• Ancient Greek Cycladic female figurine of the canonical type, Dokathismata and Spedos variety, Early Cycladic period II, Syros phase, 2800-2300 BC, Museum of Cycladic Art, Athens.   Against black<br />
<br />
Considered to be an intermediate or transitional form between the Dokathismata and Spedos varieties/
  • Post canonical female ancient Greek Cycladic figurine, Late Ccladic priod  II to Cycladic period III (2500-2000 BC)Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, cat no 312,  Against white.
  • Post canonical female ancient Greek Cycladic figurine, Late Ccladic priod II to Cycladic period III (2500-2000 BC)Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, cat no 312.  Grey Background.
  • Post canonical female ancient Greek Cycladic figurine, Late Ccladic priod II to Cycladic period III (2500-2000 BC)Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, cat no 312
  • Marble ancient Greek Cycladic figurine wearing a conical pilos, early Plastiras type, Early Cycladic Period I, circal 2800 BC, Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, cat no 1111.  Against white.
  • Marble ancient Greek Cycladic figurine wearing a conical pilos, early Plastiras type, Early Cycladic Period I, circal 2800 BC, Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, cat no 1111.   Against black
  • Marble ancient Greek Cycladic figurine wearing a conical pilos, early Plastiras type, Early Cycladic Period I, circal 2800 BC, Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, cat no 1111
  • Marble ancient Greek Cycladic figurine wearing a conical pilos, early Plastiras type, Early Cycladic Period I, circal 2800 BC, Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, cat no 1111.  Against Grey Background.
  • Post canonical ancient Greek Cycladic warrior or hunter figurine, Late Ccladic prioc II to Cycladic period II (2500-2000 BC)Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, cat no 308. Against white.<br />
<br />
The relif of a baldric crossing the body left to righ suggest the figure was of a warrior or hunter. A small triangular dagger is incised as if hanging from the baldric.
  • Post canonical ancient Greek Cycladic warrior or hunter figurine, Late Ccladic prioc II to Cycladic period II (2500-2000 BC)Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, cat no 308.  Against black<br />
<br />
The relif of a baldric crossing the body left to righ suggest the figure was of a warrior or hunter. A small triangular dagger is incised as if hanging from the baldric.
  • Post canonical ancient Greek Cycladic warrior or hunter figurine, Late Ccladic prioc II to Cycladic period II (2500-2000 BC)Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, cat no 308. Against Grey Background. <br />
<br />
The relif of a baldric crossing the body left to righ suggest the figure was of a warrior or hunter. A small triangular dagger is incised as if hanging from the baldric.
  • Post canonical ancient Greek Cycladic warrior or hunter figurine, Late Ccladic prioc II to Cycladic period II (2500-2000 BC)Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, cat no 308. Against Grey Background. <br />
<br />
The relif of a baldric crossing the body left to righ suggest the figure was of a warrior or hunter. A small triangular dagger is incised as if hanging from the baldric.
  • Sarcophagus of The Mourning Women, 4th cent. B.C Greek from the Royal Necropolis of Sidon , Chamber no I, Lebanon, Istanbul Archaeological Museum Inv. 386T  Cat. Mendel 10.
  • Sarcophagus of The Mourning Women, 4th cent. B.C Greek from the Royal Necropolis of Sidon , Chamber no I, Lebanon, Istanbul Archaeological Museum Inv. 386T  Cat. Mendel 10.
  • Sarcophagus of The Mourning Women, 4th cent. B.C Greek from the Royal Necropolis of Sidon , Chamber no I, Lebanon, Istanbul Archaeological Museum Inv. 386T  Cat. Mendel 10.
  • Sarcophagus of The Mourning Women, 4th cent. B.C Greek from the Royal Necropolis of Sidon , Chamber no I, Lebanon, Istanbul Archaeological Museum Inv. 386T  Cat. Mendel 10.
  • Sarcophagus of The Mourning Women, 4th cent. B.C Greek from the Royal Necropolis of Sidon , Chamber no I, Lebanon, Istanbul Archaeological Museum Inv. 386T  Cat. Mendel 10.
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Rare original Greek bronze statue of an Athlete after a boxing match, a 1st cent BC. The athlete, seated on a boulder, is resting after a boxing match. The boulder is a modern addition that replicates the ancient original. The face, ears, and nose are severely wounded by blows received during the match. No wounds appear on the body since ancient boxing practices made the afce the main target. The boxer is only wearing a sort of loin cloth (kynodesme) around his waist. Elaborate leather gloves (himantes oxeis) protect the hands and the forearms. They consist of thick leather straps that bind the four fingers, leaving the thumb free. On the forearms the gloves are bordered with fur lining. A series of marks on the straps above the left ring fingers seem to be a signature of the Athenian sculptor Appolonios, son of Nestor who was active during the 1st century B.C. Careful analysis shows that the marks are actually corrosions of the bronze surface. The Greek letter ‘a’ is impressed on the middle toe of the left foot and is probably a mark identifying the workshop that produced the statue. The statue of the boxer is of the highest quality with a highly detailed rendition of the athletic anatomy and facial feature. The artist was clearly inspired by the style of Greek sculptor Lysippus and scholars generally consider it an original Greek bronze of the 1st Century B.C. . The National Roman Museum, Rome, Italy
  • Ancient Greek Cycladic female figurine of the canonical type, Dokathismata variety, Early Cycladic period II, Syros phase, 2800-2300 BC, Museum of Cycladic Art, Athens. Against white.<br />
<br />
Attributed to the 'Ashmolean Museum Master'
  • Ancient Greek Cycladic female figurine of the canonical type, Dokathismata variety, Early Cycladic period II, Syros phase, 2800-2300 BC, Museum of Cycladic Art, Athens. Grey Background. <br />
<br />
Attributed to the 'Ashmolean Museum Master'
  • Ancient Greek Cycladic female figurine of the canonical type, Dokathismata variety, Early Cycladic period II, Syros phase, 2800-2300 BC, Museum of Cycladic Art, Athens.<br />
<br />
Attributed to the 'Ashmolean Museum Master'
  • Ancient Greek Cycladic female figurine of the canonical type, Dokathismata variety, Early Cycladic period II, Syros phase, 2800-2300 BC, Museum of Cycladic Art, Athens.  Against black<br />
<br />
Attributed to the 'Ashmolean Museum Master'
  • Ancient Greek Cycladic female figurine of the canonical type, Dokathismata variety, Early Cycladic period II, Syros phase, 2800-2300 BC, Museum of Cycladic Art, Athens. Grey Background. <br />
<br />
Attributed to the 'Ashmolean Museum Master'
  • Ancient Greek Cycladic figurine, Kilia type ('stargazer'). Kilia, Gallipoli, Turkey, Circa 4360-3500 BC. Museum of Cycladic Art Athens,  Against white.
  • Ancient Greek Cycladic figurine, Kilia type ('stargazer'). Kilia, Gallipoli, Turkey, Circa 4360-3500 BC. Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, Grey Background.
  • Ancient Greek Cycladic figurine, Kilia type ('stargazer'). Kilia, Gallipoli, Turkey, Circa 4360-3500 BC. Museum of Cycladic Art Athens,   Against black
  • Ancient Greek Cycladic figurine, Kilia type ('stargazer'). Kilia, Gallipoli, Turkey, Circa 4360-3500 BC. Museum of Cycladic Art Athens,
  • Ancient Greek Cycladic figurine, Kilia type ('stargazer'). Kilia, Gallipoli, Turkey, Circa 4360-3500 BC. Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, Grey Background.
  • Ancient violin shaped schematic figure from the Pelos phase,  'Kusura type', probably from Asia Minor. Early Cycladic period I 3200-2800 BC. Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, Cat no 961.  Against white.
  • Ancient violin shaped schematic figure from the Pelos phase,  'Kusura type', probably from Asia Minor. Early Cycladic period I 3200-2800 BC. Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, Cat no 961.   Against black
  • Ancient spade shaped schematic figure from the Pelos phase,   probably from Asia Minor. Early Cycladic period I 3200-2800 BC. Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, Cat no 333.  Against white.
  • Ancient spade shaped schematic figure from the Pelos phase,   probably from Asia Minor. Early Cycladic period I 3200-2800 BC. Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, Cat no 333. Grey Background.
  • Ancient spade shaped schematic figure from the Pelos phase,   probably from Asia Minor. Early Cycladic period I 3200-2800 BC. Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, Cat no 333
  • Ancient spade shaped schematic figure from the Pelos phase,   probably from Asia Minor. Early Cycladic period I 3200-2800 BC. Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, Cat no 333
  • Statue of Thetsis - a 2nd century AD Roman statue found in the city of Lavinia, Italy. Thetis (/ˈθɛtɪs/; Ancient Greek: Θέτις, [tʰétis]), is encountered in Greek mythology mostly as a sea nymph or known as the goddess of water, one of the fifty Nereids, daughters of the ancient sea god Nereus. he statue belonged to a set of ten divinities formerly presented in the portico hemicycle of the city. The Albani Collection Inv No. LL 19 (Usual No Ma 2244), Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Ancient violin shaped schematic figure from the Pelos phase,  'Kusura type', probably from Asia Minor. Early Cycladic period I 3200-2800 BC. Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, Cat no 961. Grey Background.
  • Ancient violin shaped schematic figure from the Pelos phase,  'Kusura type', probably from Asia Minor. Early Cycladic period I 3200-2800 BC. Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, Cat no 961
  • Ancient violin shaped schematic figure from the Pelos phase,  'Kusura type', probably from Asia Minor. Early Cycladic period I 3200-2800 BC. Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, Cat no 961. Grey Background.
  • Ancient spade shaped schematic figure from the Pelos phase,   probably from Asia Minor. Early Cycladic period I 3200-2800 BC. Museum of Cycladic Art Athens, Cat no 333. Grey Background.
  • Minoan wall art depicting 'Blue Monkeys' from Knossos Palace, 1700-1450 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.
  • The Minoan 'Dolphin Fresco' wall art from the Queen's Megaron, Knossos Palace, 1600-1450 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.<br />
<br />
Two dolphins are depicted swimming amongst small fish .
  • Minoan Bull wall art fresco , West Bastion, Knossos Palace, 1600-1450 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.<br />
<br />
The Minoan Bull fresco was part of a larger composition which probably had a hunter or bull leaper in it. It is a masterpiece of Minoan naturalism and a work of high quality and expresive power.
  • Minoan 'Prince of the Lilies' wall art freco, Knossos Palace, 1600-1450 BCHeraklion Archaeological Museum.<br />
<br />
An emblematic image of Minoan Crete this fresco was part of a larger composition in high relief. The fresco depicts a life size figure wearing a coloured kilt with a cod piece and a belt. A majestic crown on his head is adorned with papyrus lilies and peacock feathers. Neopalatial Period.
  • Minoan wall art fresco depicting a female figure, Neopalatial Period, C.1450 BC. Pseira, Crete. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.
  • Minoan floral wall art fresco from Knossos Palace, 1600-1300 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  Grey Background.
  • Minoan wall art fresco depicting a female figure, Neopalatial Period, C.1450 BC. Pseira, Crete. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.
  • The Minoan 'Blue Boy' or 'Saffron Gatherer' wall art fresco from Knossos Palace, 1600-1300 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  Grey Background.
  • Minoan wall art fresco from the Throne Room of Knossos, 1450-1300 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  Grey Background. <br />
<br />
This Minoan fresco depicts griffins and palm trees
  • Minoan wall art freco depicting a procession leading a goat from Agia Triada (Hagia Triada) Crete. 1450-1300 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  Grey Background. <br />
<br />
This minoan fresco found at the minoan settlement of Hagia Triada, depicts a sacrifical procession leading animals to be sacrificed.
  • The Minoan 'Partridge Fresco', wall art from the  'Guset House' Knossos Palace, 1600-140 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum. Black Background. <br />
<br />
This Minoan fresco was painted in vivid colours using fine brush strokes and colour gradients. It portrays partridges , commonly found in Crete, among rocks and thopical Cretian flora. It decorated the pavillion in the so called 'Guset House' or 'Caravanserai.
  • The Minoan 'Tripartite Shrine' or ;Grandstand Fresco', wall art from  Knossos Palace, 1600-1450 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  Grey Background. <br />
<br />
The Minoan fresco depicts females seated on a raised platform and a large crowd in what is thought to be the Central Court of Knossos Palace. .
  • Minoan wall art fresco of a 'figure of eight' shield from Knossos Palace, 1450-1300 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.<br />
<br />
<br />
The Final Palatial Period Minoan fresco is from the Grand Staircase of the Palace of Knossos and is a Trompe-l'œil  of minoan warriors shields covered with ox hide.
  • Minoan wall art fresco of 'Ladies in Blue' from Knossos Palace 1600-1450 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.<br />
<br />
The 'Ladies in Blue' Minoan fresco depicts richy dressed female figures with opulent jewelery and clothing with flamboyant hairstyles refecting the wealth of the Palace of Knossos
  • Minoan high relief wall art fresco of Griffins, Gret East Hall, Knossos. 1600-1450 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.<br />
<br />
This minoan high relief fresco decorated the Great East Hall of Knossos palace. The decoration of the hall included religious scenes depicting boxing, and bull leaping games.
  • Minoan Bull wall art fresco , West Bastion, Knossos Palace, 1600-1450 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.<br />
<br />
The Minoan Bull fresco was part of a larger composition which probably had a hunter or bull leaper in it. It is a masterpiece of Minoan naturalism and a work of high quality and expresive power.
  • Minoan 'Prince of the Lilies' wall art freco, Knossos Palace, 1600-1450 BCHeraklion Archaeological Museum.<br />
<br />
An emblematic image of Minoan Crete this fresco was part of a larger composition in high relief. The fresco depicts a life size figure wearing a coloured kilt with a cod piece and a belt. A majestic crown on his head is adorned with papyrus lilies and peacock feathers. Neopalatial Period.
  • The Minoan 'Cup Bearer' from the 'Procession Fresco', wall art from the South Prpylaeum, Knossos Palace, 1500-1400 BC . Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  Grey Background. <br />
<br />
The 'Cup Bearer' depicts a youth with long black hair, a naked torso and a richly decorated kilt carrying a large silver rhuyhon ceremonial vessel. This large Minoan fresco of many figure in procession would have decorated the corridor between the West Porch and the South Propylaeum of Knossos Palace. Both sides of the corridor were painted with hundreds of male and femal;e figures carrying precious utensils and vessels, probably depicting gift bearers to the ruler of the Palace. The composition is much like those found in the Palaces and tombs of Egypt and the near east at the time. Neopalatial final period.
  • Minoan wall art fresco depicting a female figure, Neopalatial Period, C.1450 BC. Pseira, Crete. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.
  • The Minoan 'Procession Fresco', wall art from the South Prpylaeum, Knossos Palace, 1500-1400 BC . Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  Grey Background. <br />
<br />
This latrge Minoan fresco of many figure in procession would have decorated the corridor between the West Porch and the South Propylaeum of Knossos Palace. Both sides of the corridor were painted with hundreds of male and femal;e figures carrying precious utensils and vessels, probably depicting gift bearers to the ruler of the Palace. The composition is much like those found in the Palaces and tombs of Egypt and the near east at the time. Neopalatial final period.
  • The Minoan 'Blue Boy' or 'Saffron Gatherer' wall art fresco from Knossos Palace, 1600-1300 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  Grey Background.
  • The Minoan 'Dolphin Fresco' wall art from the Queen's Megaron, Knossos Palace, 1600-1450 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  Grey Background. <br />
<br />
Two dolphins are depicted swimming amongst small fish .
  • Minoan wall art freco depicting a procession leading a goat from Agia Triada (Hagia Triada) Crete. 1450-1300 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  Grey Background. <br />
<br />
This minoan fresco found at the minoan settlement of Hagia Triada, depicts a sacrifical procession leading animals to be sacrificed.
  • The Minoan 'Procession Fresco', wall art from the South Prpylaeum, Knossos Palace, 1500-1400 BC . Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  Grey Background. <br />
<br />
This latrge Minoan fresco of many figure in procession would have decorated the corridor between the West Porch and the South Propylaeum of Knossos Palace. Both sides of the corridor were painted with hundreds of male and femal;e figures carrying precious utensils and vessels, probably depicting gift bearers to the ruler of the Palace. The composition is much like those found in the Palaces and tombs of Egypt and the near east at the time. Neopalatial final period.
  • The Minoan 'Partridge Fresco', wall art from the  'Guset House' Knossos Palace, 1600-140 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  White Background. <br />
<br />
This Minoan fresco was painted in vivid colours using fine brush strokes and colour gradients. It portrays partridges , commonly found in Crete, among rocks and thopical Cretian flora. It decorated the pavillion in the so called 'Guset House' or 'Caravanserai.
  • The Minoan 'Procession Fresco', wall art from the South Prpylaeum, Knossos Palace, 1500-1400 BC . Heraklion Archaeological Museum.<br />
<br />
This latrge Minoan fresco of many figure in procession would have decorated the corridor between the West Porch and the South Propylaeum of Knossos Palace. Both sides of the corridor were painted with hundreds of male and femal;e figures carrying precious utensils and vessels, probably depicting gift bearers to the ruler of the Palace. The composition is much like those found in the Palaces and tombs of Egypt and the near east at the time. Neopalatial final period.
  • The Minoan 'Procession Fresco', wall art from the South Prpylaeum, Knossos Palace, 1500-1400 BC . Heraklion Archaeological Museum.<br />
<br />
This latrge Minoan fresco of many figure in procession would have decorated the corridor between the West Porch and the South Propylaeum of Knossos Palace. Both sides of the corridor were painted with hundreds of male and femal;e figures carrying precious utensils and vessels, probably depicting gift bearers to the ruler of the Palace. The composition is much like those found in the Palaces and tombs of Egypt and the near east at the time. Neopalatial final period.
  • The Minoan 'Blue Boy' or 'Saffron Gatherer' wall art fresco from Knossos Palace, 1600-1300 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.
  • Minoan floral wall art fresco from Knossos Palace, 1600-1300 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum. Black Background.
  • Minoan wall art fresco depicting a female figure, Neopalatial Period, C.1450 BC. Pseira, Crete. Heraklion Archaeological Museum. Black Background.
  • Minoan wall art fresco of 'Ladies in Blue' from Knossos Palace 1600-1450 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  Grey Background. <br />
<br />
The 'Ladies in Blue' Minoan fresco depicts richy dressed female figures with opulent jewelery and clothing with flamboyant hairstyles refecting the wealth of the Palace of Knossos
  • Minoan wall art fresco of 'Ladies in Blue' from Knossos Palace 1600-1450 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.<br />
<br />
The 'Ladies in Blue' Minoan fresco depicts richy dressed female figures with opulent jewelery and clothing with flamboyant hairstyles refecting the wealth of the Palace of Knossos
  • Minoan 'Prince of the Lilies' wall art freco, Knossos Palace, 1600-1450 BCHeraklion Archaeological Museum.<br />
<br />
An emblematic image of Minoan Crete this fresco was part of a larger composition in high relief. The fresco depicts a life size figure wearing a coloured kilt with a cod piece and a belt. A majestic crown on his head is adorned with papyrus lilies and peacock feathers. Neopalatial Period.
  • Minoan wall art fresco depicting a female figure, Neopalatial Period, C.1450 BC. Pseira, Crete. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.
  • Minoan floral wall art fresco from Knossos Palace, 1600-1300 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  Grey Background.
  • Minoan Bull wall art fresco , West Bastion, Knossos Palace, 1600-1450 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  Grey Background. <br />
<br />
The Minoan Bull fresco was part of a larger composition which probably had a hunter or bull leaper in it. It is a masterpiece of Minoan naturalism and a work of high quality and expresive power.
  • The Minoan 'Procession Fresco', wall art from the South Prpylaeum, Knossos Palace, 1500-1400 BC . Heraklion Archaeological Museum. Black Background. <br />
<br />
This latrge Minoan fresco of many figure in procession would have decorated the corridor between the West Porch and the South Propylaeum of Knossos Palace. Both sides of the corridor were painted with hundreds of male and femal;e figures carrying precious utensils and vessels, probably depicting gift bearers to the ruler of the Palace. The composition is much like those found in the Palaces and tombs of Egypt and the near east at the time. Neopalatial final period.
  • The Minoan 'Dolphin Fresco' wall art from the Queen's Megaron, Knossos Palace, 1600-1450 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum. Black Background. <br />
<br />
Two dolphins are depicted swimming amongst small fish .
  • The Minoan ' Camp Stool' wall art fresco from the West vwing of Knossos Palace, 1450-1300 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum. Black Background. <br />
<br />
This Minoan fresco probably depicted a typical banquet at Knossos Palace held in the Upper Hall of the West Wing. Figures seated on 'camp stools' are raising cups and kylikes. A female figure with Mediterranean features wearing vivid make up named ' La Parisienne' by Arthur Evans, has a large 'sacred knot' bunched behind her head and maybe she was a priestess.
  • Minoan wall art freco depicting a procession leading a goat from Agia Triada (Hagia Triada) Crete. 1450-1300 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum. Black Background. <br />
<br />
This minoan fresco found at the minoan settlement of Hagia Triada, depicts a sacrifical procession leading animals to be sacrificed.
  • The Minoan 'Tripartite Shrine' or ;Grandstand Fresco', wall art from  Knossos Palace, 1600-1450 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  Grey Background. <br />
<br />
The Minoan fresco depicts females seated on a raised platform and a large crowd in what is thought to be the Central Court of Knossos Palace. .
  • Minoan wall art fresco of a 'figure of eight' shield from Knossos Palace, 1450-1300 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  Grey Background. <br />
<br />
<br />
The Final Palatial Period Minoan fresco is from the Grand Staircase of the Palace of Knossos and is a Trompe-l'œil  of minoan warriors shields covered with ox hide.
  • The Minoan 'Procession Fresco', wall art from the South Prpylaeum, Knossos Palace, 1500-1400 BC . Heraklion Archaeological Museum.<br />
<br />
This latrge Minoan fresco of many figure in procession would have decorated the corridor between the West Porch and the South Propylaeum of Knossos Palace. Both sides of the corridor were painted with hundreds of male and femal;e figures carrying precious utensils and vessels, probably depicting gift bearers to the ruler of the Palace. The composition is much like those found in the Palaces and tombs of Egypt and the near east at the time. Neopalatial final period.
  • The Minoan 'Procession Fresco', wall art from the South Prpylaeum, Knossos Palace, 1500-1400 BC . Heraklion Archaeological Museum.<br />
<br />
This latrge Minoan fresco of many figure in procession would have decorated the corridor between the West Porch and the South Propylaeum of Knossos Palace. Both sides of the corridor were painted with hundreds of male and femal;e figures carrying precious utensils and vessels, probably depicting gift bearers to the ruler of the Palace. The composition is much like those found in the Palaces and tombs of Egypt and the near east at the time. Neopalatial final period.
  • The Minoan 'Procession Fresco', wall art from the South Prpylaeum, Knossos Palace, 1500-1400 BC . Heraklion Archaeological Museum.<br />
<br />
This latrge Minoan fresco of many figure in procession would have decorated the corridor between the West Porch and the South Propylaeum of Knossos Palace. Both sides of the corridor were painted with hundreds of male and femal;e figures carrying precious utensils and vessels, probably depicting gift bearers to the ruler of the Palace. The composition is much like those found in the Palaces and tombs of Egypt and the near east at the time. Neopalatial final period.
  • Minoan 'Prince of the Lilies' wall art freco, Knossos Palace, 1600-1450 BCHeraklion Archaeological Museum.  White Background. <br />
<br />
An emblematic image of Minoan Crete this fresco was part of a larger composition in high relief. The fresco depicts a life size figure wearing a coloured kilt with a cod piece and a belt. A majestic crown on his head is adorned with papyrus lilies and peacock feathers. Neopalatial Period.
  • Minoan 'Prince of the Lilies' wall art freco, Knossos Palace, 1600-1450 BCHeraklion Archaeological Museum. Black Background. <br />
<br />
An emblematic image of Minoan Crete this fresco was part of a larger composition in high relief. The fresco depicts a life size figure wearing a coloured kilt with a cod piece and a belt. A majestic crown on his head is adorned with papyrus lilies and peacock feathers. Neopalatial Period.
  • The Minoan 'Blue Boy' or 'Saffron Gatherer' wall art fresco from Knossos Palace, 1600-1300 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.
  • The Minoan ' Camp Stool' wall art fresco from the West vwing of Knossos Palace, 1450-1300 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.<br />
<br />
This Minoan fresco probably depicted a typical banquet at Knossos Palace held in the Upper Hall of the West Wing. Figures seated on 'camp stools' are raising cups and kylikes. A female figure with Mediterranean features wearing vivid make up named ' La Parisienne' by Arthur Evans, has a large 'sacred knot' bunched behind her head and maybe she was a priestess.
  • Minoan wall art fresco of a 'figure of eight' shield from Knossos Palace, 1450-1300 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.<br />
<br />
<br />
The Final Palatial Period Minoan fresco is from the Grand Staircase of the Palace of Knossos and is a Trompe-l'œil  of minoan warriors shields covered with ox hide.
  • Minoan wall art fresco of a 'figure of eight' shield from Knossos Palace, 1450-1300 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  Grey Background. <br />
<br />
<br />
The Final Palatial Period Minoan fresco is from the Grand Staircase of the Palace of Knossos and is a Trompe-l'œil  of minoan warriors shields covered with ox hide.
  • Minoan wall art fresco of a 'figure of eight' shield from Knossos Palace, 1450-1300 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  Grey Background. <br />
<br />
<br />
The Final Palatial Period Minoan fresco is from the Grand Staircase of the Palace of Knossos and is a Trompe-l'œil  of minoan warriors shields covered with ox hide.
  • Minoan wall art fresco of a 'figure of eight' shield from Knossos Palace, 1450-1300 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.<br />
<br />
<br />
The Final Palatial Period Minoan fresco is from the Grand Staircase of the Palace of Knossos and is a Trompe-l'œil  of minoan warriors shields covered with ox hide.
  • Minoan 'Blue Monkey' wall art fresco from the 'House of Frescoes' Knossos Palace, 1600-1500 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.
  • The Minoan 'Procession Fresco', wall art from the South Prpylaeum, Knossos Palace, 1500-1400 BC . Heraklion Archaeological Museum.<br />
<br />
This latrge Minoan fresco of many figure in procession would have decorated the corridor between the West Porch and the South Propylaeum of Knossos Palace. Both sides of the corridor were painted with hundreds of male and femal;e figures carrying precious utensils and vessels, probably depicting gift bearers to the ruler of the Palace. The composition is much like those found in the Palaces and tombs of Egypt and the near east at the time. Neopalatial final period.
  • Minoan high relief wall art fresco of Griffins, Gret East Hall, Knossos. 1600-1450 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.<br />
<br />
This minoan high relief fresco decorated the Great East Hall of Knossos palace. The decoration of the hall included religious scenes depicting boxing, and bull leaping games.
  • Minoan fresco panel from the 'Lily Frescoes' from the 'Villa of the Lilies' Amnisos, 1600-1500 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.<br />
<br />
Ths freco depicts white lilies against a red background and red lilies against w white backgoround with long stems in front of a fence. The wall art uses fresco and 'in cavo' technique. Neopalatial Period.
  • Minoan fresco panel from the 'Lily Frescoes' from the 'Villa of the Lilies' Amnisos, 1600-1500 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  Grey Background. <br />
<br />
Ths freco depicts white lilies against a red background and red lilies against w white backgoround with long stems in front of a fence. The wall art uses fresco and 'in cavo' technique. Neopalatial Period.
  • The Minoan 'Cup Bearer' from the 'Procession Fresco', wall art from the South Prpylaeum, Knossos Palace, 1500-1400 BC . Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  Grey Background. <br />
<br />
The 'Cup Bearer' depicts a youth with long black hair, a naked torso and a richly decorated kilt carrying a large silver rhuyhon ceremonial vessel. This large Minoan fresco of many figure in procession would have decorated the corridor between the West Porch and the South Propylaeum of Knossos Palace. Both sides of the corridor were painted with hundreds of male and femal;e figures carrying precious utensils and vessels, probably depicting gift bearers to the ruler of the Palace. The composition is much like those found in the Palaces and tombs of Egypt and the near east at the time. Neopalatial final period.
  • Minoan floral wall art fresco from Knossos Palace, 1600-1300 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  Grey Background.
  • Minoan Bull wall art fresco , West Bastion, Knossos Palace, 1600-1450 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  Grey Background. <br />
<br />
The Minoan Bull fresco was part of a larger composition which probably had a hunter or bull leaper in it. It is a masterpiece of Minoan naturalism and a work of high quality and expresive power.
  • Minoan 'Prince of the Lilies' wall art freco, Knossos Palace, 1600-1450 BCHeraklion Archaeological Museum.  Grey Background. <br />
<br />
An emblematic image of Minoan Crete this fresco was part of a larger composition in high relief. The fresco depicts a life size figure wearing a coloured kilt with a cod piece and a belt. A majestic crown on his head is adorned with papyrus lilies and peacock feathers. Neopalatial Period.
  • Minoan 'Blue Monkey' wall art fresco from the 'House of Frescoes' Knossos Palace, 1600-1500 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  Grey Background.
  • Minoan 'Papyrus wall art fresco from the 'House of Frescoes' Knossos Palace, 1600-1500 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  Grey Background.
  • The Minoan 'Procession Fresco', wall art from the South Prpylaeum, Knossos Palace, 1500-1400 BC . Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  Grey Background. <br />
<br />
This latrge Minoan fresco of many figure in procession would have decorated the corridor between the West Porch and the South Propylaeum of Knossos Palace. Both sides of the corridor were painted with hundreds of male and femal;e figures carrying precious utensils and vessels, probably depicting gift bearers to the ruler of the Palace. The composition is much like those found in the Palaces and tombs of Egypt and the near east at the time. Neopalatial final period.
  • The Minoan 'Dolphin Fresco' wall art from the Queen's Megaron, Knossos Palace, 1600-1450 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  Grey Background. <br />
<br />
Two dolphins are depicted swimming amongst small fish .
  • Close up of The Minoan ' Camp Stool' wall art fresco from the West vwing of Knossos Palace, 1450-1300 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.<br />
<br />
This Minoan fresco probably depicted a typical banquet at Knossos Palace held in the Upper Hall of the West Wing. Figures seated on 'camp stools' are raising cups and kylikes. A female figure with Mediterranean features wearing vivid make up named ' La Parisienne' by Arthur Evans, has a large 'sacred knot' bunched behind her head and maybe she was a priestess.
  • The Minoan ' Camp Stool' wall art fresco from the West vwing of Knossos Palace, 1450-1300 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  Grey Background. <br />
<br />
This Minoan fresco probably depicted a typical banquet at Knossos Palace held in the Upper Hall of the West Wing. Figures seated on 'camp stools' are raising cups and kylikes. A female figure with Mediterranean features wearing vivid make up named ' La Parisienne' by Arthur Evans, has a large 'sacred knot' bunched behind her head and maybe she was a priestess.
  • Minoan high relief wall art fresco of Griffins, Gret East Hall, Knossos. 1600-1450 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  Grey Background. <br />
<br />
This minoan high relief fresco decorated the Great East Hall of Knossos palace. The decoration of the hall included religious scenes depicting boxing, and bull leaping games.
  • The Minoan 'Procession Fresco', wall art from the South Prpylaeum, Knossos Palace, 1500-1400 BC . Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  Grey Background. <br />
<br />
This latrge Minoan fresco of many figure in procession would have decorated the corridor between the West Porch and the South Propylaeum of Knossos Palace. Both sides of the corridor were painted with hundreds of male and femal;e figures carrying precious utensils and vessels, probably depicting gift bearers to the ruler of the Palace. The composition is much like those found in the Palaces and tombs of Egypt and the near east at the time. Neopalatial final period.
  • Minoan wall art depicting 'Blue Monkeys' from Knossos Palace, 1700-1450 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  Grey Background.
  • The Minoan 'Partridge Fresco', wall art from the  'Guset House' Knossos Palace, 1600-140 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  Grey Background. <br />
<br />
This Minoan fresco was painted in vivid colours using fine brush strokes and colour gradients. It portrays partridges , commonly found in Crete, among rocks and thopical Cretian flora. It decorated the pavillion in the so called 'Guset House' or 'Caravanserai.
  • Minoan 'Sacred Grove and Dance Freco', wall art from Knossos Palace, 1600-1450 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.   Grey Background. <br />
<br />
This Neopalatial period Minoan fredco comes from thecauseway of the west facade of the palace complex.
  • Minoan wall art depicting 'Blue Monkeys' from Knossos Palace, 1700-1450 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.
  • Minoan 'Papyrus wall art fresco from the 'House of Frescoes' Knossos Palace, 1600-1500 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.
  • Minoan wall art fresco of a 'figure of eight' shield from Knossos Palace, 1450-1300 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.<br />
<br />
<br />
The Final Palatial Period Minoan fresco is from the Grand Staircase of the Palace of Knossos and is a Trompe-l'œil  of minoan warriors shields covered with ox hide.
  • Minoan 'Blue Monkey' wall art fresco from the 'House of Frescoes' Knossos Palace, 1600-1500 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.
  • The Minoan 'Dolphin Fresco' wall art from the Queen's Megaron, Knossos Palace, 1600-1450 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.<br />
<br />
Two dolphins are depicted swimming amongst small fish .
  • Minoan wall art fresco depicting a female figure, Neopalatial Period, C.1450 BC. Pseira, Crete. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.
  • Minoan fresco panel from the 'Lily Frescoes' from the 'Villa of the Lilies' Amnisos, 1600-1500 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.<br />
<br />
Ths freco depicts white lilies against a red background and red lilies against w white backgoround with long stems in front of a fence. The wall art uses fresco and 'in cavo' technique. Neopalatial Period.
  • Minoan floral wall art fresco from Knossos Palace, 1600-1300 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.
  • Minoan floral wall art fresco from Knossos Palace, 1600-1300 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.
  • Minoan Bull wall art fresco , West Bastion, Knossos Palace, 1600-1450 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.<br />
<br />
The Minoan Bull fresco was part of a larger composition which probably had a hunter or bull leaper in it. It is a masterpiece of Minoan naturalism and a work of high quality and expresive power.
  • Minoan wall art fresco depicting a female figure, Neopalatial Period, C.1450 BC. Pseira, Crete. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.
  • Minoan 'Prince of the Lilies' wall art freco, Knossos Palace, 1600-1450 BCHeraklion Archaeological Museum.<br />
<br />
An emblematic image of Minoan Crete this fresco was part of a larger composition in high relief. The fresco depicts a life size figure wearing a coloured kilt with a cod piece and a belt. A majestic crown on his head is adorned with papyrus lilies and peacock feathers. Neopalatial Period.
  • Minoan 'Papyrus wall art fresco from the 'House of Frescoes' Knossos Palace, 1600-1500 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  Grey Background.
  • The Minoan 'Saffron Gatherer' wall art fresco, from 'House of Frescoes' Knossos Palace. 1700-1450 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  Grey Background. <br />
<br />
The 'Saffron Gatherers' fresco depicts a blue monket gatering saffron crocuses and placing them in a basket. The saffron is thought to have been a gift to the 'Great Goddess'. One of the earliest frescoes from Knossos.
  • Close up of The Minoan ' Camp Stool' wall art fresco from the West vwing of Knossos Palace, 1450-1300 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.<br />
<br />
This Minoan fresco probably depicted a typical banquet at Knossos Palace held in the Upper Hall of the West Wing. Figures seated on 'camp stools' are raising cups and kylikes. A female figure with Mediterranean features wearing vivid make up named ' La Parisienne' by Arthur Evans, has a large 'sacred knot' bunched behind her head and maybe she was a priestess.
  • The Minoan ' Camp Stool' wall art fresco from the West vwing of Knossos Palace, 1450-1300 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  Grey Background. <br />
<br />
This Minoan fresco probably depicted a typical banquet at Knossos Palace held in the Upper Hall of the West Wing. Figures seated on 'camp stools' are raising cups and kylikes. A female figure with Mediterranean features wearing vivid make up named ' La Parisienne' by Arthur Evans, has a large 'sacred knot' bunched behind her head and maybe she was a priestess.
  • Minoan wall art depicting 'Blue Monkeys' from Knossos Palace, 1700-1450 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.
  • The Minoan 'Partridge Fresco', wall art from the  'Guset House' Knossos Palace, 1600-140 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  Grey Background. <br />
<br />
This Minoan fresco was painted in vivid colours using fine brush strokes and colour gradients. It portrays partridges , commonly found in Crete, among rocks and thopical Cretian flora. It decorated the pavillion in the so called 'Guset House' or 'Caravanserai.
  • Minoan wall art fresco of 'Ladies in Blue' from Knossos Palace 1600-1450 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  White Background. <br />
<br />
The 'Ladies in Blue' Minoan fresco depicts richy dressed female figures with opulent jewelery and clothing with flamboyant hairstyles refecting the wealth of the Palace of Knossos
  • The Minoan 'Procession Fresco', wall art from the South Prpylaeum, Knossos Palace, 1500-1400 BC . Heraklion Archaeological Museum.<br />
<br />
This latrge Minoan fresco of many figure in procession would have decorated the corridor between the West Porch and the South Propylaeum of Knossos Palace. Both sides of the corridor were painted with hundreds of male and femal;e figures carrying precious utensils and vessels, probably depicting gift bearers to the ruler of the Palace. The composition is much like those found in the Palaces and tombs of Egypt and the near east at the time. Neopalatial final period.
  • The Minoan 'Procession Fresco', wall art from the South Prpylaeum, Knossos Palace, 1500-1400 BC . Heraklion Archaeological Museum.<br />
<br />
This latrge Minoan fresco of many figure in procession would have decorated the corridor between the West Porch and the South Propylaeum of Knossos Palace. Both sides of the corridor were painted with hundreds of male and femal;e figures carrying precious utensils and vessels, probably depicting gift bearers to the ruler of the Palace. The composition is much like those found in the Palaces and tombs of Egypt and the near east at the time. Neopalatial final period.
  • Minoan fresco panel from the 'Lily Frescoes' from the 'Villa of the Lilies' Amnisos, 1600-1500 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum. Black Background. <br />
<br />
Ths freco depicts white lilies against a red background and red lilies against w white backgoround with long stems in front of a fence. The wall art uses fresco and 'in cavo' technique. Neopalatial Period.
  • The Minoan 'Cup Bearer' from the 'Procession Fresco', wall art from the South Prpylaeum, Knossos Palace, 1500-1400 BC . Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  Grey Background. <br />
<br />
The 'Cup Bearer' depicts a youth with long black hair, a naked torso and a richly decorated kilt carrying a large silver rhuyhon ceremonial vessel. This large Minoan fresco of many figure in procession would have decorated the corridor between the West Porch and the South Propylaeum of Knossos Palace. Both sides of the corridor were painted with hundreds of male and femal;e figures carrying precious utensils and vessels, probably depicting gift bearers to the ruler of the Palace. The composition is much like those found in the Palaces and tombs of Egypt and the near east at the time. Neopalatial final period.
  • Minoan 'Blue Monkey' wall art fresco from the 'House of Frescoes' Knossos Palace, 1600-1500 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum. Black Background.
  • The Minoan 'Dolphin Fresco' wall art from the Queen's Megaron, Knossos Palace, 1600-1450 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  White Background. <br />
<br />
Two dolphins are depicted swimming amongst small fish .
  • The Minoan ' Camp Stool' wall art fresco from the West vwing of Knossos Palace, 1450-1300 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  White Background. <br />
<br />
This Minoan fresco probably depicted a typical banquet at Knossos Palace held in the Upper Hall of the West Wing. Figures seated on 'camp stools' are raising cups and kylikes. A female figure with Mediterranean features wearing vivid make up named ' La Parisienne' by Arthur Evans, has a large 'sacred knot' bunched behind her head and maybe she was a priestess.
  • Minoan high relief wall art fresco of Griffins, Gret East Hall, Knossos. 1600-1450 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  White Background. <br />
<br />
This minoan high relief fresco decorated the Great East Hall of Knossos palace. The decoration of the hall included religious scenes depicting boxing, and bull leaping games.
  • The Minoan 'Tripartite Shrine' or ;Grandstand Fresco', wall art from  Knossos Palace, 1600-1450 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum. Black Background. <br />
<br />
The Minoan fresco depicts females seated on a raised platform and a large crowd in what is thought to be the Central Court of Knossos Palace. .
  • Minoan wall art fresco from the Throne Room of Knossos, 1450-1300 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  White Background. <br />
<br />
This Minoan fresco depicts griffins and palm trees
  • Minoan 'Sacred Grove and Dance Freco', wall art from Knossos Palace, 1600-1450 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.   Grey Background. <br />
<br />
This Neopalatial period Minoan fredco comes from thecauseway of the west facade of the palace complex.
  • Minoan wall art fresco of a 'figure of eight' shield from Knossos Palace, 1450-1300 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  White Background. <br />
<br />
<br />
The Final Palatial Period Minoan fresco is from the Grand Staircase of the Palace of Knossos and is a Trompe-l'œil  of minoan warriors shields covered with ox hide.
  • Minoan wall art fresco of a 'figure of eight' shield from Knossos Palace, 1450-1300 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.<br />
<br />
<br />
The Final Palatial Period Minoan fresco is from the Grand Staircase of the Palace of Knossos and is a Trompe-l'œil  of minoan warriors shields covered with ox hide.
  • The Minoan 'Dolphin Fresco' wall art from the Queen's Megaron, Knossos Palace, 1600-1450 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.<br />
<br />
Two dolphins are depicted swimming amongst small fish .
  • Minoan fresco panel from the 'Lily Frescoes' from the 'Villa of the Lilies' Amnisos, 1600-1500 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  Grey Background. <br />
<br />
Ths freco depicts white lilies against a red background and red lilies against w white backgoround with long stems in front of a fence. The wall art uses fresco and 'in cavo' technique. Neopalatial Period.
  • Minoan fresco panel from the 'Lily Frescoes' from the 'Villa of the Lilies' Amnisos, 1600-1500 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  Grey Background. <br />
<br />
Ths freco depicts white lilies against a red background and red lilies against w white backgoround with long stems in front of a fence. The wall art uses fresco and 'in cavo' technique. Neopalatial Period.
  • Minoan floral wall art fresco from Knossos Palace, 1600-1300 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  Grey Background.
  • The Minoan 'Cup Bearer' from the 'Procession Fresco', wall art from the South Prpylaeum, Knossos Palace, 1500-1400 BC . Heraklion Archaeological Museum.<br />
<br />
The 'Cup Bearer' depicts a youth with long black hair, a naked torso and a richly decorated kilt carrying a large silver rhuyhon ceremonial vessel. This large Minoan fresco of many figure in procession would have decorated the corridor between the West Porch and the South Propylaeum of Knossos Palace. Both sides of the corridor were painted with hundreds of male and femal;e figures carrying precious utensils and vessels, probably depicting gift bearers to the ruler of the Palace. The composition is much like those found in the Palaces and tombs of Egypt and the near east at the time. Neopalatial final period.
  • Minoan wall art fresco depicting a female figure, Neopalatial Period, C.1450 BC. Pseira, Crete. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  Grey Background.
  • Minoan 'Prince of the Lilies' wall art freco, Knossos Palace, 1600-1450 BCHeraklion Archaeological Museum.  Grey Background. <br />
<br />
An emblematic image of Minoan Crete this fresco was part of a larger composition in high relief. The fresco depicts a life size figure wearing a coloured kilt with a cod piece and a belt. A majestic crown on his head is adorned with papyrus lilies and peacock feathers. Neopalatial Period.
  • Minoan 'Papyrus wall art fresco from the 'House of Frescoes' Knossos Palace, 1600-1500 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.
  • Minoan 'Blue Monkey' wall art fresco from the 'House of Frescoes' Knossos Palace, 1600-1500 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  White Background.
  • The Minoan 'Procession Fresco', wall art from the South Prpylaeum, Knossos Palace, 1500-1400 BC . Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  White Background. <br />
<br />
This latrge Minoan fresco of many figure in procession would have decorated the corridor between the West Porch and the South Propylaeum of Knossos Palace. Both sides of the corridor were painted with hundreds of male and femal;e figures carrying precious utensils and vessels, probably depicting gift bearers to the ruler of the Palace. The composition is much like those found in the Palaces and tombs of Egypt and the near east at the time. Neopalatial final period.
  • The Minoan 'Saffron Gatherer' wall art fresco, from 'House of Frescoes' Knossos Palace. 1700-1450 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum. Black Background. <br />
<br />
The 'Saffron Gatherers' fresco depicts a blue monket gatering saffron crocuses and placing them in a basket. The saffron is thought to have been a gift to the 'Great Goddess'. One of the earliest frescoes from Knossos.
  • The Minoan 'Blue Boy' or 'Saffron Gatherer' wall art fresco from Knossos Palace, 1600-1300 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  White Background.
  • Close up of The Minoan ' Camp Stool' wall art fresco from the West vwing of Knossos Palace, 1450-1300 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.<br />
<br />
This Minoan fresco probably depicted a typical banquet at Knossos Palace held in the Upper Hall of the West Wing. Figures seated on 'camp stools' are raising cups and kylikes. A female figure with Mediterranean features wearing vivid make up named ' La Parisienne' by Arthur Evans, has a large 'sacred knot' bunched behind her head and maybe she was a priestess.
  • Minoan wall art fresco of 'Ladies in Blue' from Knossos Palace 1600-1450 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  Grey Background. <br />
<br />
The 'Ladies in Blue' Minoan fresco depicts richy dressed female figures with opulent jewelery and clothing with flamboyant hairstyles refecting the wealth of the Palace of Knossos
  • Minoan high relief wall art fresco of Griffins, Gret East Hall, Knossos. 1600-1450 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum. Black Background. <br />
<br />
This minoan high relief fresco decorated the Great East Hall of Knossos palace. The decoration of the hall included religious scenes depicting boxing, and bull leaping games.
  • Minoan wall art freco depicting a procession leading a goat from Agia Triada (Hagia Triada) Crete. 1450-1300 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  White Background. <br />
<br />
This minoan fresco found at the minoan settlement of Hagia Triada, depicts a sacrifical procession leading animals to be sacrificed.
  • Minoan wall art fresco from the Throne Room of Knossos, 1450-1300 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum. Black Background. <br />
<br />
This Minoan fresco depicts griffins and palm trees
  • Minoan wall art depicting 'Blue Monkeys' from Knossos Palace, 1700-1450 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  Grey Background.
  • The Minoan 'Procession Fresco', wall art from the South Prpylaeum, Knossos Palace, 1500-1400 BC . Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  White Background. <br />
<br />
This latrge Minoan fresco of many figure in procession would have decorated the corridor between the West Porch and the South Propylaeum of Knossos Palace. Both sides of the corridor were painted with hundreds of male and femal;e figures carrying precious utensils and vessels, probably depicting gift bearers to the ruler of the Palace. The composition is much like those found in the Palaces and tombs of Egypt and the near east at the time. Neopalatial final period.
  • Minoan 'Sacred Grove and Dance Freco', wall art from Knossos Palace, 1600-1450 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  Black Background. <br />
<br />
This Neopalatial period Minoan fredco comes from thecauseway of the west facade of the palace complex.
  • The Minoan 'Procession Fresco', wall art from the South Prpylaeum, Knossos Palace, 1500-1400 BC . Heraklion Archaeological Museum.<br />
<br />
This latrge Minoan fresco of many figure in procession would have decorated the corridor between the West Porch and the South Propylaeum of Knossos Palace. Both sides of the corridor were painted with hundreds of male and femal;e figures carrying precious utensils and vessels, probably depicting gift bearers to the ruler of the Palace. The composition is much like those found in the Palaces and tombs of Egypt and the near east at the time. Neopalatial final period.
  • The Minoan 'Procession Fresco', wall art from the South Prpylaeum, Knossos Palace, 1500-1400 BC . Heraklion Archaeological Museum.<br />
<br />
This latrge Minoan fresco of many figure in procession would have decorated the corridor between the West Porch and the South Propylaeum of Knossos Palace. Both sides of the corridor were painted with hundreds of male and femal;e figures carrying precious utensils and vessels, probably depicting gift bearers to the ruler of the Palace. The composition is much like those found in the Palaces and tombs of Egypt and the near east at the time. Neopalatial final period.
  • The Minoan 'Blue Boy' or 'Saffron Gatherer' wall art fresco from Knossos Palace, 1600-1300 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.
  • The Minoan 'Saffron Gatherer' wall art fresco, from 'House of Frescoes' Knossos Palace. 1700-1450 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.<br />
<br />
The 'Saffron Gatherers' fresco depicts a blue monket gatering saffron crocuses and placing them in a basket. The saffron is thought to have been a gift to the 'Great Goddess'. One of the earliest frescoes from Knossos.
  • The Minoan 'Procession Fresco', wall art from the South Prpylaeum, Knossos Palace, 1500-1400 BC . Heraklion Archaeological Museum.<br />
<br />
This latrge Minoan fresco of many figure in procession would have decorated the corridor between the West Porch and the South Propylaeum of Knossos Palace. Both sides of the corridor were painted with hundreds of male and femal;e figures carrying precious utensils and vessels, probably depicting gift bearers to the ruler of the Palace. The composition is much like those found in the Palaces and tombs of Egypt and the near east at the time. Neopalatial final period.
  • The Minoan 'Blue Boy' or 'Saffron Gatherer' wall art fresco from Knossos Palace, 1600-1300 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.
  • Minoan wall art fresco of a 'figure of eight' shield from Knossos Palace, 1450-1300 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.<br />
<br />
<br />
The Final Palatial Period Minoan fresco is from the Grand Staircase of the Palace of Knossos and is a Trompe-l'œil  of minoan warriors shields covered with ox hide.
  • The Minoan 'Cup Bearer' from the 'Procession Fresco', wall art from the South Prpylaeum, Knossos Palace, 1500-1400 BC . Heraklion Archaeological Museum.<br />
<br />
The 'Cup Bearer' depicts a youth with long black hair, a naked torso and a richly decorated kilt carrying a large silver rhuyhon ceremonial vessel. This large Minoan fresco of many figure in procession would have decorated the corridor between the West Porch and the South Propylaeum of Knossos Palace. Both sides of the corridor were painted with hundreds of male and femal;e figures carrying precious utensils and vessels, probably depicting gift bearers to the ruler of the Palace. The composition is much like those found in the Palaces and tombs of Egypt and the near east at the time. Neopalatial final period.
  • Minoan fresco panel from the 'Lily Frescoes' from the 'Villa of the Lilies' Amnisos, 1600-1500 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  White Background. <br />
<br />
Ths freco depicts white lilies against a red background and red lilies against w white backgoround with long stems in front of a fence. The wall art uses fresco and 'in cavo' technique. Neopalatial Period.
  • The Minoan 'Cup Bearer' from the 'Procession Fresco', wall art from the South Prpylaeum, Knossos Palace, 1500-1400 BC . Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  White Background. <br />
<br />
The 'Cup Bearer' depicts a youth with long black hair, a naked torso and a richly decorated kilt carrying a large silver rhuyhon ceremonial vessel. This large Minoan fresco of many figure in procession would have decorated the corridor between the West Porch and the South Propylaeum of Knossos Palace. Both sides of the corridor were painted with hundreds of male and femal;e figures carrying precious utensils and vessels, probably depicting gift bearers to the ruler of the Palace. The composition is much like those found in the Palaces and tombs of Egypt and the near east at the time. Neopalatial final period.
  • Minoan floral wall art fresco from Knossos Palace, 1600-1300 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  White Background.
  • Minoan floral wall art fresco from Knossos Palace, 1600-1300 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.
  • Minoan Bull wall art fresco , West Bastion, Knossos Palace, 1600-1450 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.<br />
<br />
The Minoan Bull fresco was part of a larger composition which probably had a hunter or bull leaper in it. It is a masterpiece of Minoan naturalism and a work of high quality and expresive power.
  • Minoan floral wall art fresco from Knossos Palace, 1600-1300 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  White Background.
  • Minoan Bull wall art fresco , West Bastion, Knossos Palace, 1600-1450 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  White Background. <br />
<br />
The Minoan Bull fresco was part of a larger composition which probably had a hunter or bull leaper in it. It is a masterpiece of Minoan naturalism and a work of high quality and expresive power.
  • Minoan Bull wall art fresco , West Bastion, Knossos Palace, 1600-1450 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum. Black Background. <br />
<br />
The Minoan Bull fresco was part of a larger composition which probably had a hunter or bull leaper in it. It is a masterpiece of Minoan naturalism and a work of high quality and expresive power.
  • Minoan wall art fresco depicting a female figure, Neopalatial Period, C.1450 BC. Pseira, Crete. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  White Background.
  • Minoan wall art fresco depicting a female figure, Neopalatial Period, C.1450 BC. Pseira, Crete. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  White Background.
  • Minoan 'Papyrus wall art fresco from the 'House of Frescoes' Knossos Palace, 1600-1500 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  White Background.
  • The Minoan 'Procession Fresco' close up , wall art from the South Prpylaeum, Knossos Palace, 1500-1400 BC . Heraklion Archaeological Museum.<br />
<br />
This latrge Minoan fresco of many figure in procession would have decorated the corridor between the West Porch and the South Propylaeum of Knossos Palace. Both sides of the corridor were painted with hundreds of male and femal;e figures carrying precious utensils and vessels, probably depicting gift bearers to the ruler of the Palace. The composition is much like those found in the Palaces and tombs of Egypt and the near east at the time. Neopalatial final period.
  • The Minoan 'Procession Fresco', wall art from the South Prpylaeum, Knossos Palace, 1500-1400 BC . Heraklion Archaeological Museum. Black Background. <br />
<br />
This latrge Minoan fresco of many figure in procession would have decorated the corridor between the West Porch and the South Propylaeum of Knossos Palace. Both sides of the corridor were painted with hundreds of male and femal;e figures carrying precious utensils and vessels, probably depicting gift bearers to the ruler of the Palace. The composition is much like those found in the Palaces and tombs of Egypt and the near east at the time. Neopalatial final period.
  • The Minoan 'Dolphin Fresco' wall art from the Queen's Megaron, Knossos Palace, 1600-1450 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.<br />
<br />
Two dolphins are depicted swimming amongst small fish .
  • Minoan wall art fresco of 'Ladies in Blue' from Knossos Palace 1600-1450 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum. Black Background. <br />
<br />
The 'Ladies in Blue' Minoan fresco depicts richy dressed female figures with opulent jewelery and clothing with flamboyant hairstyles refecting the wealth of the Palace of Knossos
  • Minoan wall art depicting 'Blue Monkeys' from Knossos Palace, 1700-1450 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  White Background.
  • The Minoan 'Tripartite Shrine' or ;Grandstand Fresco', wall art from  Knossos Palace, 1600-1450 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  White Background. <br />
<br />
The Minoan fresco depicts females seated on a raised platform and a large crowd in what is thought to be the Central Court of Knossos Palace. .
  • The Minoan 'Procession Fresco', wall art from the South Prpylaeum, Knossos Palace, 1500-1400 BC . Heraklion Archaeological Museum. Black Background. <br />
<br />
This latrge Minoan fresco of many figure in procession would have decorated the corridor between the West Porch and the South Propylaeum of Knossos Palace. Both sides of the corridor were painted with hundreds of male and femal;e figures carrying precious utensils and vessels, probably depicting gift bearers to the ruler of the Palace. The composition is much like those found in the Palaces and tombs of Egypt and the near east at the time. Neopalatial final period.
  • Minoan wall art fresco of a 'figure of eight' shield from Knossos Palace, 1450-1300 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  Grey Background. <br />
<br />
<br />
The Final Palatial Period Minoan fresco is from the Grand Staircase of the Palace of Knossos and is a Trompe-l'œil  of minoan warriors shields covered with ox hide.
  • Minoan 'Sacred Grove and Dance Freco', wall art from Knossos Palace, 1600-1450 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.   White Background. <br />
<br />
This Neopalatial period Minoan fredco comes from thecauseway of the west facade of the palace complex.
  • The 'figure of eight shield'  Mycenaean fresco wall painting, Mycenae, Greece Cat No 11672. National Archaeological Museum, Athens.  Grey art Background <br />
<br />
The Mycenaean 'figure of eight shield' were originaly made of cows hide and was the symbol of a goddess of war.
  • Mycenaean fresco wall painting of a marine scape. National Archaeological Museum Athens. Cat No 5844. Grey art Background <br />
<br />
The Mycenaean fresco fragments depict a marine scape with flying fish diving and swimming with sponges attached to rocks.
  • Mycenaean fresco wall painting of three women, Ramp House, Mycenae Acropolis, Greece Cat No 1015. National Archaeological Museum, Athens. Grey art Background <br />
<br />
This 14th Cent BC Mycenaean fresco fragment depicts three women looking out of a window. The scene is festive and the veneration gestures of the women suggest that they are watching a religiuos procession through the window.
  • Mycenaean fresco wall painting of hunting demons, Mycenae Acropolis, Greece Cat No 2665. National Archaeological Museum, Athens. Grey art Background <br />
<br />
The Mycenaean fresco fragment depicts three animal demons with donkey heads holding a wooden pole over their shoulders from which hangs the prey thay have been hunting. This type of demon originated in Egypt.
  • Mycenaean Fresco wall painting of a Mycanaean Women bearing offerings, Later Palace,  Tiryns, Greece.  Athens Archaeological Museum. Grey art Background <br />
<br />
14th  Cent BC. Cat No 15883. The Mycenaean fresco fragments depict a women in a procession bearing offerings for a deity. Their facial characteristic and elaborate hairstyles and rich garments are clearly visible.
  • Mycenaean Fresco wall painting of a Mycanaean chariot, Later Palace,  Tiryns, Greece.  Athens Archaeological Museum. Grey art Background <br />
<br />
14th  Cent BC. Cat No 5879. Mycanaean chariots were use for hunting as well as battle.
  • Mycenaean Fresco wall painting of a Mycanaean acrobat leaping over a bull, Early Palace,  Tiryns, Greece.  Athens Archaeological Museum. Grey art Background <br />
<br />
14th  Cent BC.. Cat No 1595. The Mycenaean Fresco depicts an acrobat leaping over a charging bull whilst holding onto its horns. This ritual symbolised the struggle of domination of man over wild nature.
  • Mycenaean Fresco wall painting of a Mycanaean footman leading a horse & hunting dog,  Tiryns, Greece. 14th - 13th Century BC. Athens Archaeological Museum. Cat No 5878.  Grey art Background
  • The 'Mycenaean Lady' fresco wall painting depicting a women in a procession, Mycenae, Greece Cat No 11670. National Archaeological Museum, Athens. Grey art Background <br />
<br />
The 'Mycenaean Lady' fresco depicts a women with a serious and pensive expression of a goddess in a solemn moment during which she accepts a gift of a necklace which she hold tightly in her right hand. she wears a short sleeved bodice over a sheer blouse which deliniates her bosom. She has an  intricate hairstyle and wears rich jewellery.
  • Mycenaean fresco wall painting of a women in a procession, Mycenae, Greece Cat No 11651. National Archaeological Museum, Athens. Grey art Background <br />
<br />
The Mycenaean fresco fragment depicts a women in a procession. Her head is in profile and her body is depicted frontally. She holds a lily as a gift to a goddess.
  • Minoan Bull wall art fresco , West Bastion, Knossos Palace, 1600-1450 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.<br />
<br />
The Minoan Bull fresco was part of a larger composition which probably had a hunter or bull leaper in it. It is a masterpiece of Minoan naturalism and a work of high quality and expresive power.
  • Minoan 'Papyrus wall art fresco from the 'House of Frescoes' Knossos Palace, 1600-1500 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.
  • Minoan wall art fresco depicting a female figure, Neopalatial Period, C.1450 BC. Pseira, Crete. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  Grey Background.
  • The Minoan 'Saffron Gatherer' wall art fresco, from 'House of Frescoes' Knossos Palace. 1700-1450 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  Grey Background. <br />
<br />
The 'Saffron Gatherers' fresco depicts a blue monket gatering saffron crocuses and placing them in a basket. The saffron is thought to have been a gift to the 'Great Goddess'. One of the earliest frescoes from Knossos.
  • Minoan fresco panel from the 'Lily Frescoes' from the 'Villa of the Lilies' Amnisos, 1600-1500 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  Grey Background. <br />
<br />
Ths freco depicts white lilies against a red background and red lilies against w white backgoround with long stems in front of a fence. The wall art uses fresco and 'in cavo' technique. Neopalatial Period.
  • Minoan 'Blue Monkey' wall art fresco from the 'House of Frescoes' Knossos Palace, 1600-1500 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  Grey Background.
  • Minoan wall art fresco from the Throne Room of Knossos, 1450-1300 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.  Grey Background. <br />
<br />
This Minoan fresco depicts griffins and palm trees
  • The Minoan 'Saffron Gatherer' wall art fresco, from 'House of Frescoes' Knossos Palace. 1700-1450 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum.<br />
<br />
The 'Saffron Gatherers' fresco depicts a blue monket gatering saffron crocuses and placing them in a basket. The saffron is thought to have been a gift to the 'Great Goddess'. One of the earliest frescoes from Knossos.
  • Minoan fresco panel from the 'Lily Frescoes' from the 'Villa of the Lilies' Amnisos, 1600-1500 BC. Heraklion Archaeological Museum. Black Background. <br />
<br />
Ths freco depicts white lilies against a red background and red lilies against w white backgoround with long stems in front of a fence. The wall art uses fresco and 'in cavo' technique. Neopalatial Period.
  • Minoan wall art fresco depicting a female figure, Neopalatial Period, C.1450 BC. Pseira, Crete. Heraklion Archaeological Museum. Black Background.

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