• Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Tree Graces from the South Building, Second storey, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. Apollo sits on his raised platform with his tripod at his oracular shrine. He is approached by 2 figures one with the flat diadem of a king who have come to consult him. Cut Out
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Tree Graces from the South Building, Second storey, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. Apollo sits on his raised platform with his tripod at his oracular shrine. He is approached by 2 figures one with the flat diadem of a king who have come to consult him. Cut Out
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Tree Graces from the South Building, Second storey, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. Apollo sits on his raised platform with his tripod at his oracular shrine. He is approached by 2 figures one with the flat diadem of a king who have come to consult him. Cut Out
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Ethnos with belted peplos, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a white background.<br />
<br />
The matronly figure wears a belted classical dress (peplos) and held her long cloak up behind. The square hole above her shoulder with a corresponding hole in the back, was for lifting the finished relief into the ancient building by crane.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Ethnos with belted peplos, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
The matronly figure wears a belted classical dress (peplos) and held her long cloak up behind. The square hole above her shoulder with a corresponding hole in the back, was for lifting the finished relief into the ancient building by crane.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Ethnos with belted peplos, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. <br />
<br />
The matronly figure wears a belted classical dress (peplos) and held her long cloak up behind. The square hole above her shoulder with a corresponding hole in the back, was for lifting the finished relief into the ancient building by crane.
  • Bronze statue of Roman empress Julia Aquilia Severa found at Sparta. circa 221-222 AD.  Athens National Archaeological Museum, Cat No X23321. Against white.<br />
<br />
The women in the Bronze statue wears a Chiton and himation and would have had a crwon on her head. The hair style is typical of the Severan dynisty. Julia Aquilia was the last wife of emperor Elagobalus (218-222 AD) and the damage to the statue is due to a building collapsing on it after a fire circa 221-222 AD
  • Bronze statue of Roman empress Julia Aquilia Severa found at Sparta. circa 221-222 AD.  Athens National Archaeological Museum, Cat No X23321. Against black<br />
<br />
The women in the Bronze statue wears a Chiton and himation and would have had a crwon on her head. The hair style is typical of the Severan dynisty. Julia Aquilia was the last wife of emperor Elagobalus (218-222 AD) and the damage to the statue is due to a building collapsing on it after a fire circa 221-222 AD
  • Bronze statue of Roman empress Julia Aquilia Severa found at Sparta. circa 221-222 AD.  Athens National Archaeological Museum, Cat No X23321. Against grey.<br />
<br />
The women in the Bronze statue wears a Chiton and himation and would have had a crwon on her head. The hair style is typical of the Severan dynisty. Julia Aquilia was the last wife of emperor Elagobalus (218-222 AD) and the damage to the statue is due to a building collapsing on it after a fire circa 221-222 AD
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Ethnos with belted peplos, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.   Against a black background.<br />
<br />
The matronly figure wears a belted classical dress (peplos) and held her long cloak up behind. The square hole above her shoulder with a corresponding hole in the back, was for lifting the finished relief into the ancient building by crane.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of Ethnos with belted peplos, Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against an art background.<br />
<br />
The matronly figure wears a belted classical dress (peplos) and held her long cloak up behind. The square hole above her shoulder with a corresponding hole in the back, was for lifting the finished relief into the ancient building by crane.
  • Bronze statue of Roman empress Julia Aquilia Severa found at Sparta. circa 221-222 AD.  Athens National Archaeological Museum, Cat No X23321. Against grey.<br />
<br />
The women in the Bronze statue wears a Chiton and himation and would have had a crwon on her head. The hair style is typical of the Severan dynisty. Julia Aquilia was the last wife of emperor Elagobalus (218-222 AD) and the damage to the statue is due to a building collapsing on it after a fire circa 221-222 AD
  • Bronze statue of Roman empress Julia Aquilia Severa found at Sparta. circa 221-222 AD.  Athens National Archaeological Museum, Cat No X23321.<br />
<br />
The women in the Bronze statue wears a Chiton and himation and would have had a crwon on her head. The hair style is typical of the Severan dynisty. Julia Aquilia was the last wife of emperor Elagobalus (218-222 AD) and the damage to the statue is due to a building collapsing on it after a fire circa 221-222 AD
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD excavated from the S. Barbiana region near the Station Terminus, Rome. Hadrian ( Publius Aelius Hadrianus Augustus) was Roman Emperor from 117 to 138. An enthusiastic  builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors. The great love of his life was Antinous who died tragically and suspiciously when he drowned in the Nile.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD excavated from the S. Barbiana region near the Station Terminus, Rome. Hadrian ( Publius Aelius Hadrianus Augustus) was Roman Emperor from 117 to 138. An enthusiastic  builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors. The great love of his life was Antinous who died tragically and suspiciously when he drowned in the Nile.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD excavated from the S. Barbiana region near the Station Terminus, Rome. Hadrian ( Publius Aelius Hadrianus Augustus) was Roman Emperor from 117 to 138. An enthusiastic  builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors. The great love of his life was Antinous who died tragically and suspiciously when he drowned in the Nile.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD excavated from the S. Barbiana region near the Station Terminus, Rome. Hadrian ( Publius Aelius Hadrianus Augustus) was Roman Emperor from 117 to 138. An enthusiastic  builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors. The great love of his life was Antinous who died tragically and suspiciously when he drowned in the Nile.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Roman portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD excavated from the S. Barbiana region near the Station Terminus, Rome. Hadrian ( Publius Aelius Hadrianus Augustus) was Roman Emperor from 117 to 138. An enthusiastic  builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors. The great love of his life was Antinous who died tragically and suspiciously when he drowned in the Nile.  The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Tree Graces from the South Building, Second storey, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints.
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Emperor Claudius About to vanquish Britanica from Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. Naked warrior Claudius id about to deliver the death blow to Britanica.   From The South Building, Rooms 1-3, Mythological Releifs.
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Emperor Claudius About to vanquish Britanica from Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. Naked warrior Claudius id about to deliver the death blow to Britanica.   From The South Building, Rooms 1-3, Mythological Releifs.
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Emperor Claudius About to vanquish Britanica from Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Buy as stock or photo art prints. Naked warrior Claudius id about to deliver the death blow to Britanica.   From The South Building, Rooms 1-3, Mythological Releifs.
  • 10th century Romanesque San Michele in Foro is a Roman Catholic basilica church in the old Roman Forum of Lucca, Tunscany, Italy
  • 10th century Romanesque San Michele in Foro is a Roman Catholic basilica church in the old Roman Forum of Lucca, Tunscany, Italy
  • Close up of the Arcades and corner of St Michele of the 13th century Romanesque facade of the San Michele in Foro,  a Roman Catholic basilica church in Lucca, Tunscany, Italy
  • Upper arcades and statue of St Michele of the 13th century Romanesque facade of the San Michele in Foro,  a Roman Catholic basilica church in Lucca, Tunscany, Italy
  • Close up of the Arcades columns & statues of St Michele of the 13th century Romanesque facade of the San Michele in Foro,  a Roman Catholic basilica church in Lucca, Tunscany, Italy
  • Close up of the Arcades columns & statues of St Michele of the 13th century Romanesque facade of the San Michele in Foro,  a Roman Catholic basilica church in Lucca, Tunscany, Italy
  • Close up of the Arcades and and columns of St Michele of the 13th century Romanesque facade of the San Michele in Foro,  a Roman Catholic basilica church in Lucca, Tunscany, Italy
  • Detail of the Rose window  of San Michele in Foro is a Roman Catholic basilica church in Lucca, Tunscany, Italy
  • Panorama of the Arcades of St Michele of the 13th century Romanesque facade of the San Michele in Foro,  a Roman Catholic basilica church in Lucca, Tunscany, Italy
  • Upper arcades and statue of St Michele of the 13th century Romanesque facade of the San Michele in Foro,  a Roman Catholic basilica church in Lucca, Tunscany, Italy
  • Close up of the Arcades and and columns of St Michele of the 13th century Romanesque facade of the San Michele in Foro,  a Roman Catholic basilica church in Lucca, Tunscany, Italy
  • Close up of the statue of St Michele of the 13th century Romanesque facade of the San Michele in Foro,  a Roman Catholic basilica church in Lucca, Tunscany, Italy
  • Detail of the 13th century Romanesque facade of the San Michele in Foro,  a Roman Catholic basilica church in Lucca, Tunscany, Italy
  • 10th century San Michele in Foro is a Roman Catholic basilica church in Lucca, facade 13h century Romanesque , Tunscany, Italy
  • Close up of the Arcades columns & statues of St Michele of the 13th century Romanesque facade of the San Michele in Foro,  a Roman Catholic basilica church in Lucca, Tunscany, Italy
  • 13th century Romanesque facade of the San Michele in Foro is a Roman Catholic basilica church in Lucca, Tunscany, Italy
  • Detail of the Romanesque main entrance of San Michele in Foro is a Roman Catholic basilica church in Lucca, Tunscany, Italy
  • 13th century Romanesque facade and campinale of the San Michele in Foro is a Roman Catholic basilica church in Lucca, Tunscany, Italy
  • Close up of the statue of St Michele of the 13th century Romanesque facade of the San Michele in Foro,  a Roman Catholic basilica church in Lucca, Tunscany, Italy
  • Angled Detail of the 13th century Romanesque facade of the San Michele in Foro,  a Roman Catholic basilica church in Lucca, Tunscany, Italy
  • Close up of the Arcades and corner of St Michele of the 13th century Romanesque facade of the San Michele in Foro,  a Roman Catholic basilica church in Lucca, Tunscany, Italy
  • Close up of the Arcades of St Michele of the 13th century Romanesque facade of the San Michele in Foro,  a Roman Catholic basilica church in Lucca, Tunscany, Italy
  • Detail of the Romanesque sculptures and Rose Window of the main entrance of San Michele in Foro is a Roman Catholic basilica church in Lucca, Tunscany, Italy
  • Detail of the Romanesque sculptures of the main entrance of San Michele in Foro is a Roman Catholic basilica church in Lucca, Tunscany, Italy
  • Upper arcades of the 13th century Romanesque facade of the San Michele in Foro,  a Roman Catholic basilica church in Lucca, Tunscany, Italy
  • 13th century facade and campinale of the San Michele in Foro is a Roman Catholic basilica church in Lucca, Tunscany, Italy
  • Detail of the Romanesque sculptures of the main entrance of San Michele in Foro is a Roman Catholic basilica church in Lucca, Tunscany, Italy
  • 13th century facade of the San Michele in Foro is a Roman Catholic basilica church in Lucca, Tunscany, Italy
  • 13th century facade of the San Michele in Foro is a Roman Catholic basilica church in Lucca, Tunscany, Italy
  • Close up of the Arcades columns & statues of St Michele of the 13th century Romanesque facade of the San Michele in Foro,  a Roman Catholic basilica church in Lucca, Tunscany, Italy
  • 13th century Romanesque facade of the San Michele in Foro is a Roman Catholic basilica church in Lucca, Tunscany, Italy
  • Detail of the Romanesque sculptures of the main entrance of San Michele in Foro is a Roman Catholic basilica church in Lucca, Tunscany, Italy
  • 13th century Romanesque facade of the San Michele in Foro is a Roman Catholic basilica church in Lucca, Tunscany, Italy
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Roman sculptural decorations  on  The Arch Of Constantine built to celebrate victory over Maxentius . Rome. Rome
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Hadrian's Villa ( Villa Adriana ) 2nd century AD - The Maritime Theatre (  Teatro Marittimo ), so called because of its shape and marine architectural decorations such as Tritons, is at the centre of Hadrian's Villa complex.  At its centre of the Teatro Marittimo is a circular islet surrounded  by a water filled moat which in turn is surrounded by a circular barrel vaulted portico with 40 Ionic columns. The circular building on the islet consisted of rooms that surrounded a central peristyle which was probably a retreat for Hadrian to escape to. Villa Adriana, Tivoli, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Byzantine mosaics at the Palatine Chapel ( Capella Palatina ) Norman Palace Palermo, Sicily, Ittaly. Building the tower of Babel.
  • Pictures of Dun Carloway Broch on the Isle of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides, Scotland. Brochs are among Scotland's most impressive prehistoric buildings and were the precursors of the Medieval Scottish Tower Houses. The world Broch is derived from lowland scots who called forts Brough from the old Norse Borg. <br />
<br />
Broch stone roundhouses date from about 2,300 to 1,900 years ago, and are found mainly in north and west Scotland. Dun Carloway Broch was probably built around the time of the Roman occupation in Britain in 43AD and was probably the primary dwelling-places for the principal family in the area. Dun Carloway Broch would have provided some protection against sporadic raiding, but were not purely defensive structure but a focal point for the clan of the area.
  • The Roman Columns of The Building of Eumachia, Pompeii. The inscription on lintel above the columns is to Concordia Augusta, wife of Emperor Augustus, from the priestess Eumachia the patron of the "fullones", an artisan association of dyers. The building was a prototype of medieval hostels were travelling merchant rented accommodation.
  • The Roman Columns of The Building of Eumachia, Pompeii. The inscription on lintel above the columns is to Concordia Augusta, wife of Emperor Augustus, from the priestess Eumachia the patron of the "fullones", an artisan association of dyers. The building was a prototype of medieval hostels were travelling merchant rented accommodation.
  • The Roman Columns of The Building of Eumachia, Pompeii. The inscription on lintel above the columns is to Concordia Augusta, wife of Emperor Augustus, from the priestess Eumachia the patron of the "fullones", an artisan association of dyers. The building was a prototype of medieval hostels were travelling merchant rented accommodation.
  • The Roman Columns of The Building of Eumachia, Pompeii. The inscription on lintel above the columns is to Concordia Augusta, wife of Emperor Augustus, from the priestess Eumachia the patron of the "fullones", an artisan association of dyers. The building was a prototype of medieval hostels were travelling merchant rented accommodation.
  • The Roman Columns of The Building of Eumachia, Pompeii. The inscription on lintel above the columns is to Concordia Augusta, wife of Emperor Augustus, from the priestess Eumachia the patron of the "fullones", an artisan association of dyers. The building was a prototype of medieval hostels were travelling merchant rented accommodation.
  • The Roman Columns of The Building of Eumachia, Pompeii. The inscription on lintel above the columns is to Concordia Augusta, wife of Emperor Augustus, from the priestess Eumachia the patron of the "fullones", an artisan association of dyers. The building was a prototype of medieval hostels were travelling merchant rented accommodation.
  • The Roman Columns of The Building of Eumachia, Pompeii. The inscription on lintel above the columns is to Concordia Augusta, wife of Emperor Augustus, from the priestess Eumachia the patron of the "fullones", an artisan association of dyers. The building was a prototype of medieval hostels were travelling merchant rented accommodation.
  • North wall mosaics depicting the building of the tower of Babel in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • The Roman Columns of The Building of Eumachia, Pompeii. The inscription on lintel above the columns is to Concordia Augusta, wife of Emperor Augustus, from the priestess Eumachia the patron of the "fullones", an artisan association of dyers. The building was a prototype of medieval hostels were travelling merchant rented accommodation.
  • North wall mosaics depicting the building of the tower of Babel in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting the building of the tower of Babel in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • North wall mosaics depicting the building of the tower of Babel in the Norman-Byzantine medieval cathedral  of Monreale,  province of Palermo, Sicily, Italy.
  • Exterior panoramic of the Villa Romana del Casale, showing the protective roofs that have been erected to represent the original villas building heights,  first quarter of the 4th century AD. Sicily, Italy. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Medieval Byzantine mosaics of Noah building the arc, Monreale Cathedral, Sicily
  • Medieval Byzantine mosaics of Noah building the arc, Monreale Cathedral, Sicily
  • Roman marble portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD found in the Horti Tauriani, Rome.  The bust portrays an elderly Hadrian with a well worn expression from around 130AD. An enthusiastic builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors.  MC inv 890, Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD found in the Horti Tauriani, Rome.  The bust portrays an elderly Hadrian with a well worn expression from around 130AD. An enthusiastic builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors.  MC inv 890, Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD found in the Horti Tauriani, Rome.  The bust portrays an elderly Hadrian with a well worn expression from around 130AD. An enthusiastic builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors.  MC inv 890, Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD found in the Horti Tauriani, Rome.  The bust portrays an elderly Hadrian with a well worn expression from around 130AD. An enthusiastic builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors.  MC inv 890, Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Roman marble portrait bust of Emperor Hadrian, 117-138 AD found in the Horti Tauriani, Rome.  The bust portrays an elderly Hadrian with a well worn expression from around 130AD. An enthusiastic builder Hadrian rebuilt the Pantheon and constructed the Temple of Venus and Roma as well as building Hadrian's Wall, which marked the northern limit of Roman Britain. His villa at Tivoli also showed Hadrian passion for water and Roman baths. Hadrian was regarded by some as a humanist and was philhellene in most of his tastes. He is regarded as one of the Five Good Emperors.  MC inv 890, Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Pictures of Dun Carloway Broch on the Isle of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides, Scotland. Brochs are among Scotland's most impressive prehistoric buildings and were the precursors of the Medieval Scottish Tower Houses. The world Broch is derived from lowland scots who called forts Brough from the old Norse Borg. <br />
<br />
Broch stone roundhouses date from about 2,300 to 1,900 years ago, and are found mainly in north and west Scotland. Dun Carloway Broch was probably built around the time of the Roman occupation in Britain in 43AD and was probably the primary dwelling-places for the principal family in the area. Dun Carloway Broch would have provided some protection against sporadic raiding, but were not purely defensive structure but a focal point for the clan of the area.
  • Picture of Tomb Tomb 114 "tomb of curses" of the North Necropolis. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.<br />
<br />
TOMB 114 (Second half of the 2nd century AD) <br />
<br />
The tomb lies on the left hand side of the road and is enclosed by a perimeter wall; it rests on a base withifiree steps, with a bench piked(1 front of it. Inside are three beds and the ossuary. On the roof, a sarcophagus, broken as result of an <br />
earthquake, bears an inscription mentioning the occupant Aelios Apollinarios and his wife Neratia Apollonis. On the facade is an inscription of great interest which refers to the punishment inflicted on those who violate the sepulchre: as well as the usual fines, it invokes diseases, misfortunes and punishments in the next world. This inscription has led to the building being named the Tomb of the Curses.
  • Picture of  A18 of the Tomb North Necropolis. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.<br />
<br />
Tomb A 18 ( 1st century AD) <br />
<br />
The building, one of the most representative and best conserved of the North Necropolis, has the shape of a small temple, built to a square plan with regular walls. The facade is framed by projecting pilasters; the roofing slabs rest on the, two frontons and the lateral cornices.- Beneath the base is a subterranean chamber partially carved into of the rock. The two chambers have sepulchral beds along the walls.
  • Picture of  A18 of the Tomb North Necropolis. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.<br />
<br />
Tomb A 18 ( 1st century AD) <br />
<br />
The building, one of the most representative and best conserved of the North Necropolis, has the shape of a small temple, built to a square plan with regular walls. The facade is framed by projecting pilasters; the roofing slabs rest on the, two frontons and the lateral cornices.- Beneath the base is a subterranean chamber partially carved into of the rock. The two chambers have sepulchral beds along the walls.
  • Photo of Roman releif sculpture of Tree Graces from the South Building, Second storey, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas releifs. Aphrodisias Archaological Museum, Turkey
  • Byzantine mosaics in the Cathedral of Monreale- Building the Tower of Babel  - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Picture of the ruins of the Byzantine Martyrion of St Philip church and healing centre. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.<br />
<br />
Martyrion of St Philip. This church with an octagonal core was built at the beginning of the 5th century on the summit of the hill. This is probably where, according to tradition, the Apostlie was martyred. The building has an eight-sided central room surmounted by a wooden cupola. From each of the eight sides of the central space there was access to a rectangular room through three arches supported by marble columns with capitals decorated with acanthus leaves The shape of the central room is a reference to the number eight which symbolists eternity. The church is situated inside a square composed of 28 rooms for housing pilgrims which were accessed from the outside. As in other Byzantine sanctuaries associated with heating powers (eg that of Saints Cosmas and Damian in Constantinople), in these rooms incubation rites were practised: during sleep, the Saint cured the sick and made prophecies concerning the future.
  • Picture of the ruins of the Byzantine Martyrion of St Philip church and healing centre. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.<br />
<br />
Martyrion of St Philip. This church with an octagonal core was built at the beginning of the 5th century on the summit of the hill. This is probably where, according to tradition, the Apostlie was martyred. The building has an eight-sided central room surmounted by a wooden cupola. From each of the eight sides of the central space there was access to a rectangular room through three arches supported by marble columns with capitals decorated with acanthus leaves The shape of the central room is a reference to the number eight which symbolists eternity. The church is situated inside a square composed of 28 rooms for housing pilgrims which were accessed from the outside. As in other Byzantine sanctuaries associated with heating powers (eg that of Saints Cosmas and Damian in Constantinople), in these rooms incubation rites were practised: during sleep, the Saint cured the sick and made prophecies concerning the future.
  • Medieval Byzantine style mosaics of the Bible story of building Babel Palatine Chapel, Cappella Palatina, Palermo, Italy
  • The  Great Altar of the Upper market of Prgamon. The Altar building is reconstructed in the Pergamon Museum in Berlin. Pergamon (Bergama) Archaeological Site, Turkey
  • Picture of the ruins of the Byzantine Martyrion of St Philip church and healing centre. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.<br />
<br />
Martyrion of St Philip. This church with an octagonal core was built at the beginning of the 5th century on the summit of the hill. This is probably where, according to tradition, the Apostlie was martyred. The building has an eight-sided central room surmounted by a wooden cupola. From each of the eight sides of the central space there was access to a rectangular room through three arches supported by marble columns with capitals decorated with acanthus leaves The shape of the central room is a reference to the number eight which symbolists eternity. The church is situated inside a square composed of 28 rooms for housing pilgrims which were accessed from the outside. As in other Byzantine sanctuaries associated with heating powers (eg that of Saints Cosmas and Damian in Constantinople), in these rooms incubation rites were practised: during sleep, the Saint cured the sick and made prophecies concerning the future.
  • Medieval Byzantine style mosaics of the Bible story of building Babel Palatine Chapel, Cappella Palatina, Palermo, Italy
  • Picture of the ruins of the Byzantine Martyrion of St Philip church and healing centre. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.<br />
<br />
Martyrion of St Philip. This church with an octagonal core was built at the beginning of the 5th century on the summit of the hill. This is probably where, according to tradition, the Apostlie was martyred. The building has an eight-sided central room surmounted by a wooden cupola. From each of the eight sides of the central space there was access to a rectangular room through three arches supported by marble columns with capitals decorated with acanthus leaves The shape of the central room is a reference to the number eight which symbolists eternity. The church is situated inside a square composed of 28 rooms for housing pilgrims which were accessed from the outside. As in other Byzantine sanctuaries associated with heating powers (eg that of Saints Cosmas and Damian in Constantinople), in these rooms incubation rites were practised: during sleep, the Saint cured the sick and made prophecies concerning the future.
  • Picture of the ruins of the Byzantine Martyrion of St Philip church and healing centre. Hierapolis archaeological site near Pamukkale in Turkey.<br />
<br />
Martyrion of St Philip. This church with an octagonal core was built at the beginning of the 5th century on the summit of the hill. This is probably where, according to tradition, the Apostlie was martyred. The building has an eight-sided central room surmounted by a wooden cupola. From each of the eight sides of the central space there was access to a rectangular room through three arches supported by marble columns with capitals decorated with acanthus leaves The shape of the central room is a reference to the number eight which symbolists eternity. The church is situated inside a square composed of 28 rooms for housing pilgrims which were accessed from the outside. As in other Byzantine sanctuaries associated with heating powers (eg that of Saints Cosmas and Damian in Constantinople), in these rooms incubation rites were practised: during sleep, the Saint cured the sick and made prophecies concerning the future.
  • Pictures of Dun Carloway Broch on the Isle of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides, Scotland. Brochs are among Scotland's most impressive prehistoric buildings and were the precursors of the Medieval Scottish Tower Houses. The world Broch is derived from lowland scots who called forts Brough from the old Norse Borg. <br />
<br />
Broch stone roundhouses date from about 2,300 to 1,900 years ago, and are found mainly in north and west Scotland. Dun Carloway Broch was probably built around the time of the Roman occupation in Britain in 43AD and was probably the primary dwelling-places for the principal family in the area. Dun Carloway Broch would have provided some protection against sporadic raiding, but were not purely defensive structure but a focal point for the clan of the area.
  • Pictures of Dun Carloway Broch on the Isle of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides, Scotland. Brochs are among Scotland's most impressive prehistoric buildings and were the precursors of the Medieval Scottish Tower Houses. The world Broch is derived from lowland scots who called forts Brough from the old Norse Borg. <br />
<br />
Broch stone roundhouses date from about 2,300 to 1,900 years ago, and are found mainly in north and west Scotland. Dun Carloway Broch was probably built around the time of the Roman occupation in Britain in 43AD and was probably the primary dwelling-places for the principal family in the area. Dun Carloway Broch would have provided some protection against sporadic raiding, but were not purely defensive structure but a focal point for the clan of the area.
  • Pictures of Dun Carloway Broch on the Isle of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides, Scotland. Brochs are among Scotland's most impressive prehistoric buildings and were the precursors of the Medieval Scottish Tower Houses. The world Broch is derived from lowland scots who called forts Brough from the old Norse Borg. <br />
<br />
Broch stone roundhouses date from about 2,300 to 1,900 years ago, and are found mainly in north and west Scotland. Dun Carloway Broch was probably built around the time of the Roman occupation in Britain in 43AD and was probably the primary dwelling-places for the principal family in the area. Dun Carloway Broch would have provided some protection against sporadic raiding, but were not purely defensive structure but a focal point for the clan of the area.
  • Pictures of Dun Carloway Broch on the Isle of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides, Scotland. Brochs are among Scotland's most impressive prehistoric buildings and were the precursors of the Medieval Scottish Tower Houses. The world Broch is derived from lowland scots who called forts Brough from the old Norse Borg. <br />
<br />
Broch stone roundhouses date from about 2,300 to 1,900 years ago, and are found mainly in north and west Scotland. Dun Carloway Broch was probably built around the time of the Roman occupation in Britain in 43AD and was probably the primary dwelling-places for the principal family in the area. Dun Carloway Broch would have provided some protection against sporadic raiding, but were not purely defensive structure but a focal point for the clan of the area.
  • Pictures of Dun Carloway Broch on the Isle of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides, Scotland. Brochs are among Scotland's most impressive prehistoric buildings and were the precursors of the Medieval Scottish Tower Houses. The world Broch is derived from lowland scots who called forts Brough from the old Norse Borg. <br />
<br />
Broch stone roundhouses date from about 2,300 to 1,900 years ago, and are found mainly in north and west Scotland. Dun Carloway Broch was probably built around the time of the Roman occupation in Britain in 43AD and was probably the primary dwelling-places for the principal family in the area. Dun Carloway Broch would have provided some protection against sporadic raiding, but were not purely defensive structure but a focal point for the clan of the area.
  • Pictures of Dun Carloway Broch on the Isle of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides, Scotland. Brochs are among Scotland's most impressive prehistoric buildings and were the precursors of the Medieval Scottish Tower Houses. The world Broch is derived from lowland scots who called forts Brough from the old Norse Borg. <br />
<br />
Broch stone roundhouses date from about 2,300 to 1,900 years ago, and are found mainly in north and west Scotland. Dun Carloway Broch was probably built around the time of the Roman occupation in Britain in 43AD and was probably the primary dwelling-places for the principal family in the area. Dun Carloway Broch would have provided some protection against sporadic raiding, but were not purely defensive structure but a focal point for the clan of the area.
  • Pictures of Dun Carloway Broch on the Isle of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides, Scotland. Brochs are among Scotland's most impressive prehistoric buildings and were the precursors of the Medieval Scottish Tower Houses. The world Broch is derived from lowland scots who called forts Brough from the old Norse Borg. <br />
<br />
Broch stone roundhouses date from about 2,300 to 1,900 years ago, and are found mainly in north and west Scotland. Dun Carloway Broch was probably built around the time of the Roman occupation in Britain in 43AD and was probably the primary dwelling-places for the principal family in the area. Dun Carloway Broch would have provided some protection against sporadic raiding, but were not purely defensive structure but a focal point for the clan of the area.
  • Pictures of Dun Carloway Broch on the Isle of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides, Scotland. Brochs are among Scotland's most impressive prehistoric buildings and were the precursors of the Medieval Scottish Tower Houses. The world Broch is derived from lowland scots who called forts Brough from the old Norse Borg. <br />
<br />
Broch stone roundhouses date from about 2,300 to 1,900 years ago, and are found mainly in north and west Scotland. Dun Carloway Broch was probably built around the time of the Roman occupation in Britain in 43AD and was probably the primary dwelling-places for the principal family in the area. Dun Carloway Broch would have provided some protection against sporadic raiding, but were not purely defensive structure but a focal point for the clan of the area.
  • Pictures of Dun Carloway Broch on the Isle of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides, Scotland. Brochs are among Scotland's most impressive prehistoric buildings and were the precursors of the Medieval Scottish Tower Houses. The world Broch is derived from lowland scots who called forts Brough from the old Norse Borg. <br />
<br />
Broch stone roundhouses date from about 2,300 to 1,900 years ago, and are found mainly in north and west Scotland. Dun Carloway Broch was probably built around the time of the Roman occupation in Britain in 43AD and was probably the primary dwelling-places for the principal family in the area. Dun Carloway Broch would have provided some protection against sporadic raiding, but were not purely defensive structure but a focal point for the clan of the area.
  • Pictures of Dun Carloway Broch on the Isle of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides, Scotland. Brochs are among Scotland's most impressive prehistoric buildings and were the precursors of the Medieval Scottish Tower Houses. The world Broch is derived from lowland scots who called forts Brough from the old Norse Borg. <br />
<br />
Broch stone roundhouses date from about 2,300 to 1,900 years ago, and are found mainly in north and west Scotland. Dun Carloway Broch was probably built around the time of the Roman occupation in Britain in 43AD and was probably the primary dwelling-places for the principal family in the area. Dun Carloway Broch would have provided some protection against sporadic raiding, but were not purely defensive structure but a focal point for the clan of the area.
  • Pictures of Dun Carloway Broch on the Isle of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides, Scotland. Brochs are among Scotland's most impressive prehistoric buildings and were the precursors of the Medieval Scottish Tower Houses. The world Broch is derived from lowland scots who called forts Brough from the old Norse Borg. <br />
<br />
Broch stone roundhouses date from about 2,300 to 1,900 years ago, and are found mainly in north and west Scotland. Dun Carloway Broch was probably built around the time of the Roman occupation in Britain in 43AD and was probably the primary dwelling-places for the principal family in the area. Dun Carloway Broch would have provided some protection against sporadic raiding, but were not purely defensive structure but a focal point for the clan of the area.
  • Pictures of Dun Carloway Broch on the Isle of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides; Scotland. Brochs are among Scotland's most impressive prehistoric buildings and were the precursors of the Medieval Scottish Tower Houses. The world Broch is derived from lowland scots who called forts Brough from the old Norse Borg.; Broch stone roundhouses date from about 2; 300 to 1; 900 years ago; and are found mainly in north and west Scotland. Dun Carloway Broch was probably built around the time of the Roman occupation in Britain in 43AD and was probably the primary dwelling-places for the principal family in the area. Dun Carloway Broch would have provided some protection against sporadic raiding; but were not purely defensive structure but a focal point for the clan of the area.
  • Pictures of Dun Carloway Broch on the Isle of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides, Scotland. Brochs are among Scotland's most impressive prehistoric buildings and were the precursors of the Medieval Scottish Tower Houses. The world Broch is derived from lowland scots who called forts Brough from the old Norse Borg. <br />
<br />
Broch stone roundhouses date from about 2,300 to 1,900 years ago, and are found mainly in north and west Scotland. Dun Carloway Broch was probably built around the time of the Roman occupation in Britain in 43AD and was probably the primary dwelling-places for the principal family in the area. Dun Carloway Broch would have provided some protection against sporadic raiding, but were not purely defensive structure but a focal point for the clan of the area.
  • Pictures of Dun Carloway Broch on the Isle of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides; Scotland. Brochs are among Scotland's most impressive prehistoric buildings and were the precursors of the Medieval Scottish Tower Houses. The world Broch is derived from lowland scots who called forts Brough from the old Norse Borg.; Broch stone roundhouses date from about 2; 300 to 1; 900 years ago; and are found mainly in north and west Scotland. Dun Carloway Broch was probably built around the time of the Roman occupation in Britain in 43AD and was probably the primary dwelling-places for the principal family in the area. Dun Carloway Broch would have provided some protection against sporadic raiding; but were not purely defensive structure but a focal point for the clan of the area.
  • Pictures of Dun Carloway Broch on the Isle of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides, Scotland. Brochs are among Scotland's most impressive prehistoric buildings and were the precursors of the Medieval Scottish Tower Houses. The world Broch is derived from lowland scots who called forts Brough from the old Norse Borg. <br />
<br />
Broch stone roundhouses date from about 2,300 to 1,900 years ago, and are found mainly in north and west Scotland. Dun Carloway Broch was probably built around the time of the Roman occupation in Britain in 43AD and was probably the primary dwelling-places for the principal family in the area. Dun Carloway Broch would have provided some protection against sporadic raiding, but were not purely defensive structure but a focal point for the clan of the area.
  • Pictures of Dun Carloway Broch on the Isle of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides, Scotland. Brochs are among Scotland's most impressive prehistoric buildings and were the precursors of the Medieval Scottish Tower Houses. The world Broch is derived from lowland scots who called forts Brough from the old Norse Borg. <br />
<br />
Broch stone roundhouses date from about 2,300 to 1,900 years ago, and are found mainly in north and west Scotland. Dun Carloway Broch was probably built around the time of the Roman occupation in Britain in 43AD and was probably the primary dwelling-places for the principal family in the area. Dun Carloway Broch would have provided some protection against sporadic raiding, but were not purely defensive structure but a focal point for the clan of the area.
  • Pictures of Dun Carloway Broch on the Isle of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides, Scotland. Brochs are among Scotland's most impressive prehistoric buildings and were the precursors of the Medieval Scottish Tower Houses. The world Broch is derived from lowland scots who called forts Brough from the old Norse Borg. <br />
<br />
Broch stone roundhouses date from about 2,300 to 1,900 years ago, and are found mainly in north and west Scotland. Dun Carloway Broch was probably built around the time of the Roman occupation in Britain in 43AD and was probably the primary dwelling-places for the principal family in the area. Dun Carloway Broch would have provided some protection against sporadic raiding, but were not purely defensive structure but a focal point for the clan of the area.
  • Pictures of Dun Carloway Broch on the Isle of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides, Scotland. Brochs are among Scotland's most impressive prehistoric buildings and were the precursors of the Medieval Scottish Tower Houses. The world Broch is derived from lowland scots who called forts Brough from the old Norse Borg. <br />
<br />
Broch stone roundhouses date from about 2,300 to 1,900 years ago, and are found mainly in north and west Scotland. Dun Carloway Broch was probably built around the time of the Roman occupation in Britain in 43AD and was probably the primary dwelling-places for the principal family in the area. Dun Carloway Broch would have provided some protection against sporadic raiding, but were not purely defensive structure but a focal point for the clan of the area.
  • Pictures of Dun Carloway Broch on the Isle of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides, Scotland. Brochs are among Scotland's most impressive prehistoric buildings and were the precursors of the Medieval Scottish Tower Houses. The world Broch is derived from lowland scots who called forts Brough from the old Norse Borg. <br />
<br />
Broch stone roundhouses date from about 2,300 to 1,900 years ago, and are found mainly in north and west Scotland. Dun Carloway Broch was probably built around the time of the Roman occupation in Britain in 43AD and was probably the primary dwelling-places for the principal family in the area. Dun Carloway Broch would have provided some protection against sporadic raiding, but were not purely defensive structure but a focal point for the clan of the area.
  • Byzantine mosaics depicting scenes from the Bible of the building o the Tower of Babel in the Cathedral of Monreale - Palermo - Sicily Pictures, photos, images & fotos photography
  • Medieval Windows of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France, dedicated to the signs of the Zodiac and the monthly labours.  From bottom left - Wine growers, Bell ringers ( centre bottom) Count Thibault VI on his horse. Above centre is January, the Roman god of Janus  or Aquarius, above left  - February, a man keeping warm in font of a fire, right - two fish representing Pisces. Above left March - A Man pruning the vines and right Aries. Centre panel above - May / Gemini. Above left  is April and top right is Taurus. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Medieval Windows of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France, dedicated to the signs of the Zodiac and the monthly labours.  From bottom left - Wine growers, Bell ringers ( centre bottom) Count Thibault VI on his horse. Above centre is January, the Roman god of Janus  or Aquarius, above left  - February, a man keeping warm in font of a fire, right - two fish representing Pisces. Above left March - A Man pruning the vines and right Aries. Centre panel above - May / Gemini. Above left  is April and top right is Taurus. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Early Anglo Saxon sulptures of an Apostle holding a book now part of the south porch of Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire, England. The apostles, apart from Peter who holds a crude key, have no distinguishing feature to allow identification. Some are holding books, none have halos and some hold their heads at awkward angles. These three styles are typical of Anglo Saxon art. The two panels are 10 ft long and 4ft 6" high are date from the original Ango Saxon church of 705. They were probablbly built into the proch during the Norman rebuilding. The style of these sculptures is of the Roman Byzantine style and were probably sculpted by masions from Gaul.  Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire, England
  • Early Anglo Saxon sulptures of the Apostles now part of the south porch of Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire, England. The apostles, apart from Peter who holds a crude key, have no distinguishing feature to allow identification. Some are holding books, none have halos and some hold their heads at awkward angles. These three styles are typical of Anglo Saxon art. The two panels are 10 ft long and 4ft 6" high are date from the original Ango Saxon church of 705. They were probablbly built into the proch during the Norman rebuilding. The style of these sculptures is of the Roman Byzantine style and were probably sculpted by masions from Gaul.  Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire, England
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • Early Anglo Saxon sulptures of the Apostles now part of the south porch of Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire, England. The apostles, apart from Peter who holds a crude key, have no distinguishing feature to allow identification. Some are holding books, none have halos and some hold their heads at awkward angles. These three styles are typical of Anglo Saxon art. The two panels are 10 ft long and 4ft 6" high are date from the original Ango Saxon church of 705. They were probablbly built into the proch during the Norman rebuilding. The style of these sculptures is of the Roman Byzantine style and were probably sculpted by masions from Gaul.  Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire, England
  • Early Anglo Saxon sulptures of Christ and the  Apostles now part of the south porch of Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire, England. The apostles, apart from Peter who holds a crude key, have no distinguishing feature to allow identification. Some are holding books, none have halos and some hold their heads at awkward angles. These three styles are typical of Anglo Saxon art. The two panels are 10 ft long and 4ft 6" high are date from the original Ango Saxon church of 705. They were probablbly built into the proch during the Norman rebuilding. The style of these sculptures is of the Roman Byzantine style and were probably sculpted by masions from Gaul.  Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire, England
  • Early Anglo Saxon sulptures of an Apostle holding a book now part of the south porch of Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire, England. The apostles, apart from Peter who holds a crude key, have no distinguishing feature to allow identification. Some are holding books, none have halos and some hold their heads at awkward angles. These three styles are typical of Anglo Saxon art. The two panels are 10 ft long and 4ft 6" high are date from the original Ango Saxon church of 705. They were probablbly built into the proch during the Norman rebuilding. The style of these sculptures is of the Roman Byzantine style and were probably sculpted by masions from Gaul.  Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire, England
  • Early Anglo Saxon sulptures of an Apostle holding a book now part of the south porch of Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire, England. The apostles, apart from Peter who holds a crude key, have no distinguishing feature to allow identification. Some are holding books, none have halos and some hold their heads at awkward angles. These three styles are typical of Anglo Saxon art. The two panels are 10 ft long and 4ft 6" high are date from the original Ango Saxon church of 705. They were probablbly built into the proch during the Norman rebuilding. The style of these sculptures is of the Roman Byzantine style and were probably sculpted by masions from Gaul.  Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire, England
  • Early Anglo Saxon sulptures of the Apostles now part of the south porch of Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire, England. The apostles, apart from Peter who holds a crude key, have no distinguishing feature to allow identification. Some are holding books, none have halos and some hold their heads at awkward angles. These three styles are typical of Anglo Saxon art. The two panels are 10 ft long and 4ft 6" high are date from the original Ango Saxon church of 705. They were probablbly built into the proch during the Norman rebuilding. The style of these sculptures is of the Roman Byzantine style and were probably sculpted by masions from Gaul.  Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire, England
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • Early Anglo Saxon sulptures of Christ and the  Apostles now part of the south porch of Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire, England. The apostles, apart from Peter who holds a crude key, have no distinguishing feature to allow identification. Some are holding books, none have halos and some hold their heads at awkward angles. These three styles are typical of Anglo Saxon art. The two panels are 10 ft long and 4ft 6" high are date from the original Ango Saxon church of 705. They were probablbly built into the proch during the Norman rebuilding. The style of these sculptures is of the Roman Byzantine style and were probably sculpted by masions from Gaul.  Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire, England
  • Early Anglo Saxon sulptures of the Apostles now part of the south porch of Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire, England. The apostles, apart from Peter who holds a crude key, have no distinguishing feature to allow identification. Some are holding books, none have halos and some hold their heads at awkward angles. These three styles are typical of Anglo Saxon art. The two panels are 10 ft long and 4ft 6" high are date from the original Ango Saxon church of 705. They were probablbly built into the proch during the Norman rebuilding. The style of these sculptures is of the Roman Byzantine style and were probably sculpted by masions from Gaul.  Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire, England
  • Tympanum of the south door of the 12the century  church of St Peter & St Paul depicting Chirst in Majest, Pantocrator, with flying angels each side holding up the Mandorla or aureol he is sitting in. This is very typical of Eastern Roman or Byzantine art and the geometric designs suggest this is Norman art of the 12th century rebuilding  of Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire, England
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • 14th century medieval Gothic stained glass window showing scenes from the life of Saint Maurice (From Bottom Up) Saint Maurice refuses to sacrifice to false idols, Maurice is shown as the leader of the Roman Thebian Legion, The 2 emperors Diocletian and Maximian order the persecution of Christians, Maurice and his followers and executed.. The Gothic Cathedral Basilica of Saint Denis ( Basilique Saint-Denis ) Paris, France. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Tympanum of the south door of the 12the century  church of St Peter & St Paul depicting Chirst in Majest, Pantocrator, with flying angels each side holding up the Mandorla or aureol he is sitting in. This is very typical of Eastern Roman or Byzantine art and the geometric designs suggest this is Norman art of the 12th century rebuilding  of Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire, England
  • The Italian Chapel constructed of 2 nissen huts in 1942 at Italian prisoner of war Camp 60 next to Sapa Flow. The Italian inmates under the direction of their priests Father Giacobazzi and Domenico Chiocchetti decorated the interior with Trompe-l’œil stonework and murals to resemble the interior of a Roman Catholic painted church. Lamb Holm, Orkney, Scotland
  • The  Great Altar of the Upper market of Prgamon. The Altar building is reconstructed in the Pergamon Museum in Berlin. Pergamon (Bergama) Archaeological Site, Turkey
  • Trogir Harbour front with Medieval buildings - Croatia
  • Medieval stained glass Window of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France - dedicated to Noah and The Flood.Central Diamond panel - God instructs Noah to build an ark - The two panels below and the panels left and right show God instructing Noah to build an ark . Panel top left - Noah's sons; Shem, Ham and Japheth, panel top right - Noah's wife and daughters in law  .A UNESCO World Heritage Site..
  • Medieval stained glass Window of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France - dedicated to Noah and The Flood. Bottom Diamond panel - God instructs Noah to build an ark - The two panels below and the panels left and right show God instructing Noah to build an ark . Panel top left - Noah's sons; Shem, Ham and Japheth, panel top right - Noah's wife and daughters in law . Top central diamond - Noah and one of his sons constructing the Ark, top left  and right - Animals approaching the ark two by two. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Medieval stained glass Window of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France - dedicated to Noah and The Flood. Bottom Diamond panel - God instructs Noah to build an ark - The two panels below and the panels left and right show God instructing Noah to build an ark . Panel top left - Noah's sons; Shem, Ham and Japheth, panel top right - Noah's wife and daughters in law . Top central diamond - Noah and one of his sons constructing the Ark, top left  and right - Animals approaching the ark two by two. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Trogir Harbour front with Medieval buildings - Croatia
  • Trogir Harbour front with Medieval buildings - Croatia
  • Trogir Harbour front with Medieval buildings - Croatia
  • Trogir Harbour front with Medieval buildings - Croatia
  • Trogir Harbour front with Medieval buildings - Croatia
  • Medieval Window of the South Transept of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France- Circa 1225-30. A UNESCO World Heritage Site. This window was a donation of the Mauclerc family, the Counts of Dreux-Bretagne, who are depicted with their arms in the bases of the lancets above it shows one of the four evangelists sitting on the shoulders of four Prophets - a rare literal illustration of the theological principle that the New Testament builds upon the Old Testament.
  • Medieval Rose  Window of the South Transept of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France- Circa 1225-30. A UNESCO World Heritage Site. Dedicated to Christ, who is shown in the central oculus, right hand raised in benediction, surrounded by adoring angels. Two outer rings of twelve circles each contain the 24 Elders of the Apocalypse, crowned and carrying phials and musical instruments. The central lancet beneath the rose shows the Virgin carrying the infant Christ. Either side of this are four lancets showing the four evangelists sitting on the shoulders of four Prophets - a rare literal illustration of the theological principle that the New Testament builds upon the Old Testament. This window was a donation of the Mauclerc family, the Counts of Dreux-Bretagne, who are depicted with their arms in the bases of the lancets
  • Medieval Window of the South Transept of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France- Circa 1225-30. A UNESCO World Heritage Site. These windows were a donation of the Mauclerc family, the Counts of Dreux-Bretagne, who are depicted with their arms in the bases of the lancets above (centre) is the Virgin Mary & Child and on either side are the four evangelists sitting on the shoulders of four Prophets - a rare literal illustration of the theological principle that the New Testament builds upon the Old Testament.
  • Medieval Window of the South Transept of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France- Circa 1225-30. A UNESCO World Heritage Site. These windows were a donation of the Mauclerc family, the Counts of Dreux-Bretagne, who are depicted with their arms in the bases of the lancets above (right) is the Virgin Mary & Child and (left) is one of the four evangelists sitting on the shoulders of a Prophet - a rare literal illustration of the theological principle that the New Testament builds upon the Old Testament.
  • Medieval Rose  Window of the South Transept of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France- Circa 1225-30. A UNESCO World Heritage Site. Dedicated to Christ, who is shown in the central oculus, right hand raised in benediction, surrounded by adoring angels. Two outer rings of twelve circles each contain the 24 Elders of the Apocalypse, crowned and carrying phials and musical instruments. The central lancet beneath the rose shows the Virgin carrying the infant Christ. Either side of this are four lancets showing the four evangelists sitting on the shoulders of four Prophets - a rare literal illustration of the theological principle that the New Testament builds upon the Old Testament. This window was a donation of the Mauclerc family, the Counts of Dreux-Bretagne, who are depicted with their arms in the bases of the lancets
  • Medieval Rose  Window of the South Transept of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France- Circa 1225-30. A UNESCO World Heritage Site. Dedicated to Christ, who is shown in the central oculus, right hand raised in benediction, surrounded by adoring angels. Two outer rings of twelve circles each contain the 24 Elders of the Apocalypse, crowned and carrying phials and musical instruments. The central lancet beneath the rose shows the Virgin carrying the infant Christ. Either side of this are four lancets showing the four evangelists sitting on the shoulders of four Prophets - a rare literal illustration of the theological principle that the New Testament builds upon the Old Testament. This window was a donation of the Mauclerc family, the Counts of Dreux-Bretagne, who are depicted with their arms in the bases of the lancets
  • Dominican Monastery - Trogir Croatia
  • The island of San Giorgio Maggiore lying east of the Giudecca and south of the main island group, with its church front designed by Andrea Palladio and begun in 1566.  Venice Italy
  • The island of San Giorgio Maggiore lying east of the Giudecca and south of the main island group, with its church front designed by Andrea Palladio and begun in 1566.  Venice Italy
  • The island of San Giorgio Maggiore lying east of the Giudecca and south of the main island group, with its church front designed by Andrea Palladio and begun in 1566.  Venice Italy
  • The island of San Giorgio Maggiore lying east of the Giudecca and south of the main island group, with its church front designed by Andrea Palladio and begun in 1566.  Venice Italy
  • Medieval stained glass Window of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France - dedicated to the Life of St Remigius (Remy). Bottom left - Brigands attack Remigius in his hermitage, bottom right - Remigius escapes, top left - Remigius is chosen to be Archbishop of Reims, top right- Installation of Remigious as Archbishop. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Medieval stained glass Window of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France - dedicated to the life of St Margret and St Catherine.  A UNESCO World Heritage Site..
  • Medieval stained glass Window of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France - dedicated to The Infancy and Public Ministry of Christ. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Medieval stained glass Window of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France - dedicated to the Life of St Mary Magdalen. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Medieval stained glass Window of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France - dedicated to the Life of St Lubin . Central panel shows A barrel of wine being transported to the Cathedral, below left - The young Lubin working as a shepherd, below right - A monk gives Lubin a belt with the alphabet written on it, above left - Lubin receiving instruction from a cleric, above right - Lubin spends his spare time learning to read, while his companion idles.  Cental bottom semi circle - wine cryers, above left -a procession, above right - a procession of laymen and clerics.  A UNESCO World Heritage Site..
  • Medieval stained glass Window of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France - dedicated to the life of Eustace . Central panel shows act 2 ?the Tragedy and Exile? , central diamond - After various disasters, Eustace and his family abandon their home. Top Right - possibly Eustace negotiating passage to Egypt , top right - Eustace and his family board a boat to Egypt.  Bottom left from act one ?the Conversion:?- Placidus hears the words of Christ coming from the mouth of a stag, right - Placidus is baptised and given the name 'Eustace'. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Medieval Windows  of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France, dedicated to the life an miracles of St Nicholas. A UNESCO World Heritage Site. Bottom corner shows During a famine, Nicholas persuades sailors to give the town some grain, bottom left shows The sailors bringing grain ashore . Centre panel bottom, The young St Nicholas does well at school, left Nicholas secretly gives gold to an old man to save his daughters , right The old man tries to thank Nicholas, who humbly flees from him, top .Nicholas is chosen to be the new Bishop of Myra.  .
  • Medieval Windows of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France, dedicated to the life of the Virgin Mary.  The bottom centre oval panel shows Anna and Joachim meet at the Golden Gate, below The high priest refuses the offerings of Joachim, left Annunciation to Joachim , right Annunciation to Anna .  . A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Medieval stained glass Window of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France. A UNESCO World Heritage Site..
  • Medieval stained glass Window of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France. A UNESCO World Heritage Site..
  • Stained glass Windows of Cathedral of Chartres, France. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Stained glass Windows of Cathedral of Chartres, France - showing  the kings of France. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Stained glass Windows of Cathedral of Chartres, France - showing  the kings of France. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Stained glass Windows of Cathedral of Chartres, France - showing Jesus Christ and Mary. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Stained glass Windows of Cathedral of Chartres, France - showing Jesus Christ and Mary. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Medieval stained glass Windows of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Medieval stained glass Windows of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Medieval stained glass Windows of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Medieval stained glass Window of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France - dedicated to the Life of St Remigius (Remy). Left window - Life of St Remigius, centre - Life and relics of St Stephen, right - Life and miracles of St Nicholas.  A UNESCO World Heritage Site..
  • Medieval stained glass Window of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France - dedicated to The life of St Apollinarie. Stained glass panels from bottom left - possible the Healing of the blind son of the judge Thaurus, centre - Apollinaris meeting the Tribune of Ravenna, left - Apollinaris heals the Tribune's wife. Second row from bottom - left - Baptism of the Tribune of Ravenna and his household, centre - Apollinaris going into (or returning from) exile, left - Apollinaris cures the maid possessed by 'an unclean spirit', Third row - left - Apollinaris enters the house of Rufus Patricius, Duke of Ravenna, centre - Through prayer, Apollinaris restores Rufus's daughter to life, right - The Provost orders Apollinaris to sacrifice to the pagan gods. Top row - left - possibly, Apollinaris is visited by an angel In prison , centre - In response to Apollinaris's prayers, a temple of Jupiter collapses, right - The Provost and other witnesses to the destruction of the temple. A UNESCO World Heritage Site..
  • Medieval stained glass Window of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France - dedicated to St Margret and St Catherine. Bottom left panel -  Margaret of Lèves praying before statue of the Virgin & Child, bottom right - Donors of the window  Geffroy de Meslay and Guerin de Fraize. Top left panel - St Margaret vanquishing a demon, top right panel - St Margaret bursting out of the belly of a dragon . A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Medieval stained glass Window of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France - dedicated to the Life of St Remigius (Remy).  A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Medieval stained glass Window of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France - dedicated to the Passion.  A UNESCO World Heritage Site..
  • Medieval stained glass Window of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France - dedicated to the Passion.  A UNESCO World Heritage Site..
  • Medieval stained glass Window of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France - dedicated to the Passion.  A UNESCO World Heritage Site..
  • Medieval stained glass Window of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France - dedicated to the Passion.  A UNESCO World Heritage Site..
  • Medieval stained glass Window of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France - dedicated to the Passion.  A UNESCO World Heritage Site..
  • Medieval stained glass Window of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France - dedicated to the life of St Anthony of the Desert.  Bottom central diamond panel -Placidus and a companion hunting deer , Top left oval - Placidus hears the words of Christ coming from the mouth of a stag, top right oval - Placidus is baptised and given the name 'Eustace'. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Medieval stained glass Window of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France - dedicated to the life of St Anthony of the Desert.
  • Medieval stained glass Window of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France - dedicated to St Sylvester. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Medieval stained glass Window of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France - dedicated to The Infancy and Public Ministry of Christ. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Medieval stained glass Window of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France - dedicated to The Infancy and Public Ministry of Christ. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Medieval stained glass Window of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France - dedicated to The Infancy and Public Ministry of Christ. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Medieval stained glass Window of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France - dedicated to The Infancy and Public Ministry of Christ. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Medieval stained glass Window of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France - dedicated to The Tree of Jesse (12th century). A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Medieval stained glass Window of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France - dedicated to The Tree of Jesse (12th century). Botton row of panels - Nahum / Jesse with the 'stem' growing from his loins / Joel. row above - Ezekiel / David / Hosea, row above - saiah / Solomon / Micah. Top row - Moses / Generic King of Israel / Balaam. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Medieval stained glass Window of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France - dedicated to St John The Evangelist. Bottom panel - Flight into Egypt . Above left - Armourers making shields and saddles, above right - Armourers making stirrups. Central panel - Death of Satheus, above left - John's journey into exile on Patmos, above right - St John on Patmos. A UNESCO World Heritage Site..
  • Medieval stained glass Window of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France - dedicated to St John The Evangelist. Bottom panel - Flight into Egypt . Above left - Armourers making shields and saddles, above right - Armourers making stirrups. Central panel - Death of Satheus, above left - John's journey into exile on Patmos, above right - St John on Patmos. A UNESCO World Heritage Site..
  • Medieval stained glass Window of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France - dedicated to the Life of St Mary Magdalen. Central panel - bottom left - Mary meets the angel at Christ's empty tomb (the Quem quaeritis), bottom right - The Noli me tangere, top left - Mary as the Apostola Apostolorum , top right - The Apostles receiving Mary's news . Diamond below and side panels either side - Christ raising Lazarus. A UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Medieval stained glass Window of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France - dedicated to the Life of St Mary Magdalen. Bottom central panel - bottom left - Mary washing Christ's feet in the house of Simon the Pharisee, bottom right - Death of Lazarus, top left - Their neighbours try to console Mary and Martha, top right - Funeral of Lazarus. Diamond panel above and side panels either side - Christ raising Lazarus. A UNESCO World Heritage Site..
  • Medieval stained glass Window of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres, France - dedicated to the Life of St Mary Magdalen. Central panel - bottom left - Mary washing Christ's feet in the house of Simon the Pharisee, bottom right - Death of Lazarus, top left - Their neighbours try to console Mary and Martha, top right - Funeral of Lazarus.  A UNESCO World Heritage Site..

Paul Williams Photo Archive

Picture The Past

ABOUT

Paul Williams Photo Archive is a free resource for professional editorial picture editors, picture researchers, historical scholars and students and enthusiasts who want to browse some of the best photos of historic countries, images of historical places, photos of archaeological sites and the very best images of museum antiquities and artefacts exhibits in Europe and the Middle East.

Photos and Images can be downloaded or bought as stock photos or photo art prints.

COUNTRIES

Browse travel pictures and photos of historic places and archaeological sites of countries in Europe and the Middle East.

See Travel Photos....

HISTORICAL

Explore the past through photos and images of its historic places. See the great palaces, castles and cities of antiquity as well as the great archaeological sites where our ancestors made history.

See Images of Historical Places...

MUSEUMS

Browse pictures & images the treasured artefacts and antiquities exhibits from the great Museum of Europe and the Middle East. See the art and objects made by our ancestors.

See Photos of Museum Antiquities...