• The Hill city of Chora (Hora),  Ios, Greece, Cyclades Island
  • Greek Orthodox Chapels and Church on Chora hill (Hora), Ios, Cyclades Islands, Greece.
  • Greek Orthodox Chapels and Church on Chora hill (Hora), Ios, Cyclades Islands, Greece.
  • Greek Orthodox Chapels and Church on Chora hill (Hora), Ios, Cyclades Islands, Greece.
  • Greek Orthodox Chapels and Church on Chora hill (Hora), Ios, Cyclades Islands, Greece.
  • Greek Orthodox Chapels and Church on Chora hill (Hora), Ios, Cyclades Islands, Greece.
  • The Hill city of Chora, Ios, Greece, Cyclades Island
  • The Hill city of Chora, Ios, Greece, Cyclades Island
  • The Hill city of Chora, Ios, Greece, Cyclades Island
  • The Hill city of Chora, Ios, Greece, Cyclades Island
  • The Hill city of Chora, Ios, Greece, Cyclades Island
  • The Hill city of Chora, Ios, Greece, Cyclades Island
  • The Hill city of Chora (Hora),  Ios, Greece, Cyclades Island
  • Interior of one of the 365  Greek Orthodox Chapels of Ios with religious icons. Cyclades Islands, Greece
  • Interior of one of the 365  Greek Orthodox Chapels of Ios with religious icons. Cyclades Islands, Greece
  • Interior of one of the 365  Greek Orthodox Chapels of Ios with religious icons. Cyclades Islands, Greece
  • Interior of one of the 365  Greek Orthodox Chapels of Ios with religious icons. Cyclades Islands, Greece
  • Interior of one of the 365  Greek Orthodox Chapels of Ios with religious icons. Cyclades Islands, Greece
  • Interior of one of the 365  Greek Orthodox Chapels of Ios with religious icons. Cyclades Islands, Greece
  • Interior of one of the 365  Greek Orthodox Chapels of Ios with religious icons. Cyclades Islands, Greece
  • Interior of one of the 365  Greek Orthodox Chapels of Ios with religious icons. Cyclades Islands, Greece
  • Interior of one of the 365  Greek Orthodox Chapels of Ios with religious icons. Cyclades Islands, Greece
  • church of the Greek Orthodox monastery of Kalamos, Ios, Cyclades Islands, Greece
  • Bell tower entrance of the Greek Orthodox monastery of Kalamos, Ios, Cyclades Islands, Greece
  • Bell tower entrance of the Greek Orthodox monastery of Kalamos, Ios, Cyclades Islands, Greece
  • Bell tower entrance of the Greek Orthodox monastery of Kalamos, Ios, Cyclades Islands, Greece
  • Byzantine Greek Orthodox Chapel of Panaghia Gremiotissa. Chora  (Hora), Ios, Cyclades Islands, Greece.
  • The Hill city of Chora (Hora),  Ios, Greece, Cyclades Island
  • The Byzantine church of Agia Irene on the harbour of Ormos, Ios, Cyclades Islands, Greece
  • The Byzantine church of Agia Irene on the harbour of Ormos, Ios, Cyclades Islands, Greece
  • The Byzantine church of Agia Irene on the harbour of Ormos, Ios, Cyclades Islands, Greece
  • Blue domed Byzantine Greek Orthodox Chapel of Panaghia Gremiotissa. Chora  (Hora), Ios, Cyclades Islands, Greece.
  • Blue domed Byzantine Greek Orthodox Chapel of Panaghia Gremiotissa. Chora  (Hora), Ios, Cyclades Islands, Greece.
  • Blue domed white Byzantine Greek Orthodox Chapel of Panaghia Gremiotissa. Chora  (Hora), Ios, Cyclades Islands, Greece.
  • Blue domed white Byzantine Greek Orthodox Chapel of Panaghia Gremiotissa. Chora  (Hora), Ios, Cyclades Islands, Greece.
  • One of the 365 traditional white Orthodox chaples on Ios, Cylades Islands, Greece
  • Smoked Magalicsa hams
  • Corn cobs drying - Hungary
  • Corn cobs drying - Hungary
  • Fresh cobs of Maize, Corn Sweetcorn photos
  • Barbecue chicken wings with salad
  • The cathedral of Santa Astuna, Positano, Amalfi coast, Italy
  • Buildings on the main square, Rust ( Hungarian: Ruszt ) on the Neusiedler See, Burgenland, Austria
  • Braeburn Apples
  • Dressed Fresh prepared Lobster
  • Organic beef burger with tomato relish and salad in a bun photo. Funky Stock Photos
  • beef burger with sweetcorn relish and salad in a bun photos. Funky Stock Photos
  • beef burger with sweetcorn relish and salad in a bun photos. Funky Stock Photos
  • BBQ chicken wings
  • Spicy BBQ Chicken wings and thights on a plate with a blue edge and stars
  • BBQ beef burgers being cooked on a bbq grill. Funky Stock library burger images of bbq food.
  • BBQ beef burgers being cooked on a bbq grill. Funky Stock library burger images of bbq food.
  • Close up of the sculpture of the twelve gods of the underworld from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber B,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Close up of the sculpture of the twelve gods of the underworld from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber B,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Close up of the sculpture of the twelve gods of the underworld from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber B,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Close up of the sculpture of the twelve gods of the underworld from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber B,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Sculpture of the twelve gods of the underworld from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber B,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Figure of a god from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • End relief panel of the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Procession of male gods in the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Procession of male gods in the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Procession of male gods in the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A,  Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Picture of Yazilikaya [ i.e written riock ], Hattusa  The largest known Hittite sanctuary. 13th century BC made in the reign of Tudhaliya 1V .1
  • Procession of male gods in the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A, Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Depictions of gods on the end relief panel of the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber A, Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey.
  • Sculpture of the twelve gods of the underworld from the 13th century BC Hittite religious rock carvings of Yazılıkaya Hittite rock sanctuary, chamber B, Hattusa, Bogazale, Turkey. Plastercast at the Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin.
  • The sword of God from the Sancutary of Yazilikaza, Hattusha, Turkey. Probably the weirdest representation of the rock sanctuary Yazilikaza, shows a sword God. He is waering a high pointed cap, whose ornamented with horns showing he is a divine character. The lower part of his body is formed of two hanging lions that merge into a sword blade . The body of God seems to form the sword handle and the sword being stuck into the ground could indicate that there is a god of the underworld. Cast from the original. Vorderasiatisches Museum, Pergamon Museum, Berlin
  • Lichens growing on rocks
  • Interior of The Szeged Synagogue, Eclectic Style. Hungary
  • Interior of The Szeged Synagogue, Eclectic Style. Hungary
  • Deutsch Palace - Dozsa Gy. u.2 - Eclectic building (1900-1901) with Zsolnay ceramics, Szeged, Hungary
  • Szeged 18th century City Hall, Szechenyi Square, Hungary
  • Barbecue burgers on a BBQ grill
  • Crustose lichens growing on a rock on the Greek Island of Ios
  • Crustose lichens growing on a rock on the Greek Island of Ios
  • Interior of one of the 365  Greek Orthodox Chapels of Ios with religious icons. Cyclades Islands, Greece
  • Blue domed white Byzantine Greek Orthodox Chapel of Panaghia Gremiotissa. Chora  (Hora), Ios, Cyclades Islands, Greece.
  • Blue domed Byzantine Greek Orthodox Chapel of Panaghia Gremiotissa. Chora  (Hora), Ios, Cyclades Islands, Greece.
  • Green Lichens growing on rocks on the Greek Island of Ios.
  • The Windmills overlooking  Chora town. Ios Cylcades Islands, Greece.
  • Greek Orthodox Chapels and Church on Chora hill (Hora), Ios, Cyclades Islands, Greece.
  • The Hill city of Chora, Ios, Greece, Cyclades Island
  • Dry stone wall on the Greek Island of Ios, Greece
  • The Windmills overlooking  Chora town. Ios Cylcades Islands, Greece.
  • The Windmills overlooking  Chora town. Ios Cylcades Islands, Greece.
  • The Hill city of Chora (Hora),  Ios, Greece, Cyclades Island
  • The Hill city of Chora (Hora),  Ios, Greece, Cyclades Island
  • The Hill city of Chora, Ios, Greece, Cyclades Island
  • Interior of one of the 365  Greek Orthodox Chapels of Ios with religious icons. Cyclades Islands, Greece
  • Sunrise over the Cyclades Island of Ios, Greece
  • Corn cobs drying - Hungary
  • Stock photos of BBQ beef and a brochette of vegetables. Funky Stock library images of bbq food
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements de Kelescan, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Menec, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • Avebury Neolithic standing stone Circle the largest in England, Wiltshire, England, Europe
  • Avebury Neolithic standing stone Circle the largest in England, Wiltshire, England, Europe
  • Avebury Neolithic standing stone Circle the largest in England, Wiltshire, England, Europe
  • Avebury Neolithic standing stone Circle the largest in England at sunset, Wiltshire, England, Europe
  • Avebury Neolithic standing stone Circle the largest in England, Wiltshire, England, Europe
  • Exterior of the mud brick Kasbah of Taourirt, Ouarzazate, Morocco, built by Pasha Glaoui. A Unesco World Heritage Site
  • Stonehenge Neolithic ancient standing stone circle monument, Wilshire, England
  • Stonehenge Neolithic ancient standing stone circle monument, Wilshire, England
  • Stonehenge Neolithic ancient standing stone circle monument, Wilshire, England
  • Stonehenge Neolithic ancient standing stone circle monument, Wilshire, England
  • Stonehenge Neolithic ancient standing stone circle monument, Wilshire, England
  • Stonehenge Neolithic ancient standing stone circle monument, Wilshire, England
  • Avebury Neolithic standing stone Circle the largest in England, Wiltshire, England, Europe
  • Avebury Neolithic standing stone Circle the largest in England at sunset, Wiltshire, England, Europe
  • Avebury Neolithic standing stone Circle the largest in England, Wiltshire, England, Europe
  • Avebury Neolithic standing stone Circle the largest in England at sunset, Wiltshire, England, Europe
  • Avebury Neolithic standing stone Circle the largest in England, Wiltshire, England, Europe
  • Avebury Neolithic standing stone Circle the largest in England, Wiltshire, England, Europe
  • Avebury Neolithic standing stone Circle the largest in England, Wiltshire, England, Europe
  • Avebury Neolithic standing stone Circle the largest in England, Wiltshire, England, Europe
  • Avebury Neolithic standing stone Circle the largest in England, Wiltshire, England, Europe
  • Avebury Neolithic standing stone Circle the largest in England, Wiltshire, England, Europe
  • Avebury Neolithic standing stone Circle the largest in England, Wiltshire, England, Europe
  • Avebury Neolithic standing stone Circle the largest in England, Wiltshire, England, Europe
  • Exterior of the mud brick Kasbah of Taourirt, Ouarzazate, Morocco, built by Pasha Glaoui. A Unesco World Heritage Site
  • Exterior of the mud brick Kasbah of Taourirt, Ouarzazate, Morocco, built by Pasha Glaoui. A Unesco World Heritage Site
  • Exterior of the mud brick Kasbah of Taourirt, Ouarzazate, Morocco, built by Pasha Glaoui. A Unesco World Heritage Site
  • Exterior of the mud brick Kasbah of Taourirt, Ouarzazate, Morocco, built by Pasha Glaoui. A Unesco World Heritage Site
  • Exterior of the mud brick Kasbah of Taourirt, Ouarzazate, Morocco, built by Pasha Glaoui. A Unesco World Heritage Site
  • Exterior of the mud brick Kasbah of Taourirt, Ouarzazate, Morocco, built by Pasha Glaoui. A Unesco World Heritage Site
  • Exterior of the mud brick Kasbah of Taourirt, Ouarzazate, Morocco, built by Pasha Glaoui. A Unesco World Heritage Site
  • Exterior of the mud brick Kasbah of Taourirt, Ouarzazate, Morocco, built by Pasha Glaoui. A Unesco World Heritage Site
  • Exterior of the mud brick Kasbah of Taourirt, Ouarzazate, Morocco, built by Pasha Glaoui. A Unesco World Heritage Site
  • Exterior of the mud brick Kasbah of Taourirt, Ouarzazate, Morocco, built by Pasha Glaoui. A Unesco World Heritage Site
  • Exterior of the mud brick Kasbah of Taourirt, Ouarzazate, Morocco, built by Pasha Glaoui. A Unesco World Heritage Site
  • Exterior of the mud brick Kasbah of Taourirt, Ouarzazate, Morocco, built by Pasha Glaoui. A Unesco World Heritage Site
  • Exterior of the mud brick Kasbah of Taourirt, Ouarzazate, Morocco, built by Pasha Glaoui. A Unesco World Heritage Site
  • Exterior of the mud brick Kasbah of Taourirt, Ouarzazate, Morocco, built by Pasha Glaoui. A Unesco World Heritage Site
  • Exterior of the mud brick Kasbah of Taourirt, Ouarzazate, Morocco, built by Pasha Glaoui. A Unesco World Heritage Site
  • Exterior of the mud brick Kasbah of Taourirt, Ouarzazate, Morocco, built by Pasha Glaoui. A Unesco World Heritage Site
  • Exterior of the mud brick Kasbah of Taourirt, Ouarzazate, Morocco, built by Pasha Glaoui. A Unesco World Heritage Site
  • Exterior of the mud brick Kasbah of Taourirt, Ouarzazate, Morocco, built by Pasha Glaoui. A Unesco World Heritage Site
  • Exterior of the mud brick Kasbah of Taourirt, Ouarzazate, Morocco, built by Pasha Glaoui. A Unesco World Heritage Site
  • Exterior of the mud brick Kasbah of Taourirt, Ouarzazate, Morocco, built by Pasha Glaoui. A Unesco World Heritage Site
  • Exterior of the mud brick Kasbah of Taourirt, Ouarzazate, Morocco, built by Pasha Glaoui. A Unesco World Heritage Site
  • Exterior of the mud brick Kasbah of Taourirt, Ouarzazate, Morocco, built by Pasha Glaoui. A Unesco World Heritage Site
  • Exterior of the mud brick Kasbah of Taourirt, Ouarzazate, Morocco, built by Pasha Glaoui. A Unesco World Heritage Site
  • Exterior of the mud brick Kasbah of Taourirt, Ouarzazate, Morocco, built by Pasha Glaoui. A Unesco World Heritage Site
  • Exterior of the mud brick Kasbah of Taourirt, Ouarzazate, Morocco, built by Pasha Glaoui. A Unesco World Heritage Site
  • Exterior of the mud brick Kasbah of Taourirt, Ouarzazate, Morocco, built by Pasha Glaoui. A Unesco World Heritage Site
  • Exterior of the mud brick Kasbah of Taourirt, Ouarzazate, Morocco, built by Pasha Glaoui. A Unesco World Heritage Site
  • Exterior of the mud brick Kasbah of Taourirt, Ouarzazate, Morocco, built by Pasha Glaoui. A Unesco World Heritage Site
  • Exterior of the mud brick Kasbah of Taourirt, Ouarzazate, Morocco, built by Pasha Glaoui. A Unesco World Heritage Site
  • Exterior of the mud brick Kasbah of Taourirt, Ouarzazate, Morocco, built by Pasha Glaoui. A Unesco World Heritage Site
  • Exterior of the mud brick Kasbah of Taourirt, Ouarzazate, Morocco, built by Pasha Glaoui. A Unesco World Heritage Site
  • Exterior of the mud brick Kasbah of Taourirt, Ouarzazate, Morocco, built by Pasha Glaoui. A Unesco World Heritage Site
  • Exterior of the mud brick Kasbah of Taourirt, Ouarzazate, Morocco, built by Pasha Glaoui. A Unesco World Heritage Site
  • Exterior of the mud brick Kasbah of Taourirt, Ouarzazate, Morocco, built by Pasha Glaoui. A Unesco World Heritage Site
  • Exterior of the mud brick Kasbah of Taourirt, Ouarzazate, Morocco, built by Pasha Glaoui. A Unesco World Heritage Site
  • Exterior of the mud brick Kasbah of Taourirt, Ouarzazate, Morocco, built by Pasha Glaoui. A Unesco World Heritage Site
  • Exterior of the mud brick Kasbah of Taourirt, Ouarzazate, Morocco, built by Pasha Glaoui. A Unesco World Heritage Site
  • Exterior of the mud brick Kasbah of Taourirt, Ouarzazate, Morocco, built by Pasha Glaoui. A Unesco World Heritage Site
  • Exterior of the mud brick Kasbah of Taourirt, Ouarzazate, Morocco, built by Pasha Glaoui. A Unesco World Heritage Site
  • Exterior of the mud brick Kasbah of Taourirt, Ouarzazate, Morocco, built by Pasha Glaoui. A Unesco World Heritage Site
  • Exterior of the mud brick Kasbah of Taourirt, Ouarzazate, Morocco, built by Pasha Glaoui. A Unesco World Heritage Site
  • Exterior of the mud brick Kasbah of Taourirt, Ouarzazate, Morocco, built by Pasha Glaoui. A Unesco World Heritage Site
  • Venetian Gothic Palaces on the Grand Canal Venice
  • The punta della doganaand  Santa Maria della Salute on the Giudecca Canal, Venice Italy
  • The island of San Giorgio Maggiore lying east of the Giudecca and south of the main island group, with its church front designed by Andrea Palladio and begun in 1566.  Venice Italy
  • The 14th Century Gothic style column capitals of The Doge's Palace on St Marks Square, Palazzo Ducale, Venice Italy
  • Gothic style Ceremonial entrance, the Porta della Carta ( 1438-1442), on the eastern facade of The Doge's Palace with statues of sculptural portrait of the Doge Francesco Foscari kneeling before the St. Mark's Lion.  , Palazzo Ducale, Venice Italy
  • The 14th Century Gothic style eastern facade of The Doge's Palace on St Marks Square, Palazzo Ducale, Venice Italy
  • The 14th Century Gothic style balcony on the south facade of The Doge's Palace, Palazzo Ducale, Venice Italy
  • Arial view form St Mark's Campinale of St Mark's Square and the Doges with the island of San Giorgio Maggiore behind , with its church front designed by Andrea Palladio and begun in 1566.  Venice Italy
  • The 14th Century Gothic style statues of the Doge & the winger lion of St Mark on the south facade of The Doge's Palace, Palazzo Ducale, Venice Italy
  • The island of San Giorgio Maggiore lying east of the Giudecca and south of the main island group, with its church front designed by Andrea Palladio and begun in 1566.  Venice Italy
  • Palazzo Ca'Rezzonico built in 1649 by Baldassarre Longhena in a Baroque style on the Grand Canal Venice
  • The Grand Canal from Ponte dell'Accademia at sunset; in the foreground Palazzo Cavalli-Franchetti
  • Palazzo Ca'Rezzonico built in 1649 by Baldassarre Longhena in a Baroque style on the Grand Canal Venice
  • Panorama of The punta della doganaand  Santa Maria della Salute on the Giudecca Canal, Venice Italy
  • Gondolas on a small Canal near Rialto , Venice, Italy
  • Gondolas at St Mark's Square with the island of San Giorgio Maggiore behind , with its church front designed by Andrea Palladio and begun in 1566.  Venice Italy
  • The island of San Giorgio Maggiore lying east of the Giudecca and south of the main island group, with its church front designed by Andrea Palladio and begun in 1566.  Venice Italy
  • Sunset view of gondolas at St Mark's Square with the island of San Giorgio Maggiore behind , with its church front designed by Andrea Palladio and begun in 1566.  Venice Italy
  • The island of San Giorgio Maggiore lying east of the Giudecca and south of the main island group, with its church front designed by Andrea Palladio and begun in 1566.  Venice Italy
  • The 14th Century Gothic style architectural details of The Doge's Palace on St Marks Square, Palazzo Ducale, Venice Italy
  • Gothic style Ceremonial entrance, the Porta della Carta ( 1438-1442), on the eastern facade of The Doge's Palace with statues of sculptural portrait of the Doge Francesco Foscari kneeling before the St. Mark's Lion.  , Palazzo Ducale, Venice Italy
  • The 14th Century Gothic style eastern facade of The Doge's Palace on St Marks Square, Palazzo Ducale, Venice Italy
  • The 14th Century Gothic style eastern facade of The Doge's Palace on St Marks Square, Palazzo Ducale, Venice Italy
  • The 14th Century Gothic style balcony on the south facade of The Doge's Palace, Palazzo Ducale, Venice Italy
  • The 14th Century Gothic style balcony on the south facade of The Doge's Palace, Palazzo Ducale, Venice Italy
  • The 14th Century Gothic style statues of the Doge & the winger lion of St Mark on the south facade of The Doge's Palace, Palazzo Ducale, Venice Italy
  • The Palazzo Cavalli-Franchetti on the Grand Canal from Ponte dell'Accademia at sunset; in the foreground
  • Venetian Gothic Palaces on the Grand Canal Venice
  • Venetian Gothic Palaces on the Grand Canal Venice
  • The 14th Century Gothic style column capitals of The Doge's Palace on St Marks Square, Palazzo Ducale, Venice Italy
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, Alignements du Kermario, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of Carnac neolthic standing stones monaliths, a pre-Celtic site of standing stomes used from 4500 to 2000 BC,<br />
<br />
Carnac is famous as the site of more than 10,000 Neolithic standing stones, also known as menhirs. The stones were hewn from local rock and erected by the pre-Celtic people of Brittany. The Carnac stones were erected during the Neolithic period which lasted from around 4500 BC until 2000 BC. One interpretation of the site is that successive generations visited the site to erect a stone in honour of their ancestors.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.
  • View of neolthic Castlerigg Stone Circle monaliths and the Lake District, England,  built circa 2500 BC.<br />
<br />
Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4500 years ago by prehistoric farming communities who settles in the fertile valleys of the Lake District.  Current thinking has linked Castlerigg with the Neolithic Langdale axe industry in the nearby Langdale fells: the circle may have been a meeting place where these axes were traded or exchanged. Ritually deposited stone axes have been found all over Britain, suggesting that their uses went far beyond their practical capabilities. Exchange or trading of stone axes may not have been possible without first taking part in a ritual or ceremony.

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