• A modern designed cake with a sponge case and chocolate filling
  • modern designed white chocolate cake with a sponge case and strawberry filling, covered with pink white chocolate powder
  • A modern fruit cake with redcurrants, wild strawberries, blacberry and creme patisserie in a light sponge case in a designer dish.
  • modern designed chocolate cake with a sponge case and chocolate filling, covered with cocoa powder
  • A modern designed cake with a sponge case and chocolate filling
  • modern designed white chocolate cake with a sponge case and strawberry filling, covered with pink white chocolate powder
  • modern designed white chocolate cake with a sponge case and strawberry filling, covered with pink white chocolate powder
  • modern designed white chocolate cake with a sponge case and strawberry filling, covered with pink white chocolate powder
  • A modern fruit cake with redcurrants, wild strawberries, blacberry and creme patisserie in a light sponge case in a designer dish.
  • modern designed chocolate cakes with a sponge case and chocolate filling, covered with cocoa powder
  • modern designed chocolate cake with a sponge case and chocolate filling, covered with cocoa powder
  • A modern designed cake with a sponge case and chocolate filling
  • modern designed white chocolate cake with a sponge case and strawberry filling, covered with pink white chocolate powder in a  Traditionl black Japanese tea setting
  • A modern designed cake with a sponge case and chocolate filling in a Traditionl black Japanese tea setting
  • A modern fruit cake with redcurrants, wild strawberries, blacberry and creme patisserie in a light sponge case Traditionl black Japanese tea setting
  • A modern fruit cake with redcurrants, wild strawberries, blacberry and creme patisserie in a light sponge case in a designer dish.
  • modern designed chocolate cakes with a sponge case and chocolate filling, covered with cocoa powder
  • A modern designed cake with a sponge case and chocolate filling
  • modern designed chocolate cake with a sponge case and chocolate filling, covered with cocoa powder
  • A modern square chocolate cake filled with chocolate truffle and topped with fresh raspberries
  • Traditional chocolate Swiss roll or log.
  • A modern square chocolate cake filled with chocolate truffle and topped with fresh raspberries
  • Slices of quiche Loraine on a white background
  • Slices of quiche Loraine on a dark wood background
  • Quiche Loraine in a lunch time setting with a cut slice
  • Quiche Loraine on a blue board with a slice being lifted
  • Quiche Loraine on a cooling rack with a slice being lifted
  • Traditional Sherry trifle  dessert.
  • Slices of quiche Loraine whole
  • quiche Loraine slices
  • quiche Loraine slices
  • quiche Loraine slices
  • A modern square chocolate cake filled with chocolate truffle and topped with fresh raspberries
  • Ancient Egyptian case of the inner coffin of Nespamai depicting the goddess Nut. 500BC BC. Neues Museum Berlin AM 31213/2.
  • Ancient Egyptian case of the inner coffin of Nespamai depicting the goddess Nut. 500BC BC. Neues Museum Berlin AM 31213/2.
  • Photo of Roman relief sculpture, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas reliefs.  Herakles is preparing to wrestle the Libyan giant Antaios. Herakles (left) is taking off his bow case to hang it on a pillar statue. Antaios (right) is binding up his head with ear protectors, next to him stands an oil basin used in the palaistra (wrestling ground). Antaios was a famous wrestler who challenged and killed all visitors to his country, until he was defeated by Herakles.
  • Ancient Egyptian case of the inner coffin of Nespamai depicting the goddess Nut. 500BC BC. Neues Museum Berlin AM 31213/2.
  • Ancient Egyptian case of the inner coffin of Nespamai depicting the goddess Nut. 500BC BC. Neues Museum Berlin AM 31213/2.
  • Ancient Egyptian case of the inner coffin of Nespamai depicting the goddess Nut. 500BC BC. Neues Museum Berlin AM 31213/2.
  • Ancient Egyptian case of the inner coffin of Nespamai depicting the goddess Nut. 500BC BC. Neues Museum Berlin AM 31213/2.
  • Photo of Roman relief sculpture, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas reliefs.  Herakles is preparing to wrestle the Libyan giant Antaios. Herakles (left) is taking off his bow case to hang it on a pillar statue. Antaios (right) is binding up his head with ear protectors, next to him stands an oil basin used in the palaistra (wrestling ground). Antaios was a famous wrestler who challenged and killed all visitors to his country, until he was defeated by Herakles.
  • Photo of Roman relief sculpture, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas reliefs.  Herakles is preparing to wrestle the Libyan giant Antaios. Herakles (left) is taking off his bow case to hang it on a pillar statue. Antaios (right) is binding up his head with ear protectors, next to him stands an oil basin used in the palaistra (wrestling ground). Antaios was a famous wrestler who challenged and killed all visitors to his country, until he was defeated by Herakles.
  • Photo of Roman relief sculpture, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas reliefs.  Herakles is preparing to wrestle the Libyan giant Antaios. Herakles (left) is taking off his bow case to hang it on a pillar statue. Antaios (right) is binding up his head with ear protectors, next to him stands an oil basin used in the palaistra (wrestling ground). Antaios was a famous wrestler who challenged and killed all visitors to his country, until he was defeated by Herakles.
  • Photo of Roman relief sculpture, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas reliefs.  Herakles is preparing to wrestle the Libyan giant Antaios. Herakles (left) is taking off his bow case to hang it on a pillar statue. Antaios (right) is binding up his head with ear protectors, next to him stands an oil basin used in the palaistra (wrestling ground). Antaios was a famous wrestler who challenged and killed all visitors to his country, until he was defeated by Herakles.
  • Photo of Roman relief sculpture, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas reliefs.  Herakles is preparing to wrestle the Libyan giant Antaios. Herakles (left) is taking off his bow case to hang it on a pillar statue. Antaios (right) is binding up his head with ear protectors, next to him stands an oil basin used in the palaistra (wrestling ground). Antaios was a famous wrestler who challenged and killed all visitors to his country, until he was defeated by Herakles.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of  Herakles is preparing to wrestle the Libyan giant Antaios. Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.    Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Herakles (left) is taking off his bow case to hang it on a pillar statue. Antaios (right) is binding up his head with ear protectors, next to him stands an oil basin used in the palaistra (wrestling ground). Antaios was a famous wrestler who challenged and killed all visitors to his country, until he was defeated by Herakles.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of  Herakles is preparing to wrestle the Libyan giant Antaios. Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Herakles (left) is taking off his bow case to hang it on a pillar statue. Antaios (right) is binding up his head with ear protectors, next to him stands an oil basin used in the palaistra (wrestling ground). Antaios was a famous wrestler who challenged and killed all visitors to his country, until he was defeated by Herakles.
  • Close up of a RomanSebasteion relief sculpture of  Herakles is preparing to wrestle the Libyan giant Antaios. Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Herakles (left) is taking off his bow case to hang it on a pillar statue. Antaios (right) is binding up his head with ear protectors, next to him stands an oil basin used in the palaistra (wrestling ground). Antaios was a famous wrestler who challenged and killed all visitors to his country, until he was defeated by Herakles.
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of  Herakles is preparing to wrestle the Libyan giant Antaios. Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
Herakles (left) is taking off his bow case to hang it on a pillar statue. Antaios (right) is binding up his head with ear protectors, next to him stands an oil basin used in the palaistra (wrestling ground). Antaios was a famous wrestler who challenged and killed all visitors to his country, until he was defeated by Herakles.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of  Herakles is preparing to wrestle the Libyan giant Antaios. Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.    Against a white background.<br />
<br />
Herakles (left) is taking off his bow case to hang it on a pillar statue. Antaios (right) is binding up his head with ear protectors, next to him stands an oil basin used in the palaistra (wrestling ground). Antaios was a famous wrestler who challenged and killed all visitors to his country, until he was defeated by Herakles.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of  Herakles is preparing to wrestle the Libyan giant Antaios. Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.  Against a black background.<br />
<br />
Herakles (left) is taking off his bow case to hang it on a pillar statue. Antaios (right) is binding up his head with ear protectors, next to him stands an oil basin used in the palaistra (wrestling ground). Antaios was a famous wrestler who challenged and killed all visitors to his country, until he was defeated by Herakles.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of  Herakles is preparing to wrestle the Libyan giant Antaios. Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Herakles (left) is taking off his bow case to hang it on a pillar statue. Antaios (right) is binding up his head with ear protectors, next to him stands an oil basin used in the palaistra (wrestling ground). Antaios was a famous wrestler who challenged and killed all visitors to his country, until he was defeated by Herakles.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of  Herakles is preparing to wrestle the Libyan giant Antaios. Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. Against an art background.<br />
<br />
Herakles (left) is taking off his bow case to hang it on a pillar statue. Antaios (right) is binding up his head with ear protectors, next to him stands an oil basin used in the palaistra (wrestling ground). Antaios was a famous wrestler who challenged and killed all visitors to his country, until he was defeated by Herakles.
  • Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of  Herakles is preparing to wrestle the Libyan giant Antaios. Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey. Against a grey background.<br />
<br />
Herakles (left) is taking off his bow case to hang it on a pillar statue. Antaios (right) is binding up his head with ear protectors, next to him stands an oil basin used in the palaistra (wrestling ground). Antaios was a famous wrestler who challenged and killed all visitors to his country, until he was defeated by Herakles.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century v Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Abraham about to offer his son Isaac as a sacrifice<br />
  - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Abraham about to offer his son Isaac as a sacrifice<br />
  - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Abraham about to offer his son Isaac as a sacrifice<br />
  - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Abraham about to offer his son Isaac as a sacrifice<br />
  - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Abraham about to offer his son Isaac as a sacrifice<br />
  - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Adam & Eve with a serpent wrapped around a tree between them - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Adam & Eve with a serpent wrapped around a tree between them - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Adam & Eve with a serpent wrapped around a tree between them - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Adam & Eve with a serpent wrapped around a tree between them - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Adam & Eve with a serpent wrapped around a tree between them - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting two Peacocks - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
<br />
The patterns of peacock tails contain round decorations. These were seen to be the symbolic eyes of omnipotence and often ascribed to the Archangel Michael. The peacock’s feather is sometimes associated with St. Barbara Also, The peacock, (due to an ancient myth that Peacock flesh did not decay), is seen as a symbol of immortality.<br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting two Peacocks - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
<br />
The patterns of peacock tails contain round decorations. These were seen to be the symbolic eyes of omnipotence and often ascribed to the Archangel Michael. The peacock’s feather is sometimes associated with St. Barbara Also, The peacock, (due to an ancient myth that Peacock flesh did not decay), is seen as a symbol of immortality.<br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting two Peacocks - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
<br />
The patterns of peacock tails contain round decorations. These were seen to be the symbolic eyes of omnipotence and often ascribed to the Archangel Michael. The peacock’s feather is sometimes associated with St. Barbara Also, The peacock, (due to an ancient myth that Peacock flesh did not decay), is seen as a symbol of immortality.<br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting two Peacocks - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
<br />
The patterns of peacock tails contain round decorations. These were seen to be the symbolic eyes of omnipotence and often ascribed to the Archangel Michael. The peacock’s feather is sometimes associated with St. Barbara Also, The peacock, (due to an ancient myth that Peacock flesh did not decay), is seen as a symbol of immortality.<br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting two Peacocks - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
<br />
The patterns of peacock tails contain round decorations. These were seen to be the symbolic eyes of omnipotence and often ascribed to the Archangel Michael. The peacock’s feather is sometimes associated with St. Barbara Also, The peacock, (due to an ancient myth that Peacock flesh did not decay), is seen as a symbol of immortality.<br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a bird - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a bird - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a stag - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
The stag is a traditional Christian symbol for Christ, Who tramples and destroys the Devil. In the Medieval bestiaries the stag as an enemy of snakes. It was believed that stags was believed to chase snakes into their holes or rock crevices, driving them out by flooding the hole with the breath or water from its mouth, and eating them. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century  Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. v
  • Detail of a 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additio-nal details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia. Against a grey art background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a grey background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a grey art background.
  • Photo of Roman relief sculpture, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas reliefs.  Herakles is preparing to wrestle the Libyan giant Antaios. Herakles (left) is taking off his bow case to hang it on a pillar statue. Antaios (right) is binding up his head with ear protectors, next to him stands an oil basin used in the palaistra (wrestling ground). Antaios was a famous wrestler who challenged and killed all visitors to his country, until he was defeated by Herakles.
  • Medieval case known as “of Saint Louis”,  made in Limoges around 1236. Given by Philip the Fair to the Abbey of Notre Dame du Lis with relics of Saint Louis inside., Paris. inv 253, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval case known as “of Saint Louis”,  made in Limoges around 1236. Given by Philip the Fair to the Abbey of Notre Dame du Lis with relics of Saint Louis inside., Paris. inv 253, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval case known as “of Saint Louis”,  made in Limoges around 1236. Given by Philip the Fair to the Abbey of Notre Dame du Lis with relics of Saint Louis inside., Paris. inv 253, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Medieval case known as “of Saint Louis”,  made in Limoges around 1236. Given by Philip the Fair to the Abbey of Notre Dame du Lis with relics of Saint Louis inside., Paris. inv 253, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being whipped on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being whipped on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being whipped on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being whipped on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being removed from the Cross. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being removed from the Cross. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being removed from the Cross. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being removed from the Cross. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this one shows Christ carrying the Cross on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this one shows Christ carrying the Cross on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this one shows Christ carrying the Cross on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this one shows Christ carrying the Cross on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, the whipping on the Road to Calvary, Crucifixion, Descent and Mourning of the Dead Body of Christ and the Mary discovering the empty tomb. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, the whipping on the Road to Calvary, Crucifixion, Descent and Mourning of the Dead Body of Christ and the Mary discovering the empty tomb. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, the whipping on the Road to Calvary, Crucifixion, Descent and Mourning of the Dead Body of Christ and the Mary discovering the empty tomb. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being taken dwon fron the Cross and laid in a tomb. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being taken dwon fron the Cross and laid in a tomb. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being taken dwon fron the Cross and laid in a tomb. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being taken dwon fron the Cross and laid in a tomb. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being whipped and carrying the cross on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being whipped and carrying the cross on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being whipped and carrying the cross on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being whipped and carrying the cross on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being whipped on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being whipped on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, the whipping on the Road to Calvary, Crucifixion, Descent and Mourning of the Dead Body of Christ and the Mary discovering the empty tomb. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being whipped on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being whipped on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being removed from the Cross. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being removed from the Cross. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being removed from the Cross. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being removed from the Cross. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this one shows Christ carrying the Cross on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this one shows Christ carrying the Cross on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this one shows Christ carrying the Cross on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this one shows Christ carrying the Cross on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, the whipping on the Road to Calvary, Crucifixion, Descent and Mourning of the Dead Body of Christ and the Mary discovering the empty tomb. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, the whipping on the Road to Calvary, Crucifixion, Descent and Mourning of the Dead Body of Christ and the Mary discovering the empty tomb. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being taken dwon fron the Cross and laid in a tomb. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being taken dwon fron the Cross and laid in a tomb. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being taken dwon fron the Cross and laid in a tomb. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being taken dwon fron the Cross and laid in a tomb. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being whipped and carrying the cross on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being whipped and carrying the cross on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being whipped and carrying the cross on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being whipped and carrying the cross on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being whipped on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being whipped on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being whipped on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being whipped on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being removed from the Cross. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being removed from the Cross. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being removed from the Cross. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being removed from the Cross. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, the whipping on the Road to Calvary, Crucifixion, Descent and Mourning of the Dead Body of Christ and the Mary discovering the empty tomb. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this one shows Christ carrying the Cross on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this one shows Christ carrying the Cross on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this one shows Christ carrying the Cross on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this one shows Christ carrying the Cross on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, the whipping on the Road to Calvary, Crucifixion, Descent and Mourning of the Dead Body of Christ and the Mary discovering the empty tomb. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, the whipping on the Road to Calvary, Crucifixion, Descent and Mourning of the Dead Body of Christ and the Mary discovering the empty tomb. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, the whipping on the Road to Calvary, Crucifixion, Descent and Mourning of the Dead Body of Christ and the Mary discovering the empty tomb. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being taken dwon fron the Cross and laid in a tomb. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being taken dwon fron the Cross and laid in a tomb. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being taken dwon fron the Cross and laid in a tomb. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being taken dwon fron the Cross and laid in a tomb. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being whipped and carrying the cross on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being whipped and carrying the cross on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being whipped and carrying the cross on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, this scene shows Christ being whipped and carrying the cross on the road to Calvary. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Ancient Egyptian case of the inner coffin of Nespamai depicting the goddess Nut. 500BC BC. Neues Museum Berlin AM 31213/2.
  • Ancient Egyptian case of the inner coffin of Nespamai depicting the goddess Nut. 500BC BC. Neues Museum Berlin AM 31213/2.
  • Ancient Egyptian case of the inner coffin of Nespamai depicting the goddess Nut. 500BC BC. Neues Museum Berlin AM 31213/2.
  • Ancient Egyptian case of the inner coffin of Nespamai depicting the goddess Nut. 500BC BC. Neues Museum Berlin AM 31213/2.
  • Photo of Roman relief sculpture, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas reliefs.  Herakles is preparing to wrestle the Libyan giant Antaios. Herakles (left) is taking off his bow case to hang it on a pillar statue. Antaios (right) is binding up his head with ear protectors, next to him stands an oil basin used in the palaistra (wrestling ground). Antaios was a famous wrestler who challenged and killed all visitors to his country, until he was defeated by Herakles.
  • Photo of Roman relief sculpture, Aphrodisias, Turkey, Images of Roman art bas reliefs.  Herakles is preparing to wrestle the Libyan giant Antaios. Herakles (left) is taking off his bow case to hang it on a pillar statue. Antaios (right) is binding up his head with ear protectors, next to him stands an oil basin used in the palaistra (wrestling ground). Antaios was a famous wrestler who challenged and killed all visitors to his country, until he was defeated by Herakles.
  • A modern Japanese cake with a pattered chocolate case and piped chestnut puree with cumquat sauce, in a modern designer dish
  • A modern Japanese cake with a pattered chocolate case and piped chestnut puree with cumquat sauce, in a modern designer dish
  • A modern Japanese cake with a pattered choclate case and mint cream, in a modern designer dish
  • A modern Japanese cake with a pattered choclate case and mint cream, in a modern designer dish
  • A modern Japanese cake with a pattered chocolate case and piped chestnut puree with cumquat sauce, in a modern designer dish
  • A modern Japanese cake with a pattered chocolate case and piped chestnut puree with cumquat sauce, in a modern designer dish
  • Close up of a Roman Sebasteion relief sculpture of  Herakles is preparing to wrestle the Libyan giant Antaios. Aphrodisias Museum, Aphrodisias, Turkey.<br />
<br />
Herakles (left) is taking off his bow case to hang it on a pillar statue. Antaios (right) is binding up his head with ear protectors, next to him stands an oil basin used in the palaistra (wrestling ground). Antaios was a famous wrestler who challenged and killed all visitors to his country, until he was defeated by Herakles.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a bird - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a white background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a bird - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting a bird - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional attitudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.  Against a black background.
  • 6th-7th Century Eastern Roman Byzantine  Christian Terracotta tiles depicting Christ changing Water into wine - Produced in Byzacena -  present day Tunisia. <br />
<br />
These early Christian terracotta tiles were mass produced thanks to moulds. Their quadrangular, square or rectangular shape as well as the standardised sizes in use in the different regions were determined by their architectonic function and were designed to facilitate their assembly according to various combinations to decorate large flat surfaces of walls or ceilings. <br />
<br />
Byzacena stood out for its use of biblical and hagiographic themes and a richer variety of animals, birds and roses. Some deer and lions were obviously inspired from Zeugitana prototypes attesting to the pre-existence of this province's production with respect to that of Byzacena. The rules governing this art are similar to those that applied to late Roman and Christian art with, in the case of Byzacena, an obvious popular connotation. Its distinguishing features are flatness, a predilection for symmetrical compositions, frontal and lateral representations, the absence of tridimensional atti-tudes and the naivety of some details (large eyes, pointed chins). Mass production enabled this type of decoration to be widely used at little cost and it played a role as ideograms and for teaching catechism through pictures. Painting, now often faded, enhanced motifs in relief or enriched them with additional details to break their repetitive monotony.<br />
<br />
The Bardo National Museum Tunis, Tunisia.   Against a grey background.
  • Medieval case known as “of Saint Louis”,  made in Limoges around 1236. Given by Philip the Fair to the Abbey of Notre Dame du Lis with relics of Saint Louis inside., Paris. inv 253, The Louvre Museum, Paris.
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, the whipping on the Road to Calvary, Crucifixion, Descent and Mourning of the Dead Body of Christ and the Mary discovering the empty tomb. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • Romanesque painted Beam depicting The Passion and the Stations of the Cross<br />
<br />
Around 1192-1220, Tempera on wood from Catalonia, Spain.<br />
<br />
Acquisition of Museums Board's campaign in 1907. MNAC 15833.<br />
<br />
It is not known what was the original location of the beam, but it might have been part of the structure of a canopy. In any case, it was reused in a ceiling, as evidenced by the cuts that are at the top. It is decorated with seven scenes from the Passion and Resurrection of Christ, the whipping on the Road to Calvary, Crucifixion, Descent and Mourning of the Dead Body of Christ and the Mary discovering the empty tomb. The narrative character in the images and the predominance of yellow is typical of Catalan painting of the 1200’s,  specifically with illustrations of Liber Feudorum Maior, a late twelfth-century illuminated cartulary book style of the Crown of Aragon
  • A modern fruit cake with redcurrants, wild strawberries, blacberry and creme patisserie in a light sponge case in a designer dish.
  • A modern Japanese cake with a pattered chocolate case and piped chestnut puree with cumquat sauce, in a modern designer dish
  • Original Roman bronze statue of Emperor Marcus Aurelius on horseback. 175 AD. Marcus Aurelus was the last of the Five Good Emperors, and is also considered one of the most important Stoic philosophers. In 1979 it was discovered that the the equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, in the courtyard of the Capitline Museum, had suffered badly from corrosion, particularly in its legs. The staue was removed from Michael Angelo’s plinth and was transferred to the National Instution for the Restoration of works of art for preservation. On the 11th of April 1990 the restored statue was returned to the Cpitaline courtyard and covered with a glass protective casing. The glass box ruined the design of Michael Angelo’s courtyard and it was decided to make a copy to display in the courted and move the original into the Capitoiline Musuem. This is a rare example of a bronze equestrian statue as it became common practice for the Romans in the late empire to melt down bronze statues to mint coins. The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Original Roman bronze statue of Emperor Marcus Aurelius on horseback. 175 AD. Marcus Aurelus was the last of the Five Good Emperors, and is also considered one of the most important Stoic philosophers. In 1979 it was discovered that the the equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, in the courtyard of the Capitline Museum, had suffered badly from corrosion, particularly in its legs. The staue was removed from Michael Angelo’s plinth and was transferred to the National Instution for the Restoration of works of art for preservation. On the 11th of April 1990 the restored statue was returned to the Cpitaline courtyard and covered with a glass protective casing. The glass box ruined the design of Michael Angelo’s courtyard and it was decided to make a copy to display in the courted and move the original into the Capitoiline Musuem. This is a rare example of a bronze equestrian statue as it became common practice for the Romans in the late empire to melt down bronze statues to mint coins. The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Original Roman bronze statue of Emperor Marcus Aurelius on horseback. 175 AD. Marcus Aurelus was the last of the Five Good Emperors, and is also considered one of the most important Stoic philosophers. In 1979 it was discovered that the the equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, in the courtyard of the Capitline Museum, had suffered badly from corrosion, particularly in its legs. The staue was removed from Michael Angelo’s plinth and was transferred to the National Instution for the Restoration of works of art for preservation. On the 11th of April 1990 the restored statue was returned to the Cpitaline courtyard and covered with a glass protective casing. The glass box ruined the design of Michael Angelo’s courtyard and it was decided to make a copy to display in the courted and move the original into the Capitoiline Musuem. This is a rare example of a bronze equestrian statue as it became common practice for the Romans in the late empire to melt down bronze statues to mint coins. The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Original Roman bronze statue of Emperor Marcus Aurelius on horseback. 175 AD. Marcus Aurelus was the last of the Five Good Emperors, and is also considered one of the most important Stoic philosophers. In 1979 it was discovered that the the equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, in the courtyard of the Capitline Museum, had suffered badly from corrosion, particularly in its legs. The staue was removed from Michael Angelo’s plinth and was transferred to the National Instution for the Restoration of works of art for preservation. On the 11th of April 1990 the restored statue was returned to the Cpitaline courtyard and covered with a glass protective casing. The glass box ruined the design of Michael Angelo’s courtyard and it was decided to make a copy to display in the courted and move the original into the Capitoiline Musuem. This is a rare example of a bronze equestrian statue as it became common practice for the Romans in the late empire to melt down bronze statues to mint coins. The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Original Roman bronze statue of Emperor Marcus Aurelius on horseback. 175 AD. Marcus Aurelus was the last of the Five Good Emperors, and is also considered one of the most important Stoic philosophers. In 1979 it was discovered that the the equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, in the courtyard of the Capitline Museum, had suffered badly from corrosion, particularly in its legs. The staue was removed from Michael Angelo’s plinth and was transferred to the National Instution for the Restoration of works of art for preservation. On the 11th of April 1990 the restored statue was returned to the Cpitaline courtyard and covered with a glass protective casing. The glass box ruined the design of Michael Angelo’s courtyard and it was decided to make a copy to display in the courted and move the original into the Capitoiline Musuem. This is a rare example of a bronze equestrian statue as it became common practice for the Romans in the late empire to melt down bronze statues to mint coins. The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Original Roman bronze statue of Emperor Marcus Aurelius on horseback. 175 AD. Marcus Aurelus was the last of the Five Good Emperors, and is also considered one of the most important Stoic philosophers. In 1979 it was discovered that the the equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, in the courtyard of the Capitline Museum, had suffered badly from corrosion, particularly in its legs. The staue was removed from Michael Angelo’s plinth and was transferred to the National Instution for the Restoration of works of art for preservation. On the 11th of April 1990 the restored statue was returned to the Cpitaline courtyard and covered with a glass protective casing. The glass box ruined the design of Michael Angelo’s courtyard and it was decided to make a copy to display in the courted and move the original into the Capitoiline Musuem. This is a rare example of a bronze equestrian statue as it became common practice for the Romans in the late empire to melt down bronze statues to mint coins. The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Original Roman bronze statue of Emperor Marcus Aurelius on horseback. 175 AD. Marcus Aurelus was the last of the Five Good Emperors, and is also considered one of the most important Stoic philosophers. In 1979 it was discovered that the the equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, in the courtyard of the Capitline Museum, had suffered badly from corrosion, particularly in its legs. The staue was removed from Michael Angelo’s plinth and was transferred to the National Instution for the Restoration of works of art for preservation. On the 11th of April 1990 the restored statue was returned to the Cpitaline courtyard and covered with a glass protective casing. The glass box ruined the design of Michael Angelo’s courtyard and it was decided to make a copy to display in the courted and move the original into the Capitoiline Musuem. This is a rare example of a bronze equestrian statue as it became common practice for the Romans in the late empire to melt down bronze statues to mint coins. The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Original Roman bronze statue of Emperor Marcus Aurelius on horseback. 175 AD. Marcus Aurelus was the last of the Five Good Emperors, and is also considered one of the most important Stoic philosophers. In 1979 it was discovered that the the equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, in the courtyard of the Capitline Museum, had suffered badly from corrosion, particularly in its legs. The staue was removed from Michael Angelo’s plinth and was transferred to the National Instution for the Restoration of works of art for preservation. On the 11th of April 1990 the restored statue was returned to the Cpitaline courtyard and covered with a glass protective casing. The glass box ruined the design of Michael Angelo’s courtyard and it was decided to make a copy to display in the courted and move the original into the Capitoiline Musuem. This is a rare example of a bronze equestrian statue as it became common practice for the Romans in the late empire to melt down bronze statues to mint coins. The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Original Roman bronze statue of Emperor Marcus Aurelius on horseback. 175 AD. Marcus Aurelius was the last of the Five Good Emperors, and is also considered one of the most important Stoic philosophers. In 1979 it was discovered that the the equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, in the courtyard of the Capitline Museum, had suffered badly from corrosion, particularly in its legs. The staue was removed from Michael Angelo’s plinth and was transferred to the National Instution for the Restoration of works of art for preservation. On the 11th of April 1990 the restored statue was returned to the Cpitaline courtyard and covered with a glass protective casing. The glass box ruined the design of Michael Angelo’s courtyard and it was decided to make a copy to display in the courted and move the original into the Capitoiline Musuem. This is a rare example of a bronze equestrian statue as it became common practice for the Romans in the late empire to melt down bronze statues to mint coins. The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • Original Roman bronze statue of Emperor Marcus Aurelius on horseback. 175 AD. Marcus Aurelus was the last of the Five Good Emperors, and is also considered one of the most important Stoic philosophers. In 1979 it was discovered that the the equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, in the courtyard of the Capitline Museum, had suffered badly from corrosion, particularly in its legs. The staue was removed from Michael Angelo’s plinth and was transferred to the National Instution for the Restoration of works of art for preservation. On the 11th of April 1990 the restored statue was returned to the Cpitaline courtyard and covered with a glass protective casing. The glass box ruined the design of Michael Angelo’s courtyard and it was decided to make a copy to display in the courted and move the original into the Capitoiline Musuem. This is a rare example of a bronze equestrian statue as it became common practice for the Romans in the late empire to melt down bronze statues to mint coins. The Capitoline Museums, Rome
  • A modern cakes with a pattered choclate cases, filled with chestnut puree and Kirch sponge

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