  Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Sebasteion sanctuary building ruins and relief panels,  Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman sculpted frieze blocks with garland relief sculptures, North Portico, Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman sculpted frieze blocks with garland relief sculptures, North Portico, Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman sculpted frieze blocks with garland relief sculptures, North Portico, Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman sculpted frieze blocks with garland relief sculptures, North Portico, Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman sculpted frieze blocks with garland relief sculptures, North Portico, Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Theatre colonade of Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman theatre of Aphrodisias dedicated to Aphrodite and the people of the city by Julius Zoilos in the  2nd half of 1st century BC. Seats over 8000 people. Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman theatre of Aphrodisias dedicated to Aphrodite and the people of the city by Julius Zoilos in the  2nd half of 1st century BC. Seats over 8000 people. Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman theatre of Aphrodisias dedicated to Aphrodite and the people of the city by Julius Zoilos in the  2nd half of 1st century BC. Seats over 8000 people. Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman theatre of Aphrodisias dedicated to Aphrodite and the people of the city by Julius Zoilos in the  2nd half of 1st century BC. Seats over 8000 people. Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman theatre of Aphrodisias dedicated to Aphrodite and the people of the city by Julius Zoilos in the  2nd half of 1st century BC. Seats over 8000 people. Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman theatre of Aphrodisias dedicated to Aphrodite and the people of the city by Julius Zoilos in the  2nd half of 1st century BC. Seats over 8000 people. Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman theatre of Aphrodisias dedicated to Aphrodite and the people of the city by Julius Zoilos in the  2nd half of 1st century BC. Seats over 8000 people. Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman theatre of Aphrodisias dedicated to Aphrodite and the people of the city by Julius Zoilos in the  2nd half of 1st century BC. Seats over 8000 people. Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman theatre of Aphrodisias dedicated to Aphrodite and the people of the city by Julius Zoilos in the  2nd half of 1st century BC. Seats over 8000 people. Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman theatre of Aphrodisias dedicated to Aphrodite and the people of the city by Julius Zoilos in the  2nd half of 1st century BC. Seats over 8000 people. Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Odeon (Concert-hall) seating  around 1700 people. It was used also as the Bouleuterion for the meetings of the Senate and remained in this form until the early fifth century.<br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Odeon (Concert-hall) seating  around 1700 people. It was used also as the Bouleuterion for the meetings of the Senate and remained in this form until the early fifth century.<br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • The Temple of Aphrodite at the centre of Aphrodisias. All that remains of the ancient temple consists of fourteen of the over forty Ionic columns that once surrounded it and the foundations of the cellar section. building started in the 1st century BC completed during the reign of Augustus. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • The Temple of Aphrodite at the centre of Aphrodisias. All that remains of the ancient temple consists of fourteen of the over forty Ionic columns that once surrounded it and the foundations of the cellar section. building started in the 1st century BC completed during the reign of Augustus. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • The Temple of Aphrodite at the centre of Aphrodisias. All that remains of the ancient temple consists of fourteen of the over forty Ionic columns that once surrounded it and the foundations of the cellar section. building started in the 1st century BC completed during the reign of Augustus. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • The Temple of Aphrodite at the centre of Aphrodisias. All that remains of the ancient temple consists of fourteen of the over forty Ionic columns that once surrounded it and the foundations of the cellar section. building started in the 1st century BC completed during the reign of Augustus. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • The Temple of Aphrodite at the centre of Aphrodisias. All that remains of the ancient temple consists of fourteen of the over forty Ionic columns that once surrounded it and the foundations of the cellar section. building started in the 1st century BC completed during the reign of Augustus. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • The Temple of Aphrodite at the centre of Aphrodisias. All that remains of the ancient temple consists of fourteen of the over forty Ionic columns that once surrounded it and the foundations of the cellar section. building started in the 1st century BC completed during the reign of Augustus. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • The Temple of Aphrodite at the centre of Aphrodisias. All that remains of the ancient temple consists of fourteen of the over forty Ionic columns that once surrounded it and the foundations of the cellar section. building started in the 1st century BC completed during the reign of Augustus. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • The Temple of Aphrodite at the centre of Aphrodisias. All that remains of the ancient temple consists of fourteen of the over forty Ionic columns that once surrounded it and the foundations of the cellar section. building started in the 1st century BC completed during the reign of Augustus. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • The Temple of Aphrodite at the centre of Aphrodisias. All that remains of the ancient temple consists of fourteen of the over forty Ionic columns that once surrounded it and the foundations of the cellar section. building started in the 1st century BC completed during the reign of Augustus. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • The Temple of Aphrodite at the centre of Aphrodisias. All that remains of the ancient temple consists of fourteen of the over forty Ionic columns that once surrounded it and the foundations of the cellar section. building started in the 1st century BC completed during the reign of Augustus. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • The Temple of Aphrodite at the centre of Aphrodisias. All that remains of the ancient temple consists of fourteen of the over forty Ionic columns that once surrounded it and the foundations of the cellar section. building started in the 1st century BC completed during the reign of Augustus. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • The Temple of Aphrodite at the centre of Aphrodisias. All that remains of the ancient temple consists of fourteen of the over forty Ionic columns that once surrounded it and the foundations of the cellar section. building started in the 1st century BC completed during the reign of Augustus. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • The Temple of Aphrodite at the centre of Aphrodisias. All that remains of the ancient temple consists of fourteen of the over forty Ionic columns that once surrounded it and the foundations of the cellar section. building started in the 1st century BC completed during the reign of Augustus. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Close up of the pediments of the Tetrapylon monumental gateway to  the Temple of Aphrodite. The Tetrapylon consisted of four rows of four columns and It connects the major street to the sacred way heading toward the sanctuary of Aphrodite. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Close up of the pediments of the Tetrapylon monumental gateway to  the Temple of Aphrodite. The Tetrapylon consisted of four rows of four columns and It connects the major street to the sacred way heading toward the sanctuary of Aphrodite. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Tetrapylon monumental gateway to  the Temple of Aphrodite. The Tetrapylon consisted of four rows of four columns and It connects the major street to the sacred way heading toward the sanctuary of Aphrodite. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Tetrapylon monumental gateway to  the Temple of Aphrodite. The Tetrapylon consisted of four rows of four columns and It connects the major street to the sacred way heading toward the sanctuary of Aphrodite. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Tetrapylon monumental gateway to  the Temple of Aphrodite. The Tetrapylon consisted of four rows of four columns and It connects the major street to the sacred way heading toward the sanctuary of Aphrodite. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Tetrapylon monumental gateway to  the Temple of Aphrodite. The Tetrapylon consisted of four rows of four columns and It connects the major street to the sacred way heading toward the sanctuary of Aphrodite. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Tetrapylon monumental gateway to  the Temple of Aphrodite. The Tetrapylon consisted of four rows of four columns and It connects the major street to the sacred way heading toward the sanctuary of Aphrodite. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Tetrapylon monumental gateway to  the Temple of Aphrodite. The Tetrapylon consisted of four rows of four columns and It connects the major street to the sacred way heading toward the sanctuary of Aphrodite. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Tetrapylon monumental gateway to  the Temple of Aphrodite. The Tetrapylon consisted of four rows of four columns and It connects the major street to the sacred way heading toward the sanctuary of Aphrodite. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman ruins of the circus stadium of Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman ruins of the circus stadium of Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Tetrapylon monumental gateway to  the Temple of Aphrodite. The Tetrapylon consisted of four rows of four columns and It connects the major street to the sacred way heading toward the sanctuary of Aphrodite. <br />
<br />
Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Roman ruins of the circus stadium of Aphrodisias Archaeological Site, Aydin Province, Turkey.
  • Picture of the Roman Basilica Baths. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.
  • Picture of Roman sacrcophagi on a Tomb North Necropolis. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.
  • Picture of Tombs on the edge of the white travatines of the  North Necropolis. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.
  • Picture of Tomb North Necropolis  main road . Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.
  • Picture of Tomb Tomb 114 "tomb of curses" of the North Necropolis. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.<br />
<br />
TOMB 114 (Second half of the 2nd century AD) <br />
<br />
The tomb lies on the left hand side of the road and is enclosed by a perimeter wall; it rests on a base withifiree steps, with a bench piked(1 front of it. Inside are three beds and the ossuary. On the roof, a sarcophagus, broken as result of an <br />
earthquake, bears an inscription mentioning the occupant Aelios Apollinarios and his wife Neratia Apollonis. On the facade is an inscription of great interest which refers to the punishment inflicted on those who violate the sepulchre: as well as the usual fines, it invokes diseases, misfortunes and punishments in the next world. This inscription has led to the building being named the Tomb of the Curses.
  • Picture of Tomb  81 of North Necropolis. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.<br />
<br />
Tomb 81 (2nd - 3rd centuries AD)<br />
The tomb is built on a high platform that compensates for <br />
difference in level of the land behind it. Inside the <br />
chamber are three sepulchre beds, arranged along the walls, an a very deep ossuary. On the roof slabs, which jut out a long way, are two sarcophagi. Two inscriptions beside the door end the inscription on the slab that closed it (now in the museum ) refer to the successive occupants, including Eutyches Pompeios, who left 100 denari to the association of wool washers for the periodic decoration of  <br />
the tomb.
  • Picture of Tombs North Necropolis. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.
  • Picture of a Tomb North Necropolis. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.
  • Picture of a Roman raised sarcophagus of the North Necropolis. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.
  • Picture of a Roman raised sarcophagus of the North Necropolis. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.
  • Picture of a Tomb A6  and Sarcophagus of the North Necropolis. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.
  • Picture of a Roman raised sarcophagus of the North Necropolis. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.
  • Picture of  A18 of the Tomb North Necropolis. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.<br />
<br />
Tomb A 18 ( 1st century AD) <br />
<br />
The building, one of the most representative and best conserved of the North Necropolis, has the shape of a small temple, built to a square plan with regular walls. The facade is framed by projecting pilasters; the roofing slabs rest on the, two frontons and the lateral cornices.- Beneath the base is a subterranean chamber partially carved into of the rock. The two chambers have sepulchral beds along the walls.
  • Picture of  A18 of the Tomb North Necropolis. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.<br />
<br />
Tomb A 18 ( 1st century AD) <br />
<br />
The building, one of the most representative and best conserved of the North Necropolis, has the shape of a small temple, built to a square plan with regular walls. The facade is framed by projecting pilasters; the roofing slabs rest on the, two frontons and the lateral cornices.- Beneath the base is a subterranean chamber partially carved into of the rock. The two chambers have sepulchral beds along the walls.
  • Picture of a Tomb  North Necropolis. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.
  • Picture of Tomb A2 of the North Necropolis. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.
  • Picture of Tomb A2 of the North Necropolis. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.
  • Picture of The north  gate forms part of a fortification system built at Hierapolis in late 4th century Theodosian times. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.
  • Picture of The north  gate forms part of a fortification system built at Hierapolis in late 4th century Theodosian times. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.
  • Picture of The north Byzantine gate forms part of a fortification system built at Hierapolis in late 4th century Theodosian times. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.
  • Picture of the Roman North Gate built by Domitian. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.
  • Picture of St Philip Gate road.  Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.
  • Picture of the Roman North Gate built by Domitian. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.
  • Picture of the Roman North Gate built by Domitian. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.
  • Picture of St Philip Gate ruins.  Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.<br />
<br />
The St. Philip Gate <br />
The gate is situated on the north-eastern side of the defensive walls built under the Emperor Theodosius in the late 4th century. Its importance is indicated by the presence of the two towers that flank the opening The gate was used by pilgrims heading for the summit of the hill on which stood the sanctuary of St. Philip, one of the twelve apostles of Christ. According to tradition the Saint was martyred in Hierapolis.
  • Picture of St Philip Gate ruins.  Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.<br />
<br />
The St. Philip Gate <br />
The gate is situated on the north-eastern side of the defensive walls built under the Emperor Theodosius in the late 4th century. Its importance is indicated by the presence of the two towers that flank the opening The gate was used by pilgrims heading for the summit of the hill on which stood the sanctuary of St. Philip, one of the twelve apostles of Christ. According to tradition the Saint was martyred in Hierapolis.
  • Greek Theatre remodelled in 225-200 BC & again in 175 BC, 68 AD & 299 AD to a width of 139.8 meters to seat 18,500 people. <br />
Miletus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • Greek Theatre remodelled in 225-200 BC & again in 175 BC, 68 AD & 299 AD to a width of 139.8 meters to seat 18,500 people. <br />
Miletus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • Greek Theatre remodelled in 225-200 BC & again in 175 BC, 68 AD & 299 AD to a width of 139.8 meters to seat 18,500 people. <br />
Miletus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • Greek Theatre remodelled in 225-200 BC & again in 175 BC, 68 AD & 299 AD to a width of 139.8 meters to seat 18,500 people. <br />
Miletus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • Greek Theatre remodelled in 225-200 BC & again in 175 BC, 68 AD & 299 AD to a width of 139.8 meters to seat 18,500 people. <br />
Miletus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • Greek Theatre remodelled in 225-200 BC & again in 175 BC, 68 AD & 299 AD to a width of 139.8 meters to seat 18,500 people. <br />
Miletus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • Greek Theatre remodelled in 225-200 BC & again in 175 BC, 68 AD & 299 AD to a width of 139.8 meters to seat 18,500 people. <br />
Miletus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • Greek Theatre remodelled in 225-200 BC & again in 175 BC, 68 AD & 299 AD to a width of 139.8 meters to seat 18,500 people. <br />
Miletus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • Greek Theatre remodelled in 225-200 BC & again in 175 BC, 68 AD & 299 AD to a width of 139.8 meters to seat 18,500 people. <br />
Miletus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • Greek Theatre remodelled in 225-200 BC & again in 175 BC, 68 AD & 299 AD to a width of 139.8 meters to seat 18,500 people. <br />
Miletus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • Greek Theatre Frieze - Miletus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • Roman Great Harbour Monument opened by the city of Miletus either in honour of the achievements of Pompeius in his war against the pirates (67 BC) or for the victory of Augustus over Mark Antony and Cleopatra in the battle of Actium (31 BC). Miletus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • Roman Great Harbour Monument opened by the city of Miletus either in honour of the achievements of Pompeius in his war against the pirates (67 BC) or for the victory of Augustus over Mark Antony and Cleopatra in the battle of Actium (31 BC). Miletus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • Roman Great Harbour Monument opened by the city of Miletus either in honour of the achievements of Pompeius in his war against the pirates (67 BC) or for the victory of Augustus over Mark Antony and Cleopatra in the battle of Actium (31 BC). Miletus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • Islamic Prayer Hall. Miletus Archaeological Site, Anatilia, Turkey.
  • The Roman Ionic Stoa forms a colonnade 99 m long & 9 m high at the beginning of the Sacred Way to Didyma. An Ionic portica at its centre which served as a grandstand during ceremonial processions on the street in front of it. 1st century AD, Miletus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • The Roman Ionic Stoa forms a colonnade 99 m long & 9 m high at the beginning of the Sacred Way to Didyma. An Ionic portica at its centre which served as a grandstand during ceremonial processions on the street in front of it. 1st century AD, Miletus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • The Roman Ionic Stoa forms a colonnade 99 m long & 9 m high at the beginning of the Sacred Way to Didyma. An Ionic portica at its centre which served as a grandstand during ceremonial processions on the street in front of it. 1st century AD, Miletus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • The Roman Ionic Stoa forms a colonnade 99 m long & 9 m high at the beginning of the Sacred Way to Didyma. An Ionic portica at its centre which served as a grandstand during ceremonial processions on the street in front of it. 1st century AD, Miletus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • The Roman Ionic Stoa forms a colonnade 99 m long & 9 m high at the beginning of the Sacred Way to Didyma. An Ionic portica at its centre which served as a grandstand during ceremonial processions on the street in front of it. 1st century AD, Miletus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • The Roman Ionic Stoa forms a colonnade 99 m long & 9 m high at the beginning of the Sacred Way to Didyma. An Ionic portica at its centre which served as a grandstand during ceremonial processions on the street in front of it. 1st century AD, Miletus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • The Roman Ionic Stoa forms a colonnade 99 m long & 9 m high at the beginning of the Sacred Way to Didyma. An Ionic portica at its centre which served as a grandstand during ceremonial processions on the street in front of it. 1st century AD, Miletus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • The Roman Ionic Stoa forms a colonnade 99 m long & 9 m high at the beginning of the Sacred Way to Didyma. An Ionic portica at its centre which served as a grandstand during ceremonial processions on the street in front of it. 1st century AD, Miletus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • The Roman Ionic Stoa forms a colonnade 99 m long & 9 m high at the beginning of the Sacred Way to Didyma. An Ionic portica at its centre which served as a grandstand during ceremonial processions on the street in front of it. 1st century AD, Miletus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • The Roman Ionic Stoa forms a colonnade 99 m long & 9 m high at the beginning of the Sacred Way to Didyma. An Ionic portica at its centre which served as a grandstand during ceremonial processions on the street in front of it. 1st century AD, Miletus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • The Roman Ionic Stoa forms a colonnade 99 m long & 9 m high at the beginning of the Sacred Way to Didyma. An Ionic portica at its centre which served as a grandstand during ceremonial processions on the street in front of it. 1st century AD, Miletus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • The Roman Ionic Stoa forms a colonnade 99 m long & 9 m high at the beginning of the Sacred Way to Didyma. An Ionic portica at its centre which served as a grandstand during ceremonial processions on the street in front of it. 1st century AD, Miletus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • The Roman Ionic Stoa forms a colonnade 99 m long & 9 m high at the beginning of the Sacred Way to Didyma. An Ionic portica at its centre which served as a grandstand during ceremonial processions on the street in front of it. 1st century AD, Miletus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • The Roman Ionic Stoa forms a colonnade 99 m long & 9 m high at the beginning of the Sacred Way to Didyma. An Ionic portica at its centre which served as a grandstand during ceremonial processions on the street in front of it. 1st century AD, Miletus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • The Roman Ionic Stoa forms a colonnade 99 m long & 9 m high at the beginning of the Sacred Way to Didyma. An Ionic portica at its centre which served as a grandstand during ceremonial processions on the street in front of it. 1st century AD, Miletus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • The Roman Ionic Stoa forms a colonnade 99 m long & 9 m high at the beginning of the Sacred Way to Didyma. An Ionic portica at its centre which served as a grandstand during ceremonial processions on the street in front of it. 1st century AD, Miletus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • The Roman Ionic Stoa forms a colonnade 99 m long & 9 m high at the beginning of the Sacred Way to Didyma. An Ionic portica at its centre which served as a grandstand during ceremonial processions on the street in front of it. 1st century AD, Miletus Archaeological Site, Anatolia, Turkey.
  • Ruins of the Heroon III. Miletus Archaeological Site, Anatilia, Turkey.
  • Roman Baths of Faustina established by Faustina the Younger, wife of the Emperor Marcus Aurelius (161-180 AD). Miletus Archaeological Site, Anatilia, Turkey.
  • Roman Baths of Faustina established by Faustina the Younger, wife of the Emperor Marcus Aurelius (161-180 AD). Miletus Archaeological Site, Anatilia, Turkey.
  • Roman Baths of Faustina established by Faustina the Younger, wife of the Emperor Marcus Aurelius (161-180 AD). Miletus Archaeological Site, Anatilia, Turkey.
  • Roman Baths of Faustina established by Faustina the Younger, wife of the Emperor Marcus Aurelius (161-180 AD). Miletus Archaeological Site, Anatilia, Turkey.
  • Roman Baths of Faustina established by Faustina the Younger, wife of the Emperor Marcus Aurelius (161-180 AD). Miletus Archaeological Site, Anatilia, Turkey.
  • Roman Baths of Faustina established by Faustina the Younger, wife of the Emperor Marcus Aurelius (161-180 AD). Miletus Archaeological Site, Anatilia, Turkey.
  • Roman Baths of Faustina established by Faustina the Younger, wife of the Emperor Marcus Aurelius (161-180 AD). Miletus Archaeological Site, Anatilia, Turkey.
  • Roman Baths of Faustina established by Faustina the Younger, wife of the Emperor Marcus Aurelius (161-180 AD). Miletus Archaeological Site, Anatilia, Turkey.
  • Roman Baths of Faustina established by Faustina the Younger, wife of the Emperor Marcus Aurelius (161-180 AD). Miletus Archaeological Site, Anatilia, Turkey.
  • The marble crown gate of the Sifaiye Medrese has a very rich decorative appearance, 1217. Its islamic Muqarnas corbelled vault is made up of a large number of miniature squinches, producing a sort of cellular structure. Sivas, Turkey
  • The Buruciye Medrese (Madrasah) built in 1271 by Dr. Muzaffer Burucerdî of Iran as a school teach physics, chemistry and astronomy. Its magnificent crown gate is one of the best examples of Seljuk architecture in Anatolia. The islamic Muqarnas corbelled vault is made up of a large number of miniature squinches, producing a sort of cellular structure. Sivas, Turkey
  • The Buruciye Medrese (Madrasah) built in 1271 by Dr. Muzaffer Burucerdî of Iran as a school teach physics, chemistry and astronomy. Its magnificent crown gate is one of the best examples of Seljuk architecture in Anatolia. The islamic Muqarnas corbelled vault is made up of a large number of miniature squinches, producing a sort of cellular structure. Sivas, Turkey
  • Close up of the Crown Gate of the Buruciye Medrese (Madrasah) built in 1271 by Dr. Muzaffer Burucerdî of Iran as a school teach physics, chemistry and astronomy. Its magnificent crown gate is one of the best examples of Seljuk architecture in Anatolia. The islamic Muqarnas corbelled vault is made up of a large number of miniature squinches, producing a sort of cellular structure. Sivas, Turkey
  • The Buruciye Medrese (Madrasah) built in 1271 by Dr. Muzaffer Burucerdî of Iran as a school teach physics, chemistry and astronomy. Its magnificent crown gate is one of the best examples of Seljuk architecture in Anatolia. The islamic Muqarnas corbelled vault is made up of a large number of miniature squinches, producing a sort of cellular structure. Sivas, Turkey
  • Close up of the Crown Gate of the Buruciye Medrese (Madrasah) built in 1271 by Dr. Muzaffer Burucerdî of Iran as a school teach physics, chemistry and astronomy. Its magnificent crown gate is one of the best examples of Seljuk architecture in Anatolia. The islamic Muqarnas corbelled vault is made up of a large number of miniature squinches, producing a sort of cellular structure. Sivas, Turkey
  • Close up of the Crown Gate of the Buruciye Medrese (Madrasah) built in 1271 by Dr. Muzaffer Burucerdî of Iran as a school teach physics, chemistry and astronomy. Its magnificent crown gate is one of the best examples of Seljuk architecture in Anatolia. The islamic Muqarnas corbelled vault is made up of a large number of miniature squinches, producing a sort of cellular structure. Sivas, Turkey
  • Close up of the Crown Gate of the Buruciye Medrese (Madrasah) built in 1271 by Dr. Muzaffer Burucerdî of Iran as a school teach physics, chemistry and astronomy. Its magnificent crown gate is one of the best examples of Seljuk architecture in Anatolia. The islamic Muqarnas corbelled vault is made up of a large number of miniature squinches, producing a sort of cellular structure. Sivas, Turkey
  • Close up of the Crown Gate of the Buruciye Medrese (Madrasah) built in 1271 by Dr. Muzaffer Burucerdî of Iran as a school teach physics, chemistry and astronomy. Its magnificent crown gate is one of the best examples of Seljuk architecture in Anatolia. The islamic Muqarnas corbelled vault is made up of a large number of miniature squinches, producing a sort of cellular structure. Sivas, Turkey
  • Close up of the Crown Gate of the Buruciye Medrese (Madrasah) built in 1271 by Dr. Muzaffer Burucerdî of Iran as a school teach physics, chemistry and astronomy. Its magnificent crown gate is one of the best examples of Seljuk architecture in Anatolia. The islamic Muqarnas corbelled vault is made up of a large number of miniature squinches, producing a sort of cellular structure. Sivas, Turkey
  • Close up of the Crown Gate of the Buruciye Medrese (Madrasah) built in 1271 by Dr. Muzaffer Burucerdî of Iran as a school teach physics, chemistry and astronomy. Its magnificent crown gate is one of the best examples of Seljuk architecture in Anatolia. The islamic Muqarnas corbelled vault is made up of a large number of miniature squinches, producing a sort of cellular structure. Sivas, Turkey
  • Close up of the Crown Gate of the Buruciye Medrese (Madrasah) built in 1271 by Dr. Muzaffer Burucerdî of Iran as a school teach physics, chemistry and astronomy. Its magnificent crown gate is one of the best examples of Seljuk architecture in Anatolia. The islamic Muqarnas corbelled vault is made up of a large number of miniature squinches, producing a sort of cellular structure. Sivas, Turkey
  • Close up of the Crown Gate of the Buruciye Medrese (Madrasah) built in 1271 by Dr. Muzaffer Burucerdî of Iran as a school teach physics, chemistry and astronomy. Its magnificent crown gate is one of the best examples of Seljuk architecture in Anatolia. The islamic Muqarnas corbelled vault is made up of a large number of miniature squinches, producing a sort of cellular structure. Sivas, Turkey
  • Door of Gök Medrese which has a very rich decorative appearance. Its islamic Muqarnas corbelled vault is made up of a large number of miniature squinches, producing a sort of cellular structure. The crown gate of Gök Medrese is one of the best examples of Sejuk architecture in Anatolia, Sivas, Turkey
  • Door of Gök Medrese which has a very rich decorative appearance. Its islamic Muqarnas corbelled vault is made up of a large number of miniature squinches, producing a sort of cellular structure. The crown gate of Gök Medrese is one of the best examples of Sejuk architecture in Anatolia, Sivas, Turkey
  • Door of Gök Medrese which has a very rich decorative appearance. Its islamic Muqarnas corbelled vault is made up of a large number of miniature squinches, producing a sort of cellular structure. The crown gate of Gök Medrese is one of the best examples of Sejuk architecture in Anatolia, Sivas, Turkey
  • Door of Gök Medrese which has a very rich decorative appearance. Its islamic Muqarnas corbelled vault is made up of a large number of miniature squinches, producing a sort of cellular structure. The crown gate of Gök Medrese is one of the best examples of Sejuk architecture in Anatolia, Sivas, Turkey
  • Door of Gök Medrese which has a very rich decorative appearance. Its islamic Muqarnas corbelled vault is made up of a large number of miniature squinches, producing a sort of cellular structure. The crown gate of Gök Medrese is one of the best examples of Sejuk architecture in Anatolia, Sivas, Turkey
  • Door of Gök Medrese which has a very rich decorative appearance. Its islamic Muqarnas corbelled vault is made up of a large number of miniature squinches, producing a sort of cellular structure. The crown gate of Gök Medrese is one of the best examples of Sejuk architecture in Anatolia, Sivas, Turkey
  • Door of Gök Medrese which has a very rich decorative appearance. Its islamic Muqarnas corbelled vault is made up of a large number of miniature squinches, producing a sort of cellular structure. The crown gate of Gök Medrese is one of the best examples of Sejuk architecture in Anatolia, Sivas, Turkey
  • The marble crown gate of Gök Medrese has a very rich decorative appearance. Its islamic Muqarnas corbelled vault is made up of a large number of miniature squinches, producing a sort of cellular structure. The crown gate of Gök Medrese is one of the best examples of Sejuk architecture in Anatolia, Sivas, Turkey
  • The marble crown gate of Gök Medrese has a very rich decorative appearance. Its islamic Muqarnas corbelled vault is made up of a large number of miniature squinches, producing a sort of cellular structure. The crown gate of Gök Medrese is one of the best examples of Sejuk architecture in Anatolia, Sivas, Turkey
  • Close up of the richly decorated corner stoes of the  of Gök Medrese , Sivas, Turkey
  • Close up of the richly decorated corner stoes of the  of Gök Medrese , Sivas, Turkey
  • The Gökmedrese or Gök Medrese built in 1271 by Vizier Ata Faahreddin Ali. close up of the corner seljuk stone work. Sivas, Turkey
  • The Gökmedrese or Gök Medrese built in 1271 by Vizier Ata Faahreddin Ali. close up of the corner seljuk stone work. Sivas, Turkey
  • The Gökmedrese or Gök Medrese built in 1271 by Vizier Ata Faahreddin Ali. Above the crown door are two minarets with a bow and single cone decorated with glazed bricks and tiles. Sivas, Turkey
  • The Gökmedrese or Gök Medrese built in 1271 by Vizier Ata Faahreddin Ali. Above the crown door are two minarets with a bow and single cone decorated with glazed bricks and tiles. Sivas, Turkey
  • The Gökmedrese or Gök Medrese built in 1271 by Vizier Ata Faahreddin Ali. Above the crown door are two minarets with a bow and single cone decorated with glazed bricks and tiles. Sivas, Turkey
  • The Gökmedrese or Gök Medrese built in 1271 by Vizier Ata Faahreddin Ali. Above the crown door are two minarets with a bow and single cone decorated with glazed bricks and tiles. Sivas, Turkey
  • The Gökmedrese or Gök Medrese built in 1271 by Vizier Ata Faahreddin Ali. Above the crown door are two minarets with a bow and single cone decorated with glazed bricks and tiles. Sivas, Turkey
  • The Gökmedrese or Gök Medrese built in 1271 by Vizier Ata Faahreddin Ali. Above the crown door are two minarets with a bow and single cone decorated with glazed bricks and tiles. Sivas, Turkey
  • The Gökmedrese or Gök Medrese built in 1271 by Vizier Ata Faahreddin Ali. Above the crown door are two minarets with a bow and single cone decorated with glazed bricks and tiles. Sivas, Turkey
  • The Gökmedrese or Gök Medrese built in 1271 by Vizier Ata Faahreddin Ali. Above the crown door are two minarets with a bow and single cone decorated with glazed bricks and tiles. Sivas, Turkey
  • The Gökmedrese or Gök Medrese built in 1271 by Vizier Ata Faahreddin Ali. Above the crown door are two minarets with a bow and single cone decorated with glazed bricks and tiles. Sivas, Turkey
  • The Gökmedrese or Gök Medrese built in 1271 by Vizier Ata Faahreddin Ali. Above the crown door are two minarets with a bow and single cone decorated with glazed bricks and tiles. Sivas, Turkey
  • The Gökmedrese or Gök Medrese built in 1271 by Vizier Ata Faahreddin Ali. Above the crown door are two minarets with a bow and single cone decorated with glazed bricks and tiles. Sivas, Turkey
  • The Gökmedrese or Gök Medrese built in 1271 by Vizier Ata Faahreddin Ali. Above the crown door are two minarets with a bow and single cone decorated with glazed bricks and tiles. Sivas, Turkey
  • The Gökmedrese or Gök Medrese built in 1271 by Vizier Ata Faahreddin Ali. Above the crown door are two minarets with a bow and single cone decorated with glazed bricks and tiles. Sivas, Turkey
  • The Gökmedrese or Gök Medrese built in 1271 by Vizier Ata Faahreddin Ali. Above the crown door are two minarets with a bow and single cone decorated with glazed bricks and tiles. Sivas, Turkey
  • The Gökmedrese or Gök Medrese built in 1271 by Vizier Ata Faahreddin Ali. Above the crown door are two minarets with a bow and single cone decorated with glazed bricks and tiles. Sivas, Turkey
  • The Gökmedrese or Gök Medrese built in 1271 by Vizier Ata Faahreddin Ali. Above the crown door are two minarets with a bow and single cone decorated with glazed bricks and tiles. Sivas, Turkey
  • The Gökmedrese or Gök Medrese built in 1271 by Vizier Ata Faahreddin Ali. Above the crown door are two minarets with a bow and single cone decorated with glazed bricks and tiles. Sivas, Turkey
  • The Gökmedrese or Gök Medrese built in 1271 by Vizier Ata Faahreddin Ali. Above the crown door are two minarets with a bow and single cone decorated with glazed bricks and tiles. Sivas, Turkey
  • The Gökmedrese or Gök Medrese built in 1271 by Vizier Ata Faahreddin Ali. Above the crown door are two minarets with a bow and single cone decorated with glazed bricks and tiles. Sivas, Turkey
  • The Gökmedrese or Gök Medrese built in 1271 by Vizier Ata Faahreddin Ali. Above the crown door are two minarets with a bow and single cone decorated with glazed bricks and tiles. Sivas, Turkey
  • The Gökmedrese or Gök Medrese built in 1271 by Vizier Ata Faahreddin Ali. Above the crown door are two minarets with a bow and single cone decorated with glazed bricks and tiles. Sivas, Turkey
  • Royal rock tombs of Pontus including Mithridates I, died 266 BC. Amasya, Turkey
  • Royal rock tombs of Pontus including Mithridates I, died 266 BC. Amasya, Turkey
  • Royal rock tombs of Pontus including Mithridates I, died 266 BC. Amasya, Turkey
  • Royal rock tombs of Pontus including Mithridates I, died 266 BC. Amasya, Turkey
  • Ottoman villas of Amasya along the banks of the river Yeşilırmak, below the Pontic Royal rock tombs and mountain top ancient citadel at sunset, Turkey
  • Ottoman villas of Amasya along the banks of the river Yeşilırmak, below the Pontic Royal rock tombs and mountain top ancient citadel at sunrise, Turkey
  • Ottoman villas of Amasya along the banks of the river Yesilırmak , below the Pontic Royal rock tombs and mountain top ancient citadel, Turkey
  • Ottoman villas of Amasya along the banks of the river Yesilırmak , below the Pontic Royal rock tombs and mountain top ancient citadel, Turkey
  • Ottoman villas of Amasya along the banks of the river Yeşilırmak, below the Pontic Royal rock tombs and mountain top ancient citadel at sunrise, Turkey
  • Ottoman villas of Amasya along the banks of the river Yeşilırmak, below the Pontic Royal rock tombs and mountain top ancient citadel, Turkey
  • Ottoman villas of Amasya along the banks of the river Yeşilırmak, below the Pontic Royal rock tombs and mountain top ancient citadel, Turkey
  • Ottoman villas of Amasya along the banks of the river Yeşilırmak, below the Pontic Royal rock tombs and mountain top ancient citadel at sunrise, Turkey
  • Ottoman villas of Amasya along the banks of the river Yeşilırmak, below the Pontic Royal rock tombs and mountain top ancient citadel, Turkey
  • Ottoman villas of Amasya along the banks of the river Yesilırmak k, below the Pontic Royal rock tombs and mountain top ancient citadel, Turkey
  • Ottoman villas of Amasya along the banks of the river Yeşilırmak, below the Pontic Royal rock tombs and mountain top ancient citadel, Turkey
  • Ottoman villas of Amasya along the banks of the river Yeşilırmak, below the Pontic Royal rock tombs and mountain top ancient citadel, Turkey
  • Ottoman villas of Amasya along the banks of the river Yeşilırmak, below the Pontic Royal rock tombs and mountain top ancient citadel, Turkey
  • Ottoman villas of Amasya along the banks of the river Yeşilırmak, below the Pontic Royal rock tombs and mountain top ancient citadel, Turkey
  • Ottoman villas of Amasya along the banks of the river Yeşilırmak, below the Pontic Royal rock tombs and mountain top ancient citadel, Turkey
  • Ottoman villas of Amasya along the banks of the river Yeşilırmak, below the Pontic Royal rock tombs and mountain top ancient citadel at sunrise, Turkey
  • Ottoman villas of Amasya along the banks of the river Yeşilırmak, below the Pontic Royal rock tombs and mountain top ancient citadel, Turkey
  • Ottoman villas of Amasya along the banks of the river Yeşilırmak, below the Pontic Royal rock tombs and mountain top ancient citadel, Turkey
  • Ottoman villas of Amasya along the banks of the river Yeşilırmak, below the Pontic Royal rock tombs and mountain top ancient citadel at sunrise, Turkey
  • Ottoman villas of Amasya along the banks of the river Yeşilırmak, below the Pontic Royal rock tombs and mountain top ancient citadel, Turkey
  • Ottoman villas of Amasya along the banks of the river Yeşilırmak, below the Pontic Royal rock tombs and mountain top ancient citadel, Turkey
  • Ottoman villas of Amasya along the banks of the river Yeşilırmak, below the Pontic Royal rock tombs and mountain top ancient citadel, Turkey
  • Ottoman villas of Amasya along the banks of the river Yesilırmak , below the Pontic Royal rock tombs and mountain top ancient citadel, Turkey
  • Ottoman villas of Amasya along the banks of the river Yeşilırmak, below the Pontic Royal rock tombs and mountain top ancient citadel, Turkey
  • Ottoman villas of Amasya along the banks of the river Yeşilırmak, below the Pontic Royal rock tombs and mountain top ancient citadel, Turkey
  • Upper Temple, Hattusa (also Ḫattuša or Hattusas) late Anatolian Bronze Age capital of the Hittite Empire. Hittite archaeological site and ruins, Boğazkale, Turkey.
  • Upper Temple, Hattusa (also Ḫattuša or Hattusas) late Anatolian Bronze Age capital of the Hittite Empire. Hittite archaeological site and ruins, Boğazkale, Turkey.
  • Upper Temple, Hattusa (also Ḫattuša or Hattusas) late Anatolian Bronze Age capital of the Hittite Empire. Hittite archaeological site and ruins, Boğazkale, Turkey.
  • Hattusa (also Ḫattuša or Hattusas) late Anatolian Bronze Age capital of the Hittite Empire. Hittite archaeological site and ruins, Boğazkale, Turkey.
  • Royal Palace, Hattusa (also Ḫattuša or Hattusas) late Anatolian Bronze Age capital of the Hittite Empire. Hittite archaeological site and ruins, Boğazkale, Turkey.
  • Hieroglyphics on rock face, Hattusa (also Ḫattuša or Hattusas) late Anatolian Bronze Age capital of the Hittite Empire. Hittite archaeological site and ruins, Boğazkale, Turkey.
  • Royal Palace, Hattusa (also Ḫattuša or Hattusas) late Anatolian Bronze Age capital of the Hittite Empire. Hittite archaeological site and ruins, Boğazkale, Turkey.
  • walls of Royal castle palace, Hattusa (also Ḫattuša or Hattusas) late Anatolian Bronze Age capital of the Hittite Empire. Hittite archaeological site and ruins, Boğazkale, Turkey.
  • Hieroglyphics on rock face, Hattusa (also Ḫattuša or Hattusas) late Anatolian Bronze Age capital of the Hittite Empire. Hittite archaeological site and ruins, Boğazkale, Turkey.
  • Hieroglyphics on rock face, Hattusa (also Ḫattuša or Hattusas) late Anatolian Bronze Age capital of the Hittite Empire. Hittite archaeological site and ruins, Boğazkale, Turkey.
  • Entrance of Temple I, Hattusa (also Ḫattuša or Hattusas) late Anatolian Bronze Age capital of the Hittite Empire. Hittite archaeological site and ruins, Boğazkale, Turkey.
  • Dressed stone blocks of Temple I store room walls,Hattusa (also Ḫattuša or Hattusas) late Anatolian Bronze Age capital of the Hittite Empire. Hittite archaeological site and ruins, Boğazkale, Turkey.
  • Dressed stone blocks of Temple I store room walls, Hattusa (also Ḫattuša or Hattusas) late Anatolian Bronze Age capital of the Hittite Empire. Hittite archaeological site and ruins, Boğazkale, Turkey.
  • Dressed stone blocks of Temple I walls with round holes that held pins to tie in the blocks above.  Hattusa (also Ḫattuša or Hattusas) late Anatolian Bronze Age capital of the Hittite Empire. Hittite archaeological site and ruins, Boğazkale, Turkey.
  • Ruins of walls of Temple I, Hattusa (also Ḫattuša or Hattusas) late Anatolian Bronze Age capital of the Hittite Empire. Hittite archaeological site and ruins, Boğazkale, Turkey.
  • Dressed stone blocks of Temple I walls with round holes that held pins to tie in the blocks above.  Hattusa (also Ḫattuša or Hattusas) late Anatolian Bronze Age capital of the Hittite Empire. Hittite archaeological site and ruins, Boğazkale, Turkey.
  • Ruins of walls of Temple I, Hattusa (also Ḫattuša or Hattusas) late Anatolian Bronze Age capital of the Hittite Empire. Hittite archaeological site and ruins, Boğazkale, Turkey.
  • Dressed stone blocks of Temple I walls, Hattusa (also Ḫattuša or Hattusas) late Anatolian Bronze Age capital of the Hittite Empire. Hittite archaeological site and ruins, Boğazkale, Turkey.
  • Dressed stone blocks of Temple I walls, Hattusa (also Ḫattuša or Hattusas) late Anatolian Bronze Age capital of the Hittite Empire. Hittite archaeological site and ruins, Boğazkale, Turkey.
  • Ruins of walls of Temple I, Hattusa (also Ḫattuša or Hattusas) late Anatolian Bronze Age capital of the Hittite Empire. Hittite archaeological site and ruins, Boğazkale, Turkey.
  • Hittite Lion sculptures of Temple I, Hattusa (also Ḫattuša or Hattusas) late Anatolian Bronze Age capital of the Hittite Empire. Hittite archaeological site and ruins, Boğazkale, Turkey.

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FunkyStock Picture Library free resource for professional editorial picture editors, picture researchers, historical scholars and students and enthusiasts who want to browse some of the best pictures and images of historic countries, historical places, archaeological sites and the very best museum antiquities and artefacts exhibits in Europe and the Middle East.

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