• Roman statue of Apollo. known as the Chigi Apollo,  mid 2nd cent. AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. As suggested by the quiver strap slung across the body, the god held a bow and arrow , in a pose of absorbed meditation. Wrapped around the tree trunk which acts as a support are gods attributes: the laurel and the snake. This classical statue is a reworking of an original Greek statue of the 4th cent. BC.  Inv 75675, The National Roman Museum, Rome, ItalyThe National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Apollo. known as the Chigi Apollo,  mid 2nd cent. AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. As suggested by the quiver strap slung across the body, the god held a bow and arrow , in a pose of absorbed meditation. Wrapped around the tree trunk which acts as a support are gods attributes: the laurel and the snake. This classical statue is a reworking of an original Greek statue of the 4th cent. BC.  Inv 75675, The National Roman Museum, Rome, ItalyThe National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Apollo. known as the Chigi Apollo,  mid 2nd cent. AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. As suggested by the quiver strap slung across the body, the god held a bow and arrow , in a pose of absorbed meditation. Wrapped around the tree trunk which acts as a support are gods attributes: the laurel and the snake. This classical statue is a reworking of an original Greek statue of the 4th cent. BC.  Inv 75675, The National Roman Museum, Rome, ItalyThe National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Apollo. known as the Chigi Apollo,  mid 2nd cent. AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. As suggested by the quiver strap slung across the body, the god held a bow and arrow , in a pose of absorbed meditation. Wrapped around the tree trunk which acts as a support are gods attributes: the laurel and the snake. This classical statue is a reworking of an original Greek statue of the 4th cent. BC.  Inv 75675, The National Roman Museum, Rome, ItalyThe National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Apollo. known as the Chigi Apollo,  mid 2nd cent. AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. As suggested by the quiver strap slung across the body, the god held a bow and arrow , in a pose of absorbed meditation. Wrapped around the tree trunk which acts as a support are gods attributes: the laurel and the snake. This classical statue is a reworking of an original Greek statue of the 4th cent. BC.  Inv 75675, The National Roman Museum, Rome, ItalyThe National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman statue of Apollo. known as the Chigi Apollo,  mid 2nd cent. AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. As suggested by the quiver strap slung across the body, the god held a bow and arrow , in a pose of absorbed meditation. Wrapped around the tree trunk which acts as a support are gods attributes: the laurel and the snake. This classical statue is a reworking of an original Greek statue of the 4th cent. BC.  Inv 75675, The National Roman Museum, Rome, ItalyThe National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Apollo and a Muse Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
On the left stood Apollo, one foot raised on a rock, playing his lyre which rests on top of the omphalos (the earth’s navel stone, tied down at Delphi(. On the right stands a muse holding one arm of Apollos lyre.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Apollo and a Muse Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.     Against a white background.<br />
<br />
On the left stood Apollo, one foot raised on a rock, playing his lyre which rests on top of the omphalos (the earth’s navel stone, tied down at Delphi(. On the right stands a muse holding one arm of Apollos lyre.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Apollo and a Muse Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
On the left stood Apollo, one foot raised on a rock, playing his lyre which rests on top of the omphalos (the earth’s navel stone, tied down at Delphi(. On the right stands a muse holding one arm of Apollos lyre.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Apollo and a Muse Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
On the left stood Apollo, one foot raised on a rock, playing his lyre which rests on top of the omphalos (the earth’s navel stone, tied down at Delphi(. On the right stands a muse holding one arm of Apollos lyre.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Apollo and a Muse Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
On the left stood Apollo, one foot raised on a rock, playing his lyre which rests on top of the omphalos (the earth’s navel stone, tied down at Delphi(. On the right stands a muse holding one arm of Apollos lyre.
  • Roman statue of Apollo .Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.
  • Roman statue of Apollo .Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a white background.
  • Roman statue of Apollo .Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a black background.
  • Roman statue of Apollo .Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey. Against a warm art background.
  • Roman statue of Apollo .Marble. Perge. 2nd century AD. Antalya Archaeology Museum; Turkey.  Against a grey background
  • Detail of a second Century Roman statue of Apollo excavated from the Theatre of Carthage. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Inv No C939. Against a black background.
  • Detail of a second Century Roman statue of Apollo excavated from the Theatre of Carthage. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Inv No C939. v
  • Detail of a second Century Roman statue of Apollo excavated from the Theatre of Carthage. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Inv No C939
  • Detail of a second Century Roman statue of Apollo excavated from the Theatre of Carthage. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Inv No C939. Against a white background.
  • Detail of a second Century Roman statue of Apollo excavated from the Theatre of Carthage. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Inv No C939. Against a grey art background.
  • Second Century Roman statue of Apollo excavated from the Theatre of Carthage. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Inv No C939.  Against a white background.
  • Second Century Roman statue of Apollo excavated from the Theatre of Carthage. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Inv No C939.  Against a black background.
  • Second Century Roman statue of Apollo excavated from the Theatre of Carthage. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Inv No C939.   Against a grey background.
  • Second Century Roman statue of Apollo excavated from the Theatre of Carthage. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Inv No C939
  • Second Century Roman statue of Apollo excavated from the Theatre of Carthage. The Bardo National Museum, Tunis, Tunisia. Inv No C939. Against a grey art background.
  • Roman ststue of Apollo with a lyre, copied from an earlier 4th cebtury BC Hellenistic statue, from a group of Muses found in Villa de Cassius at Tivoli,  inv 310, Vatican Museum Rome, Italy,  white background
  • White Ground Kylix from a tomb in Delphi. Athenian 480-470 BC. Apollo depicted crowned in Myrtle Leaves, seated on a stool, with lion claw feet, dressed in a white peoples. In his left hand he has a liar and with his right hand he pours a libation from a naval-phiale. The Crow recalls his mythical love for the beautiful Aigle-Koroni, daughter of King Phlegyas. Delphi Archaeological museum.
  • White Ground Kylix from a tomb in Delphi. Athenian 480-470 BC. Apollo depicted crowned in Myrtle Leaves, seated on a stool, with lion claw feet, dressed in a white peoples. In his left hand he has a liar and with his right hand he pours a libation from a naval-phiale. The Crow recalls his mythical love for the beautiful Aigle-Koroni, daughter of King Phlegyas. Delphi Archaeological museum.
  • White Ground Kylix from a tomb in Delphi. Athenian 480-470 BC. Apollo depicted crowned in Myrtle Leaves, seated on a stool, with lion claw feet, dressed in a white peoples. In his left hand he has a liar and with his right hand he pours a libation from a naval-phiale. The Crow recalls his mythical love for the beautiful Aigle-Koroni, daughter of King Phlegyas. Delphi Archaeological museum.
  • Roman statue of Apollo. known as the Chigi Apollo,  mid 2nd cent. AD from the Imperial Villa, Rome. As suggested by the quiver strap slung across the body, the god held a bow and arrow , in a pose of absorbed meditation. Wrapped around the tree trunk which acts as a support are gods attributes: the laurel and the snake. This classical statue is a reworking of an original Greek statue of the 4th cent. BC.  Inv 75675, The National Roman Museum, Rome, ItalyThe National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • White Ground Kylix from a tomb in Delphi. Athenian 480-470 BC. Apollo depicted crowned in Myrtle Leaves, seated on a stool, with lion claw feet, dressed in a white peoples. In his left hand he has a liar and with his right hand he pours a libation from a naval-phiale. The Crow recalls his mythical love for the beautiful Aigle-Koroni, daughter of King Phlegyas. Delphi Archaeological museum.
  • White Ground Kylix from a tomb in Delphi. Athenian 480-470 BC. Apollo depicted crowned in Myrtle Leaves, seated on a stool, with lion claw feet, dressed in a white peoples. In his left hand he has a liar and with his right hand he pours a libation from a naval-phiale. The Crow recalls his mythical love for the beautiful Aigle-Koroni, daughter of King Phlegyas. Delphi Archaeological museum.
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting in the centre Aion, god of eternity, with Artemis and Apollo to his left and right and the Four Seasons, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.
  • Roman statue of Apollo with a lyre, copied from an earlier 4th cebtury BC Hellenistic statue, from a group of Muses found in Villa de Cassius at Tivoli,  inv 310, Vatican Museum Rome, Italy,  white background
  • Roman ststue of Apollo with a lyre, copied from an earlier 4th cebtury BC Hellenistic statue, from a group of Muses found in Villa de Cassius at Tivoli,  inv 310, Vatican Museum Rome, Italy,  art background
  • Roman ststue of Apollo with a lyre, copied from an earlier 4th cebtury BC Hellenistic statue, from a group of Muses found in Villa de Cassius at Tivoli,  inv 310, Vatican Museum Rome, Italy,  grey art background
  • White Ground Kylix from a tomb in Delphi. Athenian 480-470 BC. Apollo depicted crowned in Myrtle Leaves, seated on a stool, with lion claw feet, dressed in a white peoples. In his left hand he has a liar and with his right hand he pours a libation from a naval-phiale. The Crow recalls his mythical love for the beautiful Aigle-Koroni, daughter of King Phlegyas. Delphi Archaeological museum.
  • Doorway of the ruins of the Temple of Apollo. Naxos, Greek Cyclades Islands.
  • Doorway of the ruins of the Temple of Apollo. Naxos, Greek Cyclades Islands.
  • Roman ststue of Apollo with a lyre, copied from an earlier 4th cebtury BC Hellenistic statue, from a group of Muses found in Villa de Cassius at Tivoli,  inv 310, Vatican Museum Rome, Italy,  grey  background
  • Doorway of the ruins of the Temple of Apollo. Naxos, Greek Cyclades Islands.
  • The Flaying of Marsyas - a 1st or 2nd century AD Roman sculpture from Italy. In the contest between Apollo and Marsyas, the terms stated that the winner could treat the defeated party any way he wanted. Since the contest was judged by the Muses,[6] Marsyas naturally lost and was flayed alive in a cave near Celaenae for his hubris to challenge a god. Apollo then nailed Marsyas' skin to a pine tree,[7] near Lake Aulocrene (Karakuyu Gölü in Turkey).  Inv No. MR267 (Usual No Ma 542), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • The Flaying of Marsyas - a 1st or 2nd century AD Roman sculpture from Italy. In the contest between Apollo and Marsyas, the terms stated that the winner could treat the defeated party any way he wanted. Since the contest was judged by the Muses,[6] Marsyas naturally lost and was flayed alive in a cave near Celaenae for his hubris to challenge a god. Apollo then nailed Marsyas' skin to a pine tree,[7] near Lake Aulocrene (Karakuyu Gölü in Turkey).  Inv No. MR267 (Usual No Ma 542), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • The Flaying of Marsyas - a 1st or 2nd century AD Roman sculpture from Italy. In the contest between Apollo and Marsyas, the terms stated that the winner could treat the defeated party any way he wanted. Since the contest was judged by the Muses,[6] Marsyas naturally lost and was flayed alive in a cave near Celaenae for his hubris to challenge a god. Apollo then nailed Marsyas' skin to a pine tree,[7] near Lake Aulocrene (Karakuyu Gölü in Turkey).  Inv No. MR267 (Usual No Ma 542), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • The Flaying of Marsyas - a 1st or 2nd century AD Roman sculpture from Italy. In the contest between Apollo and Marsyas, the terms stated that the winner could treat the defeated party any way he wanted. Since the contest was judged by the Muses,[6] Marsyas naturally lost and was flayed alive in a cave near Celaenae for his hubris to challenge a god. Apollo then nailed Marsyas' skin to a pine tree,[7] near Lake Aulocrene (Karakuyu Gölü in Turkey).  Inv No. MR267 (Usual No Ma 542), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • The Flaying of Marsyas - a 1st or 2nd century AD Roman sculpture from Italy. In the contest between Apollo and Marsyas, the terms stated that the winner could treat the defeated party any way he wanted. Since the contest was judged by the Muses,[6] Marsyas naturally lost and was flayed alive in a cave near Celaenae for his hubris to challenge a god. Apollo then nailed Marsyas' skin to a pine tree,[7] near Lake Aulocrene (Karakuyu Gölü in Turkey).  Inv No. MR267 (Usual No Ma 542), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • The Flaying of Marsyas - a 1st or 2nd century AD Roman sculpture from Italy. In the contest between Apollo and Marsyas, the terms stated that the winner could treat the defeated party any way he wanted. Since the contest was judged by the Muses,[6] Marsyas naturally lost and was flayed alive in a cave near Celaenae for his hubris to challenge a god. Apollo then nailed Marsyas' skin to a pine tree,[7] near Lake Aulocrene (Karakuyu Gölü in Turkey).  Inv No. MR267 (Usual No Ma 542), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • The Flaying of Marsyas - a 1st or 2nd century AD Roman sculpture from Italy. In the contest between Apollo and Marsyas, the terms stated that the winner could treat the defeated party any way he wanted. Since the contest was judged by the Muses,[6] Marsyas naturally lost and was flayed alive in a cave near Celaenae for his hubris to challenge a god. Apollo then nailed Marsyas' skin to a pine tree,[7] near Lake Aulocrene (Karakuyu Gölü in Turkey).  Inv No. MR267 (Usual No Ma 542), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • The Flaying of Marsyas - a 1st or 2nd century AD Roman sculpture from Italy. In the contest between Apollo and Marsyas, the terms stated that the winner could treat the defeated party any way he wanted. Since the contest was judged by the Muses,[6] Marsyas naturally lost and was flayed alive in a cave near Celaenae for his hubris to challenge a god. Apollo then nailed Marsyas' skin to a pine tree,[7] near Lake Aulocrene (Karakuyu Gölü in Turkey).  Inv No. MR267 (Usual No Ma 542), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Orestes At Delphi Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   <br />
<br />
Orestes who has sought sanctuary at Delphi after murdering his mother, leaves Apollo’s shrine on his way to stand trial in Athens, The hero steps gingerly over sleeping Fury; he brandishes a sword and still hold onto Apollo’s tripod. The Fury has a snake and a burning torch with which she torments male factors. A small local nymph sits above on a rocky outcrop of Delphi’s Mt Parnossos
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting scenes from mythology, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. End of 2nd century AD, House in Jiliani Guirat area. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia. Against a white background<br />
<br />
This Roman mosaic depicts Aurore enticing Cephane, Apollo enticing Cyrene and Apollo persuing Daphne
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Orestes At Delphi Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   <br />
<br />
Orestes who has sought sanctuary at Delphi after murdering his mother, leaves Apollo’s shrine on his way to stand trial in Athens, The hero steps gingerly over sleeping Fury; he brandishes a sword and still hold onto Apollo’s tripod. The Fury has a snake and a burning torch with which she torments male factors. A small local nymph sits above on a rocky outcrop of Delphi’s Mt Parnossos
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Orestes At Delphi Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   <br />
<br />
Orestes who has sought sanctuary at Delphi after murdering his mother, leaves Apollo’s shrine on his way to stand trial in Athens, The hero steps gingerly over sleeping Fury; he brandishes a sword and still hold onto Apollo’s tripod. The Fury has a snake and a burning torch with which she torments male factors. A small local nymph sits above on a rocky outcrop of Delphi’s Mt Parnossos
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Orestes At Delphi Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   <br />
<br />
Orestes who has sought sanctuary at Delphi after murdering his mother, leaves Apollo’s shrine on his way to stand trial in Athens, The hero steps gingerly over sleeping Fury; he brandishes a sword and still hold onto Apollo’s tripod. The Fury has a snake and a burning torch with which she torments male factors. A small local nymph sits above on a rocky outcrop of Delphi’s Mt Parnossos
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Orestes At Delphi Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   <br />
<br />
Orestes who has sought sanctuary at Delphi after murdering his mother, leaves Apollo’s shrine on his way to stand trial in Athens, The hero steps gingerly over sleeping Fury; he brandishes a sword and still hold onto Apollo’s tripod. The Fury has a snake and a burning torch with which she torments male factors. A small local nymph sits above on a rocky outcrop of Delphi’s Mt Parnossos
  • RomanSebasteion relief  sculpture of Orestes At Delphi Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
Orestes who has sought sanctuary at Delphi after murdering his mother, leaves Apollo’s shrine on his way to stand trial in Athens, The hero steps gingerly over sleeping Fury; he brandishes a sword and still hold onto Apollo’s tripod. The Fury has a snake and a burning torch with which she torments male factors. A small local nymph sits above on a rocky outcrop of Delphi’s Mt Parnossos
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Orestes At Delphi Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Orestes who has sought sanctuary at Delphi after murdering his mother, leaves Apollo’s shrine on his way to stand trial in Athens, The hero steps gingerly over sleeping Fury; he brandishes a sword and still hold onto Apollo’s tripod. The Fury has a snake and a burning torch with which she torments male factors. A small local nymph sits above on a rocky outcrop of Delphi’s Mt Parnossos
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Orestes At Delphi Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Orestes who has sought sanctuary at Delphi after murdering his mother, leaves Apollo’s shrine on his way to stand trial in Athens, The hero steps gingerly over sleeping Fury; he brandishes a sword and still hold onto Apollo’s tripod. The Fury has a snake and a burning torch with which she torments male factors. A small local nymph sits above on a rocky outcrop of Delphi’s Mt Parnossos
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Orestes At Delphi Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
Orestes who has sought sanctuary at Delphi after murdering his mother, leaves Apollo’s shrine on his way to stand trial in Athens, The hero steps gingerly over sleeping Fury; he brandishes a sword and still hold onto Apollo’s tripod. The Fury has a snake and a burning torch with which she torments male factors. A small local nymph sits above on a rocky outcrop of Delphi’s Mt Parnossos
  • Roman Sebasteion relief  sculpture of Orestes At Delphi Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
Orestes who has sought sanctuary at Delphi after murdering his mother, leaves Apollo’s shrine on his way to stand trial in Athens, The hero steps gingerly over sleeping Fury; he brandishes a sword and still hold onto Apollo’s tripod. The Fury has a snake and a burning torch with which she torments male factors. A small local nymph sits above on a rocky outcrop of Delphi’s Mt Parnossos
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting scenes from mythology, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. End of 2nd century AD, House in Jiliani Guirat area. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.<br />
<br />
This Roman mosaic depicts Aurore enticing Cephane, Apollo enticing Cyrene and Apollo persuing Daphne
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting scenes from mythology, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. End of 2nd century AD, House in Jiliani Guirat area. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia. Against a black background<br />
<br />
This Roman mosaic depicts Aurore enticing Cephane, Apollo enticing Cyrene and Apollo persuing Daphne
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting scenes from mythology, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. End of 2nd century AD, House in Jiliani Guirat area. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.<br />
<br />
This Roman mosaic depicts Aurore enticing Cephane, Apollo enticing Cyrene and Apollo persuing Daphne
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting scenes from mythology, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. End of 2nd century AD, House in Jiliani Guirat area. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.<br />
<br />
This Roman mosaic depicts Aurore enticing Cephane, Apollo enticing Cyrene and Apollo persuing Daphne
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting scenes from mythology, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. End of 2nd century AD, House in Jiliani Guirat area. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.<br />
<br />
This Roman mosaic depicts Aurore enticing Cephane, Apollo enticing Cyrene and Apollo persuing Daphne
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting scenes from mythology, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. End of 2nd century AD, House in Jiliani Guirat area. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia. Against an art background<br />
<br />
This Roman mosaic depicts Aurore enticing Cephane, Apollo enticing Cyrene and Apollo persuing Daphne
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting scenes from mythology, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. End of 2nd century AD, House in Jiliani Guirat area. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia. Against a grey background<br />
<br />
This Roman mosaic depicts Aurore enticing Cephane, Apollo enticing Cyrene and Apollo persuing Daphne
  • Roman relief sculpture of the Birth of Apollo. Roman 2nd century AD, Hierapolis Theatre.. Hierapolis Archaeology Museum, Turkey. Against an white background
  • Roman relief sculpture of the Birth of Apollo. Roman 2nd century AD, Hierapolis Theatre.. Hierapolis Archaeology Museum, Turkey . Against an black background
  • Roman relief sculpture of the Birth of Apollo. Roman 2nd century AD, Hierapolis Theatre.. Hierapolis Archaeology Museum, Turkey. Against an art background
  • Roman relief sculpture of the Birth of Apollo. Roman 2nd century AD, Hierapolis Theatre.. Hierapolis Archaeology Museum, Turkey. Against a grey background
  • Roman relief sculpture of the Birth of Apollo. Roman 2nd century AD, Hierapolis Theatre.. Hierapolis Archaeology Museum, Turkey
  • Detail of the Roman fresco wall painting of all the characters in the story of Admetus who, aided by Apollo made the Fates agree not to take Admetus on his 'death day' if he could find someone else to replace him, his wife, Alcestis, dies instead of Admetus but as she decends into the Underworld he discovers that he no longer wants to live without her, Pompeii House of the Tragic Poet , inv 9026, Naples National Archaeological Museum, white background
  • Detail of the Roman fresco wall painting of all the characters in the story of Admetus who, aided by Apollo made the Fates agree not to take Admetus on his 'death day' if he could find someone else to replace him, his wife, Alcestis, dies instead of Admetus but as she decends into the Underworld he discovers that he no longer wants to live without her, Pompeii House of the Tragic Poet, inv 9026, Naples National Archaeological Museum, grey background
  • Detail of the Roman fresco wall painting of all the characters in the story of Admetus who, aided by Apollo made the Fates agree not to take Admetus on his 'death day' if he could find someone else to replace him, his wife, Alcestis, dies instead of Admetus but as she decends into the Underworld he discovers that he no longer wants to live without her, Pompeii House of the Tragic Poet, inv 9026, Naples National Archaeological Museum, black background
  • Detail of the Roman fresco wall painting of all the characters in the story of Admetus who, aided by Apollo made the Fates agree not to take Admetus on his 'death day' if he could find someone else to replace him, his wife, Alcestis, dies instead of Admetus but as she decends into the Underworld he discovers that he no longer wants to live without her, Pompeii House of the Tragic Poet, inv 9026, Naples National Archaeological Museum, grey art background
  • Detail of the Roman fresco wall painting of all the characters in the story of Admetus who, aided by Apollo made the Fates agree not to take Admetus on his 'death day' if he could find someone else to replace him, his wife, Alcestis, dies instead of Admetus but as she decends into the Underworld he discovers that he no longer wants to live without her, Pompeii House of the Tragic Poet, inv 9026, Naples National Archaeological Museum, art background
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Tree Graces from the South Building, Second storey, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. Apollo sits on his raised platform with his tripod at his oracular shrine. He is approached by 2 figures one with the flat diadem of a king who have come to consult him. Cut Out
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Tree Graces from the South Building, Second storey, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. Apollo sits on his raised platform with his tripod at his oracular shrine. He is approached by 2 figures one with the flat diadem of a king who have come to consult him. Cut Out
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Tree Graces from the South Building, Second storey, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. Apollo sits on his raised platform with his tripod at his oracular shrine. He is approached by 2 figures one with the flat diadem of a king who have come to consult him. Cut Out
  • The Flaying of Marsyas - a 1st or 2nd century AD Roman sculpture from Italy. In the contest between Apollo and Marsyas, the terms stated that the winner could treat the defeated party any way he wanted. Since the contest was judged by the Muses,[6] Marsyas naturally lost and was flayed alive in a cave near Celaenae for his hubris to challenge a god. Apollo then nailed Marsyas' skin to a pine tree,[7] near Lake Aulocrene (Karakuyu Gölü in Turkey).  Inv No. MR267 (Usual No Ma 542), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Greek  statue of a Niobid from the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), a Greek original from the 5th cent BC found near the Via Collina and Piazza Sallustio, Rome. The wounded female figure whose back has been struck by an arrow is one of fourteen children of Amphion of Thebes and Niobe.  According to myth, Niobe insulted Lato, mother of the divine Apollo and Artemis; “why ever should Lato, a women of common birth, with a coarse daughter and an effeminate son, be preferred to me, the niece of Zeus and Atlas, scourge of the Phyrigians and the royal house of Cadmus?.”. The vengeful Lato ordered Apollo and Artemis to kill Niobe’s children who were struck down with arrows. In antiquity the myth of the Niobids was the subject matter of numerous works of art. The statue , a 5th century Greek original, was used as an ornamental piece in the Horti Sallustiani (Gardens of Sallust), where it was found with other figures of Niobids, two of which are now at the Ny Carlsberg Glypotheck in Copenhargen. Originally it was part of a pedimental group which decorated the facade of a Greek Temple. Inv 72274, The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • The Flaying of Marsyas - a 1st or 2nd century AD Roman sculpture from Italy. In the contest between Apollo and Marsyas, the terms stated that the winner could treat the defeated party any way he wanted. Since the contest was judged by the Muses,[6] Marsyas naturally lost and was flayed alive in a cave near Celaenae for his hubris to challenge a god. Apollo then nailed Marsyas' skin to a pine tree,[7] near Lake Aulocrene (Karakuyu Gölü in Turkey).  Inv No. MR267 (Usual No Ma 542), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Tree Graces from the South Building, Second storey, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. Apollo sits on his raised platform with his tripod at his oracular shrine. He is approached by 2 figures one with the flat diadem of a king who have come to consult him. Cut Out
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Tree Graces from the South Building, Second storey, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. Apollo sits on his raised platform with his tripod at his oracular shrine. He is approached by 2 figures one with the flat diadem of a king who have come to consult him. Cut Out
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Tree Graces from the South Building, Second storey, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. Apollo sits on his raised platform with his tripod at his oracular shrine. He is approached by 2 figures one with the flat diadem of a king who have come to consult him. Cut Out
  • Statue heads, from right, Herekles & Apollo  in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue heads, from right, Herekles, Apollo & Zeus, with headless seated statues in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue heads, from right, Eagle, Herekles, Apollo, Zeus, Commagene, Antiochus, & Eagle, 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue heads at sunset, from left,  Eagle, Antiochus, Commagene, Zeus, Apollo, & Herekles with headless seated statues in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue head of from left, Apollo, Herekles & Eagle in front of the 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, west Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue head, from left, Antiochus, Commenge , Zeus, Apollo, Herekles & Eagle, in front of the 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, west Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue head, from front, of an eagle, Herakles & Apollo, & Zeus (left), in front of the 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, west Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Painted Domestic Pine in the Roman fresco of a garden from Villa Livia (Early first century AD), Rome, Livia was the wife of Roman emperor Augustus.  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
Trees and shrubs had symbolic importance to the Romans as can be see by the plants used in the trompe-l’œil frescoes from the Villa Livia, Rome, which contains plants linked to the deities particularily venerated by Augustus and Livia. <br />
<br />
Domestic pine: present in the mystery rites of Cybele, Attis and Dionysus. Laurel: sacred to Apollo, symbol of triumph, it recalls the famous prodigy associated with Livia Drusilla.
  • Painted Domestic Pine in the Roman fresco of a garden from Villa Livia (Early first century AD), Rome, Livia was the wife of Roman emperor Augustus.  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
Trees and shrubs had symbolic importance to the Romans as can be see by the plants used in the trompe-l’œil frescoes from the Villa Livia, Rome, which contains plants linked to the deities particularily venerated by Augustus and Livia. <br />
<br />
Domestic pine: present in the mystery rites of Cybele, Attis and Dionysus. Laurel: sacred to Apollo, symbol of triumph, it recalls the famous prodigy associated with Livia Drusilla.
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Tree Graces from the South Building, Second storey, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. Apollo sits on his raised platform with his tripod at his oracular shrine. He is approached by 2 figures one with the flat diadem of a king who have come to consult him. Cut Out
  • The Autumn Room- Frescoes on the vaulted ceiling depict the meetingbetween Bacchus and Ariadne, by Antonio de Dominici. Over the doors & mirrors are paintings by Gerolamo Starace painted between 1780-81, showing the mythical subjects of : Ceres, Allorgories of Dianna, Vulca, The Allagories of Saturn, Juno and Apollo. The Kings of Naples Royal Palace of Caserta, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Roman Temple of Apollo  Pompeii archaeological site, Italy
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Tree Graces from the South Building, Second storey, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. Apollo sits on his raised platform with his tripod at his oracular shrine. He is approached by 2 figures one with the flat diadem of a king who have come to consult him. Cut Out
  • The 1st cent B.C Terrace Temple dedicated to Zeus Soteros  and round sanctuary dating back to the 5th cent B.C and dedicated to the god King Basileus Kaunios, the son of Apollo’s son Miletos and the water nymph Kyanee, . Archaeological site of  Kaunos (Caunos), Dalyan Turkey
  • Column from the temple of Apollo, the Greek archaeological site of Ancient Aegina, Kolna, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Doorway of the ruins of the Temple of Apollo. Naxos, Greek Cyclades Islands.
  • Picture of the Nymphaeum Fountain located inside the sacred area in front of the Apollo temple on the main colonnaded road. Dated from the 2nd century AD and repaired in the 5th century during the Byzantine era. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.
  • Picture of the Nymphaeum located inside the sacred area in front of the Apollo temple on the main colonnaded road. Dated from the 2nd century AD and repaired in the 5th century during the Byzantine era. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.
  • Statue head of Apollo in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue head of Apollo in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue head of Apollo in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue head at sunrise of Apollo in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue head of Apollo in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue heads, from right, Herekles & Apollo  in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue heads, from right, Herekles & Apollo  in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue heads, from right, Herekles & Apollo with headless seated statues in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue heads at sunset, from right, Herekles & Apollo with headless seated statues in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue heads at sunset, from right, Herekles, Apollo & Zeus, with headless seated statues in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue heads at sunset, from right,  Lion, Eagle, Herekles & Apollo,  with headless seated statues in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue heads, from right,  Lion, Eagle, Herekles, Apollo, Zeus, Commagene, Antiochus, & Eagle, with headless seated statues in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue heads, from right,  Lion, Eagle, Herekles & Apollo,  with headless seated statues in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue heads at sunset, from right,  Lion, Eagle, Herekles, Apollo, Zeus, Commagene, Antiochus, & Eagle, with headless seated statues in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue heads at sunrise, from right, Eagle, Herekles, Apollo, Zeus, Commagene, Antiochus, & Eagle, 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue heads, from right, Eagle, Herekles & Apollo with headless seated statues in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue heads, from right, Eagle, Herekles & Apollo with headless seated statues in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue heads, from right, Herekles & Apollo with headless seated statues in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue heads, from right,  Eagle, Herekles & Apollo with headless seated statues in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue heads, from left, Zeus, Apollo,  Herekles Eagle, & Lion with headless seated statues in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue heads at sunset, from right,  Lion, Eagle, Herekles, Apollo, Zeus, Commagene, Antiochus, & Eagle, with headless seated statues in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue heads, from right,  Lion, Eagle, Herekles, Apollo, Zeus, Commagene, Antiochus, & Eagle, with headless seated statues in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue heads, from right,  Lion, Eagle, Herekles, Apollo, Zeus, Commagene, Antiochus, & Eagle,  62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue heads, from right, Herekles, Apollo, Zeus, Commagene, Antiochus, & Eagle,  62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue heads, from left,  Eagle, Antiochus, Commagene, Zeus, Apollo, & Herekles with headless seated statues in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue heads at sunset, from left,  Eagle, Antiochus, Commagene, Zeus, Apollo, & Herekles with headless seated statues in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue heads, from left,  Eagle, Antiochus, Commagene, Zeus, Apollo, & Herekles with headless seated statues in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue heads, from left,  Eagle, Antiochus, Commagene, Zeus, Apollo, & Herekles with headless seated statues in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue heads at sunset, from right,  Eagle, Herekles, Apollo, Zeus, Commagene, Antiochus, & Eagle, with headless seated statues in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue heads at sunset, from right,  Lion, Eagle, Herekles, Apollo, Zeus, Commagene, Antiochus, & Eagle, with headless seated statues in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue heads, from right,  Lion, Eagle, Herekles, Apollo, Zeus, Commagene, Antiochus, & Eagle, with headless seated statues in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue heads, from right,  Eagle, Herekles, Apollo, Zeus, Commagene, Antiochus, & Eagle, with headless seated statues in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue heads, from right,  Eagle, Herekles, Apollo, Zeus, Commagene, Antiochus, & Eagle, with headless seated statues in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, east Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue head of from left,  Commagene, Apollo, Herekles & Eagle in front of the 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, west Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue head of from left, Antiochus, Zeus, Commagene, Apollo, Herekles & Eagle in front of the 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, west Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue head of from left, Antiochus, Zeus, Commagene, Apollo, Herekles & Eagle in front of the 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, west Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue head of from left, Zeus, Commagene, Apollo, Herekles & Eagle in front of the 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, west Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue head of from left, Zeus, Commagene, Apollo, Herekles & Eagle in front of the 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, west Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue head at sunset of from left, Zeus, Commagene, Apollo, Herekles & Eagle in front of the 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, west Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue head of from left, Zeus, Commagene, Apollo, Herekles & Eagle in front of the 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, west Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue head of from left, Apollo, Herekles & Eagle in front of the 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, west Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue head at sunset, from left, Antiochus, Commenge , Zeus, Apollo, Herekles & Eagle, in front of the 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, west Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue head at sunset, from left, Antiochus, Commenge , Zeus, Apollo, Herekles & Eagle, in front of the 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, west Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue head, from left, Antiochus, Commenge , Zeus, Apollo, Herekles & Eagle, in front of the 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, west Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue head, from froint, of an eagle, Herakles & Apollo, & Zeus (left), in front of the stone pyramid  62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, west Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue heads at sunset, from froint, of an eagle, Herakles & Apollo, & Zeus (left), in front of the stone pyramid  62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, west Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue head, from froint, of an eagle, Herakles & Apollo, & Zeus (left), in front of the stone pyramid  62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, west Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue head of Herakles & Apollo (behind) in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, west Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Statue head, from froint, of an eagle (or Zeus), Herakles & Apollo (behind) in front of the stone pyramid 62 BC Royal Tomb of King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene, west Terrace, Mount Nemrut or Nemrud Dagi summit, near Adıyaman, Turkey
  • Painted Domestic Pine in the Roman fresco of a garden from Villa Livia (Early first century AD), Rome, Livia was the wife of Roman emperor Augustus.  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
Trees and shrubs had symbolic importance to the Romans as can be see by the plants used in the trompe-l’œil frescoes from the Villa Livia, Rome, which contains plants linked to the deities particularily venerated by Augustus and Livia. <br />
<br />
Domestic pine: present in the mystery rites of Cybele, Attis and Dionysus. Laurel: sacred to Apollo, symbol of triumph, it recalls the famous prodigy associated with Livia Drusilla.
  • Painted Domestic Pine in the Roman fresco of a garden from Villa Livia (Early first century AD), Rome, Livia was the wife of Roman emperor Augustus.  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
Trees and shrubs had symbolic importance to the Romans as can be see by the plants used in the trompe-l’œil frescoes from the Villa Livia, Rome, which contains plants linked to the deities particularily venerated by Augustus and Livia. <br />
<br />
Domestic pine: present in the mystery rites of Cybele, Attis and Dionysus. Laurel: sacred to Apollo, symbol of triumph, it recalls the famous prodigy associated with Livia Drusilla.
  • Painted Domestic Pine in the Roman fresco of a garden from Villa Livia (Early first century AD), Rome, Livia was the wife of Roman emperor Augustus.  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
Trees and shrubs had symbolic importance to the Romans as can be see by the plants used in the trompe-l’œil frescoes from the Villa Livia, Rome, which contains plants linked to the deities particularily venerated by Augustus and Livia. <br />
<br />
Domestic pine: present in the mystery rites of Cybele, Attis and Dionysus. Laurel: sacred to Apollo, symbol of triumph, it recalls the famous prodigy associated with Livia Drusilla.
  • Painted Domestic Pine in the Roman fresco of a garden from Villa Livia (Early first century AD), Rome, Livia was the wife of Roman emperor Augustus.  Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
Trees and shrubs had symbolic importance to the Romans as can be see by the plants used in the trompe-l’œil frescoes from the Villa Livia, Rome, which contains plants linked to the deities particularily venerated by Augustus and Livia. <br />
<br />
Domestic pine: present in the mystery rites of Cybele, Attis and Dionysus. Laurel: sacred to Apollo, symbol of triumph, it recalls the famous prodigy associated with Livia Drusilla.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of Bedroom E of the Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
Bedroom E, a private room with a bed (kline), was divided into antechamber and alcove. The room is probably a later reworking, as the doorway is off-center. The decoration of the walls, in contrast to cubicula B and D, is done in muted colors. Slender columns with a surreal superstructure frame aedicula with sacred landscapes. Three of these show travellers making a sacrifice to a herm of Athena. The images refer in various ways to the world of women. The little pictures along the walls of the antechamber show girls engaged in different activities. On the rear wall of the alcove, which has a picture with an amorous theme, the goddess Artemis is shown dressed as both huntress and moon goddess. Two Muses are on the opposite wall. The stucco decorations of the vaulted ceiling show idyllic landscapes with sacred elements and mythological scenes. In one, Phaethon asks his father Apollo to let him drive the chariot of the Sun. Other scenes show statues of Zeus, a statue probably representing Augustus as the new Mercury, disks of the sun, winged victories and grotesque figures, all done in very low relief with the elegance and delicacy of jewellery. The mosaic pavement of this room, known from a contemporary watercolor, had a pattern of squares and stars.
  • Roman fresco wall decorations of Bedroom E of the Villa Farnesia, Rome. Museo Nazionale Romano ( National Roman Museum), Rome, Italy.<br />
<br />
Bedroom E, a private room with a bed (kline), was divided into antechamber and alcove. The room is probably a later reworking, as the doorway is off-center. The decoration of the walls, in contrast to cubicula B and D, is done in muted colors. Slender columns with a surreal superstructure frame aedicula with sacred landscapes. Three of these show travellers making a sacrifice to a herm of Athena. The images refer in various ways to the world of women. The little pictures along the walls of the antechamber show girls engaged in different activities. On the rear wall of the alcove, which has a picture with an amorous theme, the goddess Artemis is shown dressed as both huntress and moon goddess. Two Muses are on the opposite wall. The stucco decorations of the vaulted ceiling show idyllic landscapes with sacred elements and mythological scenes. In one, Phaethon asks his father Apollo to let him drive the chariot of the Sun. Other scenes show statues of Zeus, a statue probably representing Augustus as the new Mercury, disks of the sun, winged victories and grotesque figures, all done in very low relief with the elegance and delicacy of jewellery. The mosaic pavement of this room, known from a contemporary watercolor, had a pattern of squares and stars.
  • Roman mosaic depicting in its centre panel the victory of Apollo who is being crowned Marsyas in the mytrhical legend of The Four Seasons. Late 2nd centruy AD from Thysdrus (El Jem). Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Inv 529 Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Roman mosaic depicting in its centre panel the victory of Apollo who is being crowned Marsyas in the mytrhical legend of The Four Seasons. Late 2nd centruy AD from Thysdrus (El Jem). Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Inv 529 Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Roman mosaic depicting in its centre panel the victory of Apollo who is being crowned Marsyas in the mytrhical legend of The Four Seasons. Late 2nd centruy AD from Thysdrus (El Jem). Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Inv 529 Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Roman mosaic depicting in its centre panel the victory of Apollo who is being crowned Marsyas in the mytrhical legend of The Four Seasons. Late 2nd centruy AD from Thysdrus (El Jem). Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Inv 529 Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Roman mosaic depicting in its centre panel the victory of Apollo who is being crowned Marsyas in the mytrhical legend of The Four Seasons. Late 2nd centruy AD from Thysdrus (El Jem). Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Inv 529 Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Roman mosaic depicting in its centre panel the victory of Apollo who is being crowned Marsyas in the mytrhical legend of The Four Seasons. Late 2nd centruy AD from Thysdrus (El Jem). Roman mosaics from the north African Roman province of Africanus . Inv 529 Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia.
  • Third Room of The Library. Queen Mary Caroline commissioned  German painter Freidrich Heinrich Fuger to decorate the Third Library Room. The paintings on the wall represent classical themes of: The Parnassus with Apollo and the Three Graces, The Envy and the Richness, The School of Athens, The protection of The Arts. The two globes represent the planisphere and the astral map and were donated to Ferdinand IV of Bourbon by King of France Louis XVI, his brother-in-law. The Kings of Naples Royal Palace of Caserta, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Third Room of The Library. Queen Mary Caroline commissioned  German painter Freidrich Heinrich Fuger to decorate the Third Library Room. The paintings on the wall represent classical themes of: The Parnassus with Apollo and the Three Graces, The Envy and the Richness, The School of Athens, The protection of The Arts. The two globes represent the planisphere and the astral map and were donated to Ferdinand IV of Bourbon by King of France Louis XVI, his brother-in-law. The Kings of Naples Royal Palace of Caserta, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Third Room of The Library. Queen Mary Caroline commissioned  German painter Freidrich Heinrich Fuger to decorate the Third Library Room. The paintings on the wall represent classical themes of: The Parnassus with Apollo and the Three Graces, The Envy and the Richness, The School of Athens, The protection of The Arts. The two globes represent the planisphere and the astral map and were donated to Ferdinand IV of Bourbon by King of France Louis XVI, his brother-in-law. The Kings of Naples Royal Palace of Caserta, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • The workroom of the Queen Mary Caroline. Also called "the room of Mirrors" the frescoed ceiling is by Antonio de Dominici with pairs of mythical figures : Jupiter and Juno, Apollo and Minerva, Mars and the War and Mercury and Prosperpine. The Kings of Naples Royal Palace of Caserta, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • The Autumn Room- Frescoes on the vaulted ceiling depict the meetingbetween Bacchus and Ariadne, by Antonio de Dominici. Over the doors & mirrors are paintings by Gerolamo Starace painted between 1780-81, showing the mythical subjects of : Ceres, Allorgories of Dianna, Vulca, The Allagories of Saturn, Juno and Apollo. The Kings of Naples Royal Palace of Caserta, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • The Autumn Room- Frescoes on the vaulted ceiling depict the meetingbetween Bacchus and Ariadne, by Antonio de Dominici. Over the doors & mirrors are paintings by Gerolamo Starace painted between 1780-81, showing the mythical subjects of : Ceres, Allorgories of Dianna, Vulca, The Allagories of Saturn, Juno and Apollo. The Kings of Naples Royal Palace of Caserta, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Third Room of The Library. Queen Mary Caroline commissioned  German painter Freidrich Heinrich Fuger to decorate the Third Library Room. The paintings on the wall represent classical themes of: The Parnassus with Apollo and the Three Graces, The Envy and the Richness, The School of Athens, The protection of The Arts. The two globes represent the planisphere and the astral map and were donated to Ferdinand IV of Bourbon by King of France Louis XVI, his brother-in-law. The Kings of Naples Royal Palace of Caserta, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site
  • Roman Temple of Apollo  Pompeii archaeological site, Italy
  • The 1st cent B.C Terrace Temple dedicated to Zeus Soteros  and round sanctuary dating back to the 5th cent B.C and dedicated to the god King Basileus Kaunios, the son of Apollo’s son Miletos and the water nymph Kyanee, . In the background is the silted up harbour.  Archaeological site of  Kaunos (Caunos), Dalyan Turkey
  • The 1st cent B.C Terrace Temple dedicated to Zeus Soteros  and round sanctuary dating back to the 5th cent B.C and dedicated to the god King Basileus Kaunios, the son of Apollo’s son Miletos and the water nymph Kyanee, . In the background is the silted up harbour.  Archaeological site of  Kaunos (Caunos), Dalyan Turkey
  • The 1st cent B.C Terrace Temple dedicated to Zeus Soteros  and round sanctuary dating back to the 5th cent B.C and dedicated to the god King Basileus Kaunios, the son of Apollo’s son Miletos and the water nymph Kyanee, . In the background is the silted up harbour.  Archaeological site of  Kaunos (Caunos), Dalyan Turkey
  • The 1st cent B.C Terrace Temple dedicated to Zeus Soteros  and round sanctuary dating back to the 5th cent B.C and dedicated to the god King Basileus Kaunios, the son of Apollo’s son Miletos and the water nymph Kyanee, . In the background is the silted up harbour.  Archaeological site of  Kaunos (Caunos), Dalyan Turkey
  • The 1st cent B.C Terrace Temple dedicated to Zeus Soteros  and round sanctuary dating back to the 5th cent B.C and dedicated to the god King Basileus Kaunios, the son of Apollo’s son Miletos and the water nymph Kyanee, . In the background is the silted up harbour.  Archaeological site of  Kaunos (Caunos), Dalyan Turkey
  • The 1st cent B.C Terrace Temple dedicated to Zeus Soteros  and round sanctuary dating back to the 5th cent B.C and dedicated to the god King Basileus Kaunios, the son of Apollo’s son Miletos and the water nymph Kyanee, . In the background is the silted up harbour.  Archaeological site of  Kaunos (Caunos), Dalyan Turkey
  • The 1st cent B.C Terrace Temple dedicated to Zeus Soteros  and round sanctuary dating back to the 5th cent B.C and dedicated to the god King Basileus Kaunios, the son of Apollo’s son Miletos and the water nymph Kyanee, . In the background is the silted up harbour.  Archaeological site of  Kaunos (Caunos), Dalyan Turkey
  • The 1st cent B.C Terrace Temple dedicated to Zeus Soteros  and round sanctuary dating back to the 5th cent B.C and dedicated to the god King Basileus Kaunios, the son of Apollo’s son Miletos and the water nymph Kyanee, . Archaeological site of  Kaunos (Caunos), Dalyan Turkey
  • Classical Sphinx attributed to Greek Sculptor Kalamis from the temple of apollo, The Greek archaeological site of Ancient Aegina, Kolna, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Column from the temple of Apollo, the Greek archaeological site of Ancient Aegina, Kolna, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Column from the temple of Apollo, the Greek archaeological site of Ancient Aegina, Kolna, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Column from the temple of Apollo, the Greek archaeological site of Ancient Aegina, Kolna, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Column from the temple of Apollo, the Greek archaeological site of Ancient Aegina, Kolna, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Column from the temple of Apollo, the Greek archaeological site of Ancient Aegina, Kolna, Greek Saronic Islands
  • Doorway of the ruins of the Temple of Apollo. Naxos, Greek Cyclades Islands.
  • Doorway of the ruins of the Temple of Apollo. Naxos, Greek Cyclades Islands.
  • Doorway of the ruins of the Temple of Apollo. Naxos, Greek Cyclades Islands.
  • Doorway of the ruins of the Temple of Apollo. Naxos, Greek Cyclades Islands.
  • Doorway of the ruins of the Temple of Apollo. Naxos, Greek Cyclades Islands.
  • Doorway of the ruins of the Temple of Apollo. Naxos, Greek Cyclades Islands.
  • Doorway of the ruins of the Temple of Apollo. Naxos, Greek Cyclades Islands.
  • Doorway of the ruins of the Temple of Apollo. Naxos, Greek Cyclades Islands.
  • Doorway of the ruins of the Temple of Apollo. Naxos, Greek Cyclades Islands.
  • Doorway of the ruins of the Temple of Apollo. Naxos, Greek Cyclades Islands.
  • Doorway of the ruins of the Temple of Apollo. Naxos, Greek Cyclades Islands.
  • The Organ fountain1566. Sirens either side of a  bas relief of a music contest between Apollo and Marcia, 1566. The organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • The Organ fountain1566. Sirens either side of a  bas relief of a music contest between Apollo and Marcia, 1566. The organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • The Organ fountain1566. Sirens either side of a  bas relief of a music contest between Apollo and Marcia, 1566. The organ pipies driven by air from the fountains. Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy - Unesco World Heritage Site.
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting the Four Seasons, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting Aion and the Four Seasons, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting the Four Seasons, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting the Four Seasons, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting the Four Seasons, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting the Four Seasons, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting the Four Seasons, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting the Four Seasons; from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum; El Djem; Tunisia. Against a white background
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting the Four Seasons, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting the Four Seasons; from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum; El Djem; Tunisia. Against a black background
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting the Four Seasons, from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum, El Djem, Tunisia.
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting the Four Seasons; from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum; El Djem; Tunisia.
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting the Four Seasons; from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum; El Djem; Tunisia. Against an art background
  • Picture of a Roman mosaics design depicting the Four Seasons; from the ancient Roman city of Thysdrus. 3rd century AD. El Djem Archaeological Museum; El Djem; Tunisia. Against a grey background
  • Greek marble Statue of Hermaphroditius ( Hermaphrodites) a mythical being that has both male & female characteristics. From Pergamum (Bergama) Turkey. Istanbul Archaeology Museum, Inv 363T Cat. Mendel 624.

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