• Bridge spouted jug bird decorated. Early Cycladic I (1650-1550 BC); Phylakopi; Melos. National Archaeological Museum Athens. Cat No 5768.  White background.<br />
<br />
<br />
During this Cycladic period the pottery designs were heavily influenced by Cretean minoan with pottery like this using bird patterns.
  • Bridge spouted jug bird decorated. Early Cycladic I (1650-1550 BC); Phylakopi; Melos. National Archaeological Museum Athens. Cat No 5768.  Gray background.<br />
<br />
<br />
During this Cycladic period the pottery designs were heavily influenced by Cretean minoan with pottery like this using bird patterns.
  • Beak spouted jug decorated with flowering crocus. Early Cycladic I (1650-1550 BC) , Phylakopi, Melos. National Archaeological Museum Athens. Cat No 5769.  White background.<br />
<br />
<br />
During this Cycladic period the pottery designs were heavily influenced by Cretean minoan with pottery like this using floral patterns.
  • Beak spouted jug decorated with flowering crocus. Early Cycladic I (1650-1550 BC) , Phylakopi, Melos. National Archaeological Museum Athens. Cat No 5769. Black background.<br />
<br />
During this Cycladic period the pottery designs were heavily influenced by Cretean minoan with pottery like this using floral patterns.
  • Beak spouted jug decorated with flowering crocus. Early Cycladic I (1650-1550 BC) , Phylakopi, Melos. National Archaeological Museum Athens. Cat No 5769.  Grey background.<br />
<br />
<br />
During this Cycladic period the pottery designs were heavily influenced by Cretean minoan with pottery like this using floral patterns.
  • Beak spouted jug decorated with flowering crocus. Early Cycladic I (1650-1550 BC) , Phylakopi, Melos. National Archaeological Museum Athens. Cat No 5769.<br />
<br />
During this Cycladic period the pottery designs were heavily influenced by Cretean minoan with pottery like this using floral patterns.
  • Cycladic terracotta 'frying pan' with incied decoration from  Syros. Early found  at Phylakopi, Melos. Cycladic period III 2300-2000 BC), National Archaeological Museum Athens, Cat No 6172.  White background.<br />
<br />
<br />
These so called 'frying pans' wre created by the Keros-Syros culture and are their useage is uncertain. The compex geometric patterns on their bases suggest that they may have had some symbolic meaning and were used in religious of magical rituals. They could also have served practical purposes being used as dishes, mirror mounts, astrolabes or metris measured for salt traders.
  • Cycladic terracotta 'frying pan' with incied decoration from  Syros. Early found  at Phylakopi, Melos. Cycladic period III 2300-2000 BC), National Archaeological Museum Athens, Cat No 6172. Black background.<br />
<br />
<br />
These so called 'frying pans' wre created by the Keros-Syros culture and are their useage is uncertain. The compex geometric patterns on their bases suggest that they may have had some symbolic meaning and were used in religious of magical rituals. They could also have served practical purposes being used as dishes, mirror mounts, astrolabes or metris measured for salt traders.
  • Cycladic terracotta 'frying pan' with incied decoration from  Syros. Early found  at Phylakopi, Melos. Cycladic period III 2300-2000 BC), National Archaeological Museum Athens, Cat No 6172.  Gray background.<br />
<br />
<br />
These so called 'frying pans' wre created by the Keros-Syros culture and are their useage is uncertain. The compex geometric patterns on their bases suggest that they may have had some symbolic meaning and were used in religious of magical rituals. They could also have served practical purposes being used as dishes, mirror mounts, astrolabes or metris measured for salt traders.
  • Cycladic terracotta 'frying pan' with incied star decoration from Chalandriani, Syros. Early Cycladic period II 2800-2300 BC), National Archaeological Museum Athens, Cat No 5153.  White background.<br />
<br />
<br />
These so called 'frying pans' wre created by the Keros-Syros culture and are their useage is uncertain. The compex geometric patterns on their bases suggest that they may have had some symbolic meaning and were used in religious of magical rituals. They could also have served practical purposes being used as dishes, mirror mounts, astrolabes or metris measured for salt traders.
  • Cycladic terracotta 'frying pan' with incied star decoration from Chalandriani, Syros. Early Cycladic period II 2800-2300 BC), National Archaeological Museum Athens, Cat No 5153. Black background.<br />
<br />
These so called 'frying pans' wre created by the Keros-Syros culture and are their useage is uncertain. The compex geometric patterns on their bases suggest that they may have had some symbolic meaning and were used in religious of magical rituals. They could also have served practical purposes being used as dishes, mirror mounts, astrolabes or metris measured for salt traders.
  • Cycladic terracotta 'frying pan' with incied star decoration from Chalandriani, Syros. Early Cycladic period II 2800-2300 BC), National Archaeological Museum Athens, Cat No 5153.  Gray background.<br />
<br />
<br />
These so called 'frying pans' wre created by the Keros-Syros culture and are their useage is uncertain. The compex geometric patterns on their bases suggest that they may have had some symbolic meaning and were used in religious of magical rituals. They could also have served practical purposes being used as dishes, mirror mounts, astrolabes or metris measured for salt traders.
  • Cycladic terracotta 'frying pan' with incied star decoration from Chalandriani, Syros. Early Cycladic period II 2800-2300 BC), National Archaeological Museum Athens, Cat No 5164.  White background.<br />
<br />
<br />
In the middle of the decoration is a disc surrounded by a triangle motif. Above the handle is incised a pubic triangle.<br />
<br />
These so called 'frying pans' wre created by the Keros-Syros culture and are their useage is uncertain. The compex geometric patterns on their bases suggest that they may have had some symbolic meaning and were used in religious of magical rituals. They could also have served practical purposes being used as dishes, mirror mounts, astrolabes or metris measured for salt traders.
  • Cycladic terracotta 'frying pan' with incied star decoration from Chalandriani, Syros. Early Cycladic period II 2800-2300 BC), National Archaeological Museum Athens, Cat No 5164.  Grey background.<br />
<br />
<br />
In the middle of the decoration is a disc surrounded by a triangle motif. Above the handle is incised a pubic triangle.<br />
<br />
These so called 'frying pans' wre created by the Keros-Syros culture and are their useage is uncertain. The compex geometric patterns on their bases suggest that they may have had some symbolic meaning and were used in religious of magical rituals. They could also have served practical purposes being used as dishes, mirror mounts, astrolabes or metris measured for salt traders.
  • Cycladic terracotta 'frying pan' with incied star decoration from Chalandriani, Syros. Early Cycladic period II 2800-2300 BC), National Archaeological Museum Athens, Cat No 5164. Black background.<br />
<br />
<br />
In the middle of the decoration is a disc surrounded by a triangle motif. Above the handle is incised a pubic triangle.<br />
<br />
These so called 'frying pans' wre created by the Keros-Syros culture and are their useage is uncertain. The compex geometric patterns on their bases suggest that they may have had some symbolic meaning and were used in religious of magical rituals. They could also have served practical purposes being used as dishes, mirror mounts, astrolabes or metris measured for salt traders.
  • Cycladic terracotta 'frying pan' with incied linear decoration from Chalandriani, Syros. Early Cycladic period II 2800-2300 BC), National Archaeological Museum Athens, Cat No 5012.  White background.<br />
<br />
<br />
These so called 'frying pans' wre created by the Keros-Syros culture and are their useage is uncertain. The compex geometric patterns on their bases suggest that they may have had some symbolic meaning and were used in religious of magical rituals. They could also have served practical purposes being used as dishes, mirror mounts, astrolabes or metris measured for salt traders.
  • Cycladic terracotta 'frying pan' with incied linear decoration from Chalandriani, Syros. Early Cycladic period II 2800-2300 BC), National Archaeological Museum Athens, Cat No 5012.  Grey background.<br />
<br />
<br />
These so called 'frying pans' wre created by the Keros-Syros culture and are their useage is uncertain. The compex geometric patterns on their bases suggest that they may have had some symbolic meaning and were used in religious of magical rituals. They could also have served practical purposes being used as dishes, mirror mounts, astrolabes or metris measured for salt traders.
  • Cycladic terracotta 'frying pan' with incied linear decoration from Chalandriani, Syros. Early Cycladic period II 2800-2300 BC), National Archaeological Museum Athens, Cat No 5012.<br />
<br />
These so called 'frying pans' wre created by the Keros-Syros culture and are their useage is uncertain. The compex geometric patterns on their bases suggest that they may have had some symbolic meaning and were used in religious of magical rituals. They could also have served practical purposes being used as dishes, mirror mounts, astrolabes or metris measured for salt traders.
  • Cycladic terracotta 'frying pan' with incied linear decoration from Chalandriani, Syros. Early Cycladic period II 2800-2300 BC), National Archaeological Museum Athens, Cat No 5012.  Gray background.<br />
<br />
<br />
These so called 'frying pans' wre created by the Keros-Syros culture and are their useage is uncertain. The compex geometric patterns on their bases suggest that they may have had some symbolic meaning and were used in religious of magical rituals. They could also have served practical purposes being used as dishes, mirror mounts, astrolabes or metris measured for salt traders.
  • Cycladic terracotta 'frying pan' with incied spiral decoration from Chalandriani, Syros. Early Cycladic period II 2800-2300 BC), National Archaeological Museum Athens, Cat No 5058. Black background.<br />
<br />
<br />
These so called 'frying pans' wre created by the Keros-Syros culture and are their useage is uncertain. The compex geometric patterns on their bases suggest that they may have had some symbolic meaning and were used in religious of magical rituals. They could also have served practical purposes being used as dishes, mirror mounts, astrolabes or metris measured for salt traders.
  • Cycladic terracotta 'frying pan' with incied spiral decoration from Chalandriani, Syros. Early Cycladic period II 2800-2300 BC), National Archaeological Museum Athens, Cat No 5058.  Grey background.<br />
<br />
<br />
These so called 'frying pans' wre created by the Keros-Syros culture and are their useage is uncertain. The compex geometric patterns on their bases suggest that they may have had some symbolic meaning and were used in religious of magical rituals. They could also have served practical purposes being used as dishes, mirror mounts, astrolabes or metris measured for salt traders.
  • Cycladic terracotta 'frying pan' with incied spiral decoration from Chalandriani, Syros. Early Cycladic period II 2800-2300 BC), National Archaeological Museum Athens, Cat No 5058.  White background.<br />
<br />
<br />
These so called 'frying pans' wre created by the Keros-Syros culture and are their useage is uncertain. The compex geometric patterns on their bases suggest that they may have had some symbolic meaning and were used in religious of magical rituals. They could also have served practical purposes being used as dishes, mirror mounts, astrolabes or metris measured for salt traders.
  • Cycladic terracotta 'frying pan' with incied spiral decoration from Chalandriani, Syros. Early Cycladic period II 2800-2300 BC), National Archaeological Museum Athens, Cat No 5058.  Gray background.<br />
<br />
<br />
These so called 'frying pans' wre created by the Keros-Syros culture and are their useage is uncertain. The compex geometric patterns on their bases suggest that they may have had some symbolic meaning and were used in religious of magical rituals. They could also have served practical purposes being used as dishes, mirror mounts, astrolabes or metris measured for salt traders.
  • Cycladic terracotta 'frying pan' with incied spiral decoration from Chalandriani, Syros. Early Cycladic period II 2800-2300 BC), National Archaeological Museum Athens, Black background.<br />
<br />
<br />
These so called 'frying pans' wre created by the Keros-Syros culture and are their useage is uncertain. The compex geometric patterns on their bases suggest that they may have had some symbolic meaning and were used in religious of magical rituals. They could also have served practical purposes being used as dishes, mirror mounts, astrolabes or metris measured for salt traders.
  • Cycladic terracotta 'frying pan' with incied spiral decoration from Chalandriani, Syros. Early Cycladic period II 2800-2300 BC), National Archaeological Museum Athens,  White background.<br />
<br />
<br />
These so called 'frying pans' wre created by the Keros-Syros culture and are their useage is uncertain. The compex geometric patterns on their bases suggest that they may have had some symbolic meaning and were used in religious of magical rituals. They could also have served practical purposes being used as dishes, mirror mounts, astrolabes or metris measured for salt traders.
  • Cycladic terracotta 'frying pan' with incied spiral decoration from Chalandriani, Syros. Early Cycladic period II 2800-2300 BC), National Archaeological Museum Athens,  Grey background.<br />
<br />
<br />
These so called 'frying pans' wre created by the Keros-Syros culture and are their useage is uncertain. The compex geometric patterns on their bases suggest that they may have had some symbolic meaning and were used in religious of magical rituals. They could also have served practical purposes being used as dishes, mirror mounts, astrolabes or metris measured for salt traders.
  • Cycladic terracotta 'frying pan' with incied spiral decoration from Chalandriani, Syros. Early Cycladic period II 2800-2300 BC), National Archaeological Museum Athens,<br />
<br />
These so called 'frying pans' wre created by the Keros-Syros culture and are their useage is uncertain. The compex geometric patterns on their bases suggest that they may have had some symbolic meaning and were used in religious of magical rituals. They could also have served practical purposes being used as dishes, mirror mounts, astrolabes or metris measured for salt traders.
  • Cycladic terracotta 'frying pan' with incied spiral decoration from Chalandriani, Syros. Early Cycladic period II 2800-2300 BC), National Archaeological Museum Athens, Cat No 6177.  White background.<br />
<br />
<br />
These so called 'frying pans' wre created by the Keros-Syros culture and are their useage is uncertain. The compex geometric patterns on their bases suggest that they may have had some symbolic meaning and were used in religious of magical rituals. They could also have served practical purposes being used as dishes, mirror mounts, astrolabes or metris measured for salt traders.
  • Cycladic terracotta 'frying pan' with incied spiral decoration from Chalandriani, Syros. Early Cycladic period II 2800-2300 BC), National Archaeological Museum Athens, Cat No 6177. Black background.<br />
<br />
These so called 'frying pans' wre created by the Keros-Syros culture and are their useage is uncertain. The compex geometric patterns on their bases suggest that they may have had some symbolic meaning and were used in religious of magical rituals. They could also have served practical purposes being used as dishes, mirror mounts, astrolabes or metris measured for salt traders.
  • Cycladic terracotta 'frying pan' with incied spiral decoration from Chalandriani, Syros. Early Cycladic period II 2800-2300 BC), National Archaeological Museum Athens, Cat No 6177.  Grey background.<br />
<br />
<br />
These so called 'frying pans' wre created by the Keros-Syros culture and are their useage is uncertain. The compex geometric patterns on their bases suggest that they may have had some symbolic meaning and were used in religious of magical rituals. They could also have served practical purposes being used as dishes, mirror mounts, astrolabes or metris measured for salt traders.
  • Cycladic terracotta 'frying pan' with incied spiral decoration from Chalandriani, Syros. Early Cycladic period II 2800-2300 BC), National Archaeological Museum Athens, Cat No 6177.  Gray background.<br />
<br />
<br />
These so called 'frying pans' wre created by the Keros-Syros culture and are their useage is uncertain. The compex geometric patterns on their bases suggest that they may have had some symbolic meaning and were used in religious of magical rituals. They could also have served practical purposes being used as dishes, mirror mounts, astrolabes or metris measured for salt traders.
  • Cycladic terracotta 'frying pan' with incied boat and spiral decoration from Chalandriani, Syros. Early Cycladic period II 2800-2300 BC), National Archaeological Museum Athens, Cat No 4974.   Grey background.<br />
<br />
<br />
Yje incised decorations depict a boat amongst spiral formed waves. The boats is of a Ctcladic design  found throughout the Aegean.<br />
<br />
These so called 'frying pans' wre created by the Keros-Syros culture and are their useage is uncertain. The compex geometric patterns on their bases suggest that they may have had some symbolic meaning and were used in religious of magical rituals. They could also have served practical purposes being used as dishes, mirror mounts, astrolabes or metris measured for salt traders.
  • Pictures & images of Aynali Kilise (Church) cave church interior frescoes, iconoclastic period (725-842), near Goreme, Cappadocia, Nevsehir, Turkey<br />
<br />
During the iconoclastic period (725-842) it was forbidden to depict any religious figures in the Orthodox Church so interiors were decorated with simple red and white geometric patterns and crosses.
  • Pictures & images of Aynali Kilise (Church) cave church interior frescoes, iconoclastic period (725-842), near Goreme, Cappadocia, Nevsehir, Turkey<br />
<br />
During the iconoclastic period (725-842) it was forbidden to depict any religious figures in the Orthodox Church so interiors were decorated with simple red and white geometric patterns and crosses.
  • Pictures & images of Aynali Kilise (Church) cave church interior frescoes, iconoclastic period (725-842), near Goreme, Cappadocia, Nevsehir, Turkey<br />
<br />
During the iconoclastic period (725-842) it was forbidden to depict any religious figures in the Orthodox Church so interiors were decorated with simple red and white geometric patterns and crosses.
  • Pictures & images of Aynali Kilise (Church) cave church interior frescoes, iconoclastic period (725-842), near Goreme, Cappadocia, Nevsehir, Turkey<br />
<br />
During the iconoclastic period (725-842) it was forbidden to depict any religious figures in the Orthodox Church so interiors were decorated with simple red and white geometric patterns and crosses.
  • Pictures & images of Aynali Kilise (Church) cave church interior frescoes, iconoclastic period (725-842), near Goreme, Cappadocia, Nevsehir, Turkey<br />
<br />
During the iconoclastic period (725-842) it was forbidden to depict any religious figures in the Orthodox Church so interiors were decorated with simple red and white geometric patterns and crosses.
  • Pictures & images of Aynali Kilise (Church) cave church interior frescoes, iconoclastic period (725-842), near Goreme, Cappadocia, Nevsehir, Turkey<br />
<br />
During the iconoclastic period (725-842) it was forbidden to depict any religious figures in the Orthodox Church so interiors were decorated with simple red and white geometric patterns and crosses.
  • Pictures & images of Aynali Kilise (Church) cave church interior frescoes, iconoclastic period (725-842), near Goreme, Cappadocia, Nevsehir, Turkey<br />
<br />
During the iconoclastic period (725-842) it was forbidden to depict any religious figures in the Orthodox Church so interiors were decorated with simple red and white geometric patterns and crosses.
  • Pictures & images of Aynali Kilise (Church) cave church interior frescoes, iconoclastic period (725-842), near Goreme, Cappadocia, Nevsehir, Turkey<br />
<br />
During the iconoclastic period (725-842) it was forbidden to depict any religious figures in the Orthodox Church so interiors were decorated with simple red and white geometric patterns and crosses.
  • Pictures & images of Aynali Kilise (Church) cave church interior frescoes, iconoclastic period (725-842), near Goreme, Cappadocia, Nevsehir, Turkey<br />
<br />
During the iconoclastic period (725-842) it was forbidden to depict any religious figures in the Orthodox Church so interiors were decorated with simple red and white geometric patterns and crosses.
  • Pictures & images of Aynali Kilise (Church) cave church interior frescoes, iconoclastic period (725-842), near Goreme, Cappadocia, Nevsehir, Turkey<br />
<br />
During the iconoclastic period (725-842) it was forbidden to depict any religious figures in the Orthodox Church so interiors were decorated with simple red and white geometric patterns and crosses.
  • Pictures & images of Aynali Kilise (Church) cave church interior frescoes, iconoclastic period (725-842), near Goreme, Cappadocia, Nevsehir, Turkey<br />
<br />
During the iconoclastic period (725-842) it was forbidden to depict any religious figures in the Orthodox Church so interiors were decorated with simple red and white geometric patterns and crosses.
  • Pictures & images of Aynali Kilise (Church) cave church interior frescoes, iconoclastic period (725-842), near Goreme, Cappadocia, Nevsehir, Turkey<br />
<br />
During the iconoclastic period (725-842) it was forbidden to depict any religious figures in the Orthodox Church so interiors were decorated with simple red and white geometric patterns and crosses.
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Döğer, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Döğer, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Döğer, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Doger, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Doger, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Döğer, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • close up of the facade and relief sculptures of the Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Döğer, Turkey.<br />
<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • close up of the facade and relief sculptures of the Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Doger, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Close up of two sphinxes relief scul[ptures of the Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Doger, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Close up of two sphinxes relief scul[ptures of the Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Doger, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Close up of 2 standing lions of the Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Döğer, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Döğer, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Close up of 2 standing lions of the Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Döğer, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Doger, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Döğer, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Close up picture of the Roman mosaics of the Room with Star Shaped Decorations depicting an octagonal rosette geometric mosaic patterns, room no 22 at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Close up picture of the Roman mosaics of the Room with Star Shaped Decorations depicting an octagonal rosette geometric mosaic patterns, room no 22 at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Close up picture of the Roman mosaics of the Interlying Utility Room depicting geometric mosaic patterns, room no 18 at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Close up picture of the Roman mosaics of the Interlying Utility Room depicting geometric mosaic patterns, room no 18 at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting two Peacocks - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
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<br />
The patterns of peacock tails contain round decorations. These were seen to be the symbolic eyes of omnipotence and often ascribed to the Archangel Michael. The peacock’s feather is sometimes associated with St. Barbara Also, The peacock, (due to an ancient myth that Peacock flesh did not decay), is seen as a symbol of immortality.<br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting two Peacocks - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
<br />
The patterns of peacock tails contain round decorations. These were seen to be the symbolic eyes of omnipotence and often ascribed to the Archangel Michael. The peacock’s feather is sometimes associated with St. Barbara Also, The peacock, (due to an ancient myth that Peacock flesh did not decay), is seen as a symbol of immortality.<br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting two Peacocks - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
<br />
The patterns of peacock tails contain round decorations. These were seen to be the symbolic eyes of omnipotence and often ascribed to the Archangel Michael. The peacock’s feather is sometimes associated with St. Barbara Also, The peacock, (due to an ancient myth that Peacock flesh did not decay), is seen as a symbol of immortality.<br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • Zellij mosaics and arabesque Moorish plasterwork of the Bab Mansour gate. Named after the architect, El-Mansour, completed in 1732 the design of the gate plays with Almohad patterns. Meknes Morocco
  • Zellij mosaics and arabesque Moorish plasterwork of the Bab Mansour gate. Named after the architect, El-Mansour, completed in 1732 the design of the gate plays with Almohad patterns. Meknes Morocco
  • Zellij mosaics and arabesque Moorish plasterwork of the Bab Mansour gate. Named after the architect, El-Mansour, completed in 1732 the design of the gate plays with Almohad patterns. Meknes Morocco
  • Bab Mansour gate, named after the architect, El-Mansour, completed in 1732. The design of the gate plays with Almohad patterns. It has zellij mosaics and the marble columns were taken from the Roman ruins of Volubilis. Meknes, Morocco
  • Zellij mosaics and arabesque Moorish plasterwork of the Bab Mansour gate. Named after the architect, El-Mansour, completed in 1732 the design of the gate plays with Almohad patterns. Meknes Morocco
  • Zellij mosaics and arabesque Moorish plasterwork of the Bab Mansour gate. Named after the architect, El-Mansour, completed in 1732 the design of the gate plays with Almohad patterns. Meknes Morocco
  • Bab Mansour gate, named after the architect, El-Mansour, completed in 1732. The design of the gate plays with Almohad patterns. It has zellij mosaics and the marble columns were taken from the Roman ruins of Volubilis. Meknes, Morocco
  • Bab Mansour gate, named after the architect, El-Mansour, completed in 1732. The design of the gate plays with Almohad patterns. It has zellij mosaics and the marble columns were taken from the Roman ruins of Volubilis. Meknes, Morocco
  • Bab Mansour gate, named after the architect, El-Mansour, completed in 1732. The design of the gate plays with Almohad patterns. It has zellij mosaics and the marble columns were taken from the Roman ruins of Volubilis. Meknes, Morocco
  • Zellij mosaics and arabesque Moorish plasterwork of the Bab Mansour gate. Named after the architect, El-Mansour, completed in 1732 the design of the gate plays with Almohad patterns. Meknes Morocco
  • Zellij mosaics and arabesque Moorish plasterwork of the Bab Mansour gate. Named after the architect, El-Mansour, completed in 1732 the design of the gate plays with Almohad patterns. Meknes Morocco
  • Zellij mosaics and arabesque Moorish plasterwork of the Bab Mansour gate. Named after the architect, El-Mansour, completed in 1732 the design of the gate plays with Almohad patterns. Meknes Morocco
  • Zellij mosaics and arabesque Moorish plasterwork of the Bab Mansour gate. Named after the architect, El-Mansour, completed in 1732 the design of the gate plays with Almohad patterns. Meknes Morocco
  • Anglo Saxon cross shaft fragment - 800-899. The sculptures in the sandstone cross are geomentric patterns known as interlace or knot-work. Lindisfarne Abbey Museum, Holy Island, Northumberland, England
  • A typical Anglo Saxon grave cover raised cross fragment decporated with raised interlaced patterns from 800-899. Lindisfarne Abbey Museum, Northumbria, England
  • A typical Anglo Saxon grave cover raised cross fragment decporated with raised interlaced patterns from 800-899. Lindisfarne Abbey Museum, Northumbria, England
  • A typical Anglo Saxon grave cover raised cross fragment decporated with raised interlaced patterns from 800-899. Lindisfarne Abbey Museum, Northumbria, England
  • A typical Anglo Saxon grave cover raised cross fragment decporated with raised interlaced patterns from 800-899. Lindisfarne Abbey Museum, Northumbria, England
  • Patterns in the cobble pavement, Ermoupolis, Syros Island [ ????? ] , Greek Cyclades Islands
  • Patterns in the cobble pavement, Ermoupolis, Syros Island [ ????? ] , Greek Cyclades Islands
  • Decorated columns with zig zag mosaic patterns of the cloisters of Monreale Cathedral - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • The Minoan decorated ritual Ewer From Poros with marine reliefs ,Poros Heraklion 1450 BC; Heraklion Archaeological  Museum, white background<br />
<br />
This elegant Ewer excavated from Poros is a fine example of the matute marine style of Minoan Ewer. The body is covered with  calligraphic network of dotted scale patterns, indicating the sea, in which nautili swim amongst rocks and seaweed. This style of Ewer was made in specialist workshops in the Knossos area and can be attributed to the same worksop that made ewers excavated from Zakros room IV-V. and another in Marseilles Museum
  • The Minoan decorated ritual Ewer From Poros with marine reliefs ,Poros Heraklion 1450 BC; Heraklion Archaeological  Museum, black background<br />
<br />
This elegant Ewer excavated from Poros is a fine example of the matute marine style of Minoan Ewer. The body is covered with  calligraphic network of dotted scale patterns, indicating the sea, in which nautili swim amongst rocks and seaweed. This style of Ewer was made in specialist workshops in the Knossos area and can be attributed to the same worksop that made ewers excavated from Zakros room IV-V. and another in Marseilles Museum
  • Cycladic conical rhython with spiral decorations.   Cycladic (1650-1450 BC) , Phylakopi III, Melos. National Archaeological Museum Athens.  Cat no 5791.  Gray background.<br />
<br />
<br />
Ceramic shapes and painted style are heavily influenced by Minoan styles during this period. Dark floral and spiral patterns are painted over a lighted backgound with wavy bands.
  • Bridge spouted jug bird decorated. Early Cycladic I (1650-1550 BC); Phylakopi; Melos. National Archaeological Museum Athens. Cat No 5768. Black background.<br />
<br />
<br />
During this Cycladic period the pottery designs were heavily influenced by Cretean minoan with pottery like this using bird patterns.
  • Bridge spouted jug bird decorated. Early Cycladic I (1650-1550 BC); Phylakopi; Melos. National Archaeological Museum Athens. Cat No 5768.  Grey background.<br />
<br />
<br />
During this Cycladic period the pottery designs were heavily influenced by Cretean minoan with pottery like this using bird patterns.
  • Bridge spouted jug bird decorated. Early Cycladic I (1650-1550 BC); Phylakopi; Melos. National Archaeological Museum Athens. Cat No 5768.<br />
<br />
During this Cycladic period the pottery designs were heavily influenced by Cretean minoan with pottery like this using bird patterns.
  • Beak spouted jug decorated with flowering crocus. Early Cycladic I (1650-1550 BC) , Phylakopi, Melos. National Archaeological Museum Athens. Cat No 5769.  Gray background.<br />
<br />
<br />
During this Cycladic period the pottery designs were heavily influenced by Cretean minoan with pottery like this using floral patterns.
  • Cycladic terracotta 'frying pan' with incied decoration from  Syros. Early found  at Phylakopi, Melos. Cycladic period III 2300-2000 BC), National Archaeological Museum Athens, Cat No 6172.  Grey background.<br />
<br />
<br />
These so called 'frying pans' wre created by the Keros-Syros culture and are their useage is uncertain. The compex geometric patterns on their bases suggest that they may have had some symbolic meaning and were used in religious of magical rituals. They could also have served practical purposes being used as dishes, mirror mounts, astrolabes or metris measured for salt traders.
  • Cycladic terracotta 'frying pan' with incied decoration from  Syros. Early found  at Phylakopi, Melos. Cycladic period III 2300-2000 BC), National Archaeological Museum Athens, Cat No 6172.<br />
<br />
These so called 'frying pans' wre created by the Keros-Syros culture and are their useage is uncertain. The compex geometric patterns on their bases suggest that they may have had some symbolic meaning and were used in religious of magical rituals. They could also have served practical purposes being used as dishes, mirror mounts, astrolabes or metris measured for salt traders.
  • Cycladic terracotta 'frying pan' with incied star decoration from Chalandriani, Syros. Early Cycladic period II 2800-2300 BC), National Archaeological Museum Athens, Cat No 5153.  Grey background.<br />
<br />
<br />
These so called 'frying pans' wre created by the Keros-Syros culture and are their useage is uncertain. The compex geometric patterns on their bases suggest that they may have had some symbolic meaning and were used in religious of magical rituals. They could also have served practical purposes being used as dishes, mirror mounts, astrolabes or metris measured for salt traders.
  • Cycladic terracotta 'frying pan' with incied star decoration from Chalandriani, Syros. Early Cycladic period II 2800-2300 BC), National Archaeological Museum Athens, Cat No 5153.<br />
<br />
These so called 'frying pans' wre created by the Keros-Syros culture and are their useage is uncertain. The compex geometric patterns on their bases suggest that they may have had some symbolic meaning and were used in religious of magical rituals. They could also have served practical purposes being used as dishes, mirror mounts, astrolabes or metris measured for salt traders.
  • Cycladic terracotta 'frying pan' with incied star decoration from Chalandriani, Syros. Early Cycladic period II 2800-2300 BC), National Archaeological Museum Athens, Cat No 5164.<br />
<br />
In the middle of the decoration is a disc surrounded by a triangle motif. Above the handle is incised a pubic triangle.<br />
<br />
These so called 'frying pans' wre created by the Keros-Syros culture and are their useage is uncertain. The compex geometric patterns on their bases suggest that they may have had some symbolic meaning and were used in religious of magical rituals. They could also have served practical purposes being used as dishes, mirror mounts, astrolabes or metris measured for salt traders.
  • Cycladic terracotta 'frying pan' with incied linear decoration from Chalandriani, Syros. Early Cycladic period II 2800-2300 BC), National Archaeological Museum Athens, Cat No 5012. Black background.<br />
<br />
These so called 'frying pans' wre created by the Keros-Syros culture and are their useage is uncertain. The compex geometric patterns on their bases suggest that they may have had some symbolic meaning and were used in religious of magical rituals. They could also have served practical purposes being used as dishes, mirror mounts, astrolabes or metris measured for salt traders.
  • Cycladic terracotta 'frying pan' with incied star decoration from Chalandriani, Syros. Early Cycladic period II 2800-2300 BC), National Archaeological Museum Athens, Cat No 5164.  Gray background.<br />
<br />
<br />
In the middle of the decoration is a disc surrounded by a triangle motif. Above the handle is incised a pubic triangle.<br />
<br />
These so called 'frying pans' wre created by the Keros-Syros culture and are their useage is uncertain. The compex geometric patterns on their bases suggest that they may have had some symbolic meaning and were used in religious of magical rituals. They could also have served practical purposes being used as dishes, mirror mounts, astrolabes or metris measured for salt traders.
  • Cycladic terracotta 'frying pan' with incied spiral decoration from Chalandriani, Syros. Early Cycladic period II 2800-2300 BC), National Archaeological Museum Athens, Cat No 5058.<br />
<br />
These so called 'frying pans' wre created by the Keros-Syros culture and are their useage is uncertain. The compex geometric patterns on their bases suggest that they may have had some symbolic meaning and were used in religious of magical rituals. They could also have served practical purposes being used as dishes, mirror mounts, astrolabes or metris measured for salt traders.
  • Cycladic terracotta 'frying pan' with incied spiral decoration from Chalandriani, Syros. Early Cycladic period II 2800-2300 BC), National Archaeological Museum Athens,  Gray background.<br />
<br />
<br />
These so called 'frying pans' wre created by the Keros-Syros culture and are their useage is uncertain. The compex geometric patterns on their bases suggest that they may have had some symbolic meaning and were used in religious of magical rituals. They could also have served practical purposes being used as dishes, mirror mounts, astrolabes or metris measured for salt traders.
  • Cycladic terracotta 'frying pan' with incied spiral decoration from Chalandriani, Syros. Early Cycladic period II 2800-2300 BC), National Archaeological Museum Athens, Cat No 6177.<br />
<br />
These so called 'frying pans' wre created by the Keros-Syros culture and are their useage is uncertain. The compex geometric patterns on their bases suggest that they may have had some symbolic meaning and were used in religious of magical rituals. They could also have served practical purposes being used as dishes, mirror mounts, astrolabes or metris measured for salt traders.
  • Cycladic terracotta 'frying pan' with incied boat and spiral decoration from Chalandriani, Syros. Early Cycladic period II 2800-2300 BC), National Archaeological Museum Athens, Cat No 4974. Black background.<br />
<br />
Yje incised decorations depict a boat amongst spiral formed waves. The boats is of a Ctcladic design  found throughout the Aegean.<br />
<br />
These so called 'frying pans' wre created by the Keros-Syros culture and are their useage is uncertain. The compex geometric patterns on their bases suggest that they may have had some symbolic meaning and were used in religious of magical rituals. They could also have served practical purposes being used as dishes, mirror mounts, astrolabes or metris measured for salt traders.
  • Cycladic terracotta 'frying pan' with incied boat and spiral decoration from Chalandriani, Syros. Early Cycladic period II 2800-2300 BC), National Archaeological Museum Athens, Cat No 4974.   White background.<br />
<br />
<br />
Yje incised decorations depict a boat amongst spiral formed waves. The boats is of a Ctcladic design  found throughout the Aegean.<br />
<br />
These so called 'frying pans' wre created by the Keros-Syros culture and are their useage is uncertain. The compex geometric patterns on their bases suggest that they may have had some symbolic meaning and were used in religious of magical rituals. They could also have served practical purposes being used as dishes, mirror mounts, astrolabes or metris measured for salt traders.
  • Cycladic terracotta 'frying pan' with incied boat and spiral decoration from Chalandriani, Syros. Early Cycladic period II 2800-2300 BC), National Archaeological Museum Athens, Cat No 4974<br />
<br />
Yje incised decorations depict a boat amongst spiral formed waves. The boats is of a Ctcladic design  found throughout the Aegean.<br />
<br />
These so called 'frying pans' wre created by the Keros-Syros culture and are their useage is uncertain. The compex geometric patterns on their bases suggest that they may have had some symbolic meaning and were used in religious of magical rituals. They could also have served practical purposes being used as dishes, mirror mounts, astrolabes or metris measured for salt traders.
  • Cycladic terracotta 'frying pan' with incied boat and spiral decoration from Chalandriani, Syros. Early Cycladic period II 2800-2300 BC), National Archaeological Museum Athens, Cat No 4974.   Gray background.<br />
<br />
<br />
Yje incised decorations depict a boat amongst spiral formed waves. The boats is of a Ctcladic design  found throughout the Aegean.<br />
<br />
These so called 'frying pans' wre created by the Keros-Syros culture and are their useage is uncertain. The compex geometric patterns on their bases suggest that they may have had some symbolic meaning and were used in religious of magical rituals. They could also have served practical purposes being used as dishes, mirror mounts, astrolabes or metris measured for salt traders.
  • Pictures & images of Aynali Kilise (Church) cave church interior frescoes, iconoclastic period (725-842), near Goreme, Cappadocia, Nevsehir, Turkey<br />
<br />
During the iconoclastic period (725-842) it was forbidden to depict any religious figures in the Orthodox Church so interiors were decorated with simple red and white geometric patterns and crosses.
  • Pictures & images of Aynali Kilise (Church) cave church interior frescoes, iconoclastic period (725-842), near Goreme, Cappadocia, Nevsehir, Turkey<br />
<br />
During the iconoclastic period (725-842) it was forbidden to depict any religious figures in the Orthodox Church so interiors were decorated with simple red and white geometric patterns and crosses.
  • Phrygian terra Cotta vessel with a strainer and a long pouring lip with geometric painted patterns from Gordion. Phrygian Collection, 9th century BC - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations Ankara. Turkey. Against a white background
  • Phrygian terra Cotta vessel with a strainer and a long pouring lip with geometric painted patterns from Gordion. Phrygian Collection, 9th century BC - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations Ankara. Turkey.
  • Phrygian terra Cotta vessel with a strainer and a long pouring lip with geometric painted patterns from Gordion. Phrygian Collection, 9th century BC - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations Ankara. Turkey. Against a black background
  • Phrygian terra Cotta vessel with a strainer and a long pouring lip with geometric painted patterns from Gordion. Phrygian Collection, 9th century BC - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations Ankara. Turkey.
  • Phrygian terra Cotta vessel with a strainer and a long pouring lip with geometric painted patterns from Gordion. Phrygian Collection, 9th century BC - Museum of Anatolian Civilisations Ankara. Turkey. Against a grey background
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Dogerr, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Doger, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Phrygian temple of Aslankaya, 7th century BC. Phyrigian Valley, Emre Lake, near Döğer, Turkey.<br />
<br />
On the triangular roof over the facade are two sphinxes (winged figures with the head of a human and the body of a lion), facing one another, take place. In the main facade, below, the sphinxes in a niche, a cult statue of Kybele or the Great Mother (vandalised and destroyed) was flanked by two lions. This main facade is ornamented with relief geometrical patterns.
  • Close up picture of the Roman mosaics of the Kitchen floor depicting geometric mosaic patterns, room no 19 at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Close up picture of the Roman mosaics of the Room with Star Shaped Decorations depicting a braid geometric mosaic patterns, room no 18 at the Villa Romana del Casale, first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting two Peacocks - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
<br />
The patterns of peacock tails contain round decorations. These were seen to be the symbolic eyes of omnipotence and often ascribed to the Archangel Michael. The peacock’s feather is sometimes associated with St. Barbara Also, The peacock, (due to an ancient myth that Peacock flesh did not decay), is seen as a symbol of immortality.<br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting two Peacocks - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
<br />
The patterns of peacock tails contain round decorations. These were seen to be the symbolic eyes of omnipotence and often ascribed to the Archangel Michael. The peacock’s feather is sometimes associated with St. Barbara Also, The peacock, (due to an ancient myth that Peacock flesh did not decay), is seen as a symbol of immortality.<br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • Bab Mansour gate, named after the architect, El-Mansour, completed in 1732. The design of the gate plays with Almohad patterns. It has zellij mosaics and the marble columns were taken from the Roman ruins of Volubilis. Meknes, Morocco
  • Zellij mosaics and arabesque Moorish plasterwork of the Bab Mansour gate. Named after the architect, El-Mansour, completed in 1732 the design of the gate plays with Almohad patterns. Meknes Morocco
  • Zellij mosaics and arabesque Moorish plasterwork of the Bab Mansour gate. Named after the architect, El-Mansour, completed in 1732 the design of the gate plays with Almohad patterns. Meknes Morocco
  • Zellij mosaics and arabesque Moorish plasterwork of the Bab Mansour gate. Named after the architect, El-Mansour, completed in 1732 the design of the gate plays with Almohad patterns. Meknes Morocco
  • Bab Mansour gate, named after the architect, El-Mansour, completed in 1732. The design of the gate plays with Almohad patterns. It has zellij mosaics and the marble columns were taken from the Roman ruins of Volubilis. Meknes, Morocco
  • Zellij mosaics and arabesque Moorish plasterwork of the Bab Mansour gate. Named after the architect, El-Mansour, completed in 1732 the design of the gate plays with Almohad patterns. Meknes Morocco
  • Zellij mosaics and arabesque Moorish plasterwork of the Bab Mansour gate. Named after the architect, El-Mansour, completed in 1732 the design of the gate plays with Almohad patterns. Meknes Morocco
  • Anglo Saxon cross shaft fragment - 800-899. The sculptures in the sandstone cross are geomentric patterns known as interlace or knot-work. Lindisfarne Abbey Museum, Holy Island, Northumberland, England
  • Anglo Saxon cross shaft fragment - 800-899. The sculptures in the sandstone cross are geomentric patterns known as interlace or knot-work. Lindisfarne Abbey Museum, Holy Island, Northumberland, England
  • Anglo Saxon cross shaft fragment - 800-899. The sculptures in the sandstone cross are geomentric patterns known as interlace or knot-work. Lindisfarne Abbey Museum, Holy Island, Northumberland, England
  • Anglo Saxon cross shaft fragment, 875-999. The cross depicts Christ seated in a halo with two figures above blowing trumpets and two figures below with a horn or a scroll, possibly a last judgement scene. Below are sculpted interlaced patterns. Lindisfarne Abbey Museum, Holy Island, Northumberland, England
  • Anglo Saxon cross shaft fragment, 875-999. The cross depicts Christ seated in a halo with two figures above blowing trumpets and two figures below with a horn or a scroll, possibly a last judgement scene. Below are sculpted interlaced patterns. Lindisfarne Abbey Museum, Holy Island, Northumberland, England
  • Anglo Saxon cross shaft fragment, 875-999. The cross depicts Christ seated in a halo with two figures above blowing trumpets and two figures below with a horn or a scroll, possibly a last judgement scene. Below are sculpted interlaced patterns. Lindisfarne Abbey Museum, Holy Island, Northumberland, England
  • Anglo Saxon cross shaft fragment, 875-999. The cross depicts Christ seated in a halo with two figures above blowing trumpets and two figures below with a horn or a scroll, possibly a last judgement scene. Below are sculpted interlaced patterns. Lindisfarne Abbey Museum, Holy Island, Northumberland, England
  • Patterns in the cobble pavement, Ermoupolis, Syros Island [ ????? ] , Greek Cyclades Islands

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ABOUT

FunkyStock Picture Library free resource for professional editorial picture editors, picture researchers, historical scholars and students and enthusiasts who want to browse some of the best pictures and images of historic countries, historical places, archaeological sites and the very best museum antiquities and artefacts exhibits in Europe and the Middle East.

Pictures and Images can be downloaded or bought as stock photos or photo art prints.

COUNTRIES

Browse travel pictures and images of historic places and archaeological sites of countries in Europe and the Middle East.

VIEW COUNTRIES INDEX....

HISTORICAL

Explore the past through pictures and images of its historic places. See the great palaces, castles and cities of antiquity as well as the great archaeological sites where our ancestors made history.

EXPLORE HISTORICAL PLACES...

MUSEUMS

Browse pictures & images the treasured artefacts and antiquities exhibits from the great Museum of Europe and the Middle East. See the art and objects made by our ancestors.

SEE MUESEUM ANTIQUITIES....